Gut Pathogens celebrates its 10th anniversary
Gut Pathogens was founded in 2009 as a journal focusing on enteric infections and aimed at an audience in the Global South and middle income countries. The focus of the first articles remained directed at virulence, epidemiology and genomics of classical pathogens. However, soon after the developments in the field of probiotics turned the journal into a preferred venue for research on this topic. Furthermore, parallel developments in genomics of bacteria resulted in an increase of short articles documenting bacterial genomics, and this led us to create a new short article type called Genome Announcements. Soon after, the s...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - June 26, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Niyaz Ahmed Tags: Biology Developing World Health Medicine bacterial genomics enteric infections gastroenterology gut gut pathogens gut-brain axis microbiome Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 5th June 2019
Two weeks'worth of recent things.  StatisticsFemale genital mutilation, Jan - Mar 2019Maternity statistics, Feb 2019Quarterly conceptions to women aged under 18 years, England and Wales, Jan - Mar 2018Mental healthThe perinatal mental health (PMH) matrix: Improving the quality of care for women (NICE Blog)Global healthWhy Rohingya women risk dangerous home births in Bangladesh's refugee camps (The New Humanitarian)And alsoTaking the p***: the decline of the great British public toilet (Royal Society for Public Health) Acknowledgements, as ever to King's Fund Library, Embed Health Consortium. (Source: Browsing)
Source: Browsing - June 5, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

More Breakfast Science to Sink Your Teeth Into
A newly-published study on 5,000 British children reveals that those from higher socioeconomic groups or from white backgrounds perform more exercise than do children from lower socioeconomic groups or from certain ethnic backgrounds including Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Black Caribbean/African. The amount of exercise correlated inversely with levels of overweight and obesity (i.e., the more exercise a child took, the slimmer they were likely to be).Not mentioned by the authors of the study is that their data also correlate inversely with the consumption of breakfast (children from lower socioeconomic groups tend to...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 30, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Terence Kealey Source Type: blogs

Shamima Begum and the Public Good
Written by Steve Clarke,Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities and Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford, & School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Charles Sturt University   Shamima Begum, who left the UK in 2015 at age 15, to join the Islamic State, has been the subject of consistent media attention since she […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Clarke Tags: Decision making Ethics Health Care Politics Bangladesh Citizenship crime Current Affairs Hisba Islamic State regulation religion Sajid Javid Shamima Begum Steve Clarke's Posts syndicated Syria Tasnime Akunjee terrorism Source Type: blogs

The heart of the issue: organ donation in London ’s ethnic minority communities
This report presents the results of a survey looking at attitudes towards organ donation within the BAME community in London. Of BAME Londoners surveyed: 42 per cent are not willing to donate with many citing cultural or religious reasons; only 1 per cent said they are on the organ donor register; and Bangladeshis and Black Africans are the least unwilling demographic to donate. The Committee sets out what it feels is needed to promote and encourage organ donation by BAME Londoners.ReportMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - March 19, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Source Type: blogs

Stalking the wild garganey in West Sacramento #birding #eBird #iNaturalist #birdphotography #nikonD500
So - I did a thing today. A new thing for me. I officially became a bird nut. For the first time in my life, I went on an outing to see a rare bird that I read about online.I went to West Sacramento, to a pond there, to see, and hopefully take pictures of, a garganey. What, you ask, is a garganey? It is a kind of duck. According to Wikipedia:The garganey (Spatula querquedula) is a small dabbling duck. It breeds in much of Europe and western Asia, but is strictly migratory, with the entire population moving to southern Africa, India (in particular Santragachi), Banglade...
Source: The Tree of Life - March 10, 2019 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Tiptoeing Around Facebook In Healthcare
Data privacy scandals, help in rigging elections, spreading fake news: Facebook has some tough months behind it and users are not happy with the social media giant’s performance. However, Mark Zuckerberg’s company does not only have a political and social impact, but it’s also quite relevant in healthcare. We looked around what Facebook currently does in healthcare and evaluated whether those are viable ways to follow in the future. What have you done to the world, Zuck? In November 2018, a Fortune poll suggested that Americans consider Facebook to be the least trustworthy of all the major technolo...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 28, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Security & Privacy Social media in Healthcare AI facebook fake news future Innovation Mark Zuckerberg smart healthcare technology VR Source Type: blogs

45,000 “Special Interest Aliens” Caught Since 2007, But No U.S. Terrorist Attacks from Illegal Border Crossers
ConclusionSo far, there have been zero people murdered or injured in terror attacks committed by illegal border crossers on U.S. soil.   This includes those who entered as illegal immigrants and those who entered illegally and then applied for asylum.  Only seven terrorists from special interest countries, all of whom entered prior to the government putting those countries on a list, even entered the U.S. illegally by crossing a land border.  Two of them were arrested within hours of doing so, two other received asylum, and none of them crossed the Mexican border. Our above evidence is based on past eve...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 17, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier, Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Center for Immigration Studies Shows a Very Small Threat from Terrorists Crossing the Mexican Border
Todd Bensman, the Senior National Security Fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS), wrote a recent report entitled “Have Terrorists Crossed Our Border?” in which he presents a list of  “15 suspected terrorists have been apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border, or en route, since 2001.”  Bensman lists these 15 individuals, some of which don’t have names, and describes their actions.  He writes that his research is based on publicly availab le information, so it is likely a “significant under-count” of the actual terrorists who entered.  Bensman also writ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 28, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Fever, Abdominal pain, Constipation and Mary
aka Tropical Travel Trouble 012 A 30 year old chef presented to ED with a history of 6 days of fevers and rigors. He returned from Bangladesh one week ago where he was visiting family for 2 weeks. He had a mild headache and neck pain and some intermittent lower abdominal pain. He has had no ... The post Fever, Abdominal pain, Constipation and Mary appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Infectious Disease Tropical Medicine Mary Mallon Salmonella Typhi Typhoid Typhoid Mary Source Type: blogs

Raj of the NHS – How doctors from India and Pakistan saved the NHS
By ROHIN FRANCIS  India and Pakistan celebrate 71 years of Independence today. The British National Health Service owes them a debt of gratitude. Great Britain’s national dish is famously chicken curry, but South Asia’s impact on this sceptred isle extends far beyond food. It is a testament to how ingrained into the British psyche the stereotypical Indian doctor has become that in 2005 a poll of Brits found the doctor they’d most like to consult is a 30-something South Asian female. In 2010 the BBC even ran a popular TV series simply entitled ‘The Indian Doctor’ following a story played ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: NHS Source Type: blogs

Health4TheWorld Named Tech Startup of The Year: Interview with Founders
Health4TheWorld, a Silicon Valley start-up providing education and technology solutions for resource-poor communities worldwide, has been named the 2018 Stevie Silver Award Winner by the American Business Awards for the category of Services. Created in 2002, the Stevie Awards are meant to “honor and generate public recognition of the achievements and positive contributions of organizations and working professionals worldwide.” One of the competition judges described Health4TheWorld as, “One of the best uses of technology to help patients with limited access to healthcare.” Commenting on the rec...
Source: Medgadget - August 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

The Computer-Glitch Argument for Central Bank eCash
As if central banks ’ powers and balance sheets haven’t grown quite enough since the outbreak of the subprime crisis, we’ve been hearing more and more calls for them to expand their role in retail payments, by supplying digital money directly to the general public.Some proposals would have central banks do this by letting ordinary citizens open central bank accounts, while others would have them design and market their own P2P“digital currency.” Either sort of central bank digital money would, the plans ’ supporters claim, be just as convenient as today’s dollar-denominated private...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 7, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 006 Watery Diarrhoea
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 006 Our medical student who caught shigella on a Nepalese elective has a thirst for adventure. They plan to help at a Bangladesh refugee camp but the latest CDC report states there have been some cases of cholera. They’ve done a little bit of reading and want your help to teach them all about cholera and how they may prepare and best serve their new community. Questions: Q1. What is cholera and how is it transmitted? Answer and inte...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 27, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine cholera diarrhoea john snow ORS rice water diarrhoea watery diarrhoea Source Type: blogs

A GIS-based Transport Network for Emergency Referral in Bangladesh
By FARASHA BASHIR Access to basic healthcare services is a cardinal human right, enshrined in the World Health Organization’s Constitution, which envisions the “highest attainable standard of health as a fundamental right of every human being”. Comprehensive, quality healthcare services are critical not only for treatment, but also prevention and management of illnesses which culminates in reducing unnecessary death and injuries and increasing overall life expectancy. Globally, millions of people face challenges accessing adequate healthcare services, with those living in rural settings the most affected...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Get to Know Your Asian Indian Caucus
A monolingual speech-language pathologist recently reached out to ASHA’s Asian Indian Caucus (AIC) for a Tamil-speaking SLP to provide services for a 70-year-old elderly New Jersey man. The patient had expressive aphasia due to a recent stroke. The AIC community—through its active listserve—immediately located a bilingual SLP who spoke English and Tamil. The SLP worked with the client’s local SLP to help him receive linguistically and culturally appropriate services. In another instance, a 35-year-old female vocalist— referred to the AIC by a laryngologist in California—was seeking consu...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - March 14, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Akila Rajappa Tags: Advocacy Audiology Slider Speech-Language Pathology ASHA Convention Cultural Diversity Professional Development Source Type: blogs

 Get to Know Your Asian Indian Caucus
The AIC Caucus met this past November at the 2017 ASHA Convention in Los Angeles. A monolingual speech-language pathologist recently reached out to ASHA’s Asian Indian Caucus (AIC) for a Tamil-speaking SLP to provide services for a 70-year-old elderly New Jersey man. The patient had expressive aphasia due to a recent stroke. The AIC community—through its active listserve—immediately located a bilingual SLP who spoke English and Tamil. The SLP worked with the client’s local SLP to help him receive linguistically and culturally appropriate services. In another instance, a 35-year-old female vocalist&m...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - March 14, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Akila Rajappa Tags: Advocacy Audiology Speech-Language Pathology ASHA Convention Cultural Diversity Professional Development Source Type: blogs

A patient becomes a medical student
I was a four-year-old kid when I was about to begin my first day of school. I was born and raised 20 kilometers away from the big city in a small rural area with minimal essential amenities — for example, schools, roads, and hospitals. Like all other kids, it was a momentous occasion for me to start my first day of school, and I remember how exciting it was. As I started to attend regular classes and enjoyed participating in different sports activity, I began to have shortness of breath with little exertion, cough and recurrent chest infections that only would decrease after taking antibiotics. My father took me to a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/vivek-podder" rel="tag" > Vivek Podder < /a > Tags: Education Cardiology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Matthew Holt ’ s EOY 2017 letter (charities/issues/gossip)
Right at the end of every year I write a letter summarizing my issues and charities. And as I own the joint here, I post it on THCB! Please take a look–Matthew Holt Well 2017 has been quite a year, and last year 2016 I failed to get my end-of-year letter out at all. This I would like to think was due to extreme business but it probably came down to me being totally lazy. On the other hand like many of you I may have just been depressed about the election–2016 was summed up by our cat vomiting on our bed at 11.55 on New Years Eve. Having said that even though most of you will never comment on this letter and I ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: Matthew Holt Charity Patient Activism Source Type: blogs

Diphtheria in Bangladesh and Myanmar
An outbreak of diphtheria has been reported in Bangladesh among Royingya refugees from Myanmar – two countries which have experienced similar histories of disease incidence and vaccination uptake for several decades (see graph). [1,2] References: Berger S. Diphtheria: Global Status, 2017. 347 pages, 447 graphs, 533 references. Gideon e-books, https://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/diphtheria-global-status/ Gideon e-Gideon multi-graph tool,  https://www.gideononline.com/cases/multi-graphs/ The post Diphtheria in Bangladesh and Myanmar appeared first on GIDEON - Global Infectious Diseases an...
Source: GIDEON blog - December 14, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED Source Type: blogs

One in a Billion Chance a Year of Being Killed by a Chain Immigrant in a Terror Attack
Yesterday, Bangladesh-born  Akayed Ullah attempted a suicide bombing in New York City.  Fortunately, he only injured a few people and severely burned his own torso.  Ullah entered the United States on an F4 green card for the brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens.Some are using Ullah ’s failed terrorist attack to call for further restricting family-based immigration and the green card lottery.  After hearing about the failed terrorist attack, President Trump argued that “Today’s terror suspect entered our country through extended-family chain migration, which is inc...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 12, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Ethnic Cleansing vs. Genocide: The Politics Behind Labeling the Rohingya Crisis
On November 22, aftersome reluctance, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson joined theUnited Nations andUnited Kingdom in calling the current Rohingya crisis an “ethnic cleansing. ” Holding Myanmar’s military, security forces, and local vigilantes responsible for the crisis, Tillerson stated that the United Statescould pursueaccountability via targeted sanctions. While some hailed Tillerson ’s label of ethnic cleansingas a start, it ’s worth taking a closer look at the politics behind it. First, ethnic cleansing does not elicit a legal response, whereas the labels of “crimes against huma...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 29, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Sahar Khan Source Type: blogs

Guide to the Diversity Visa: Demographics, Criminality, and Terrorism Risk
ConclusionThe diversity visa is a relatively small green card category that has allowed in about a million legal immigrant principals since 1993, or about 5 percent of the total.   As far as we know, immigrants who entered on the diversity visa are responsible for committing one terrorist attack on U.S. soil that murdered eight people.  Foreign-born people from countries that have sent many diversity visa immigrants to the United States have lower incarceration rates than native-born Americans.  Calls to end the diversity visa based on a single deadly terrorist attack are premature. Table 1Diversity Vis...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 2, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

So What ’s The Problem With Rice?
There is no question that, in this barrel of rotten apples, wheat is the rottenest. But you still may not want to make cider with those other apples. What I call “non-wheat grains,” such as oats, barley, rye, millet, teff, sorghum, corn, and rice, are nonetheless seeds of grasses whose consumption has the potential for harmful effects. I would classify non-wheat grains as less bad than the worst— modern wheat— but less bad is not necessarily good. (That extraordinarily simple insight— that less bad is not necessarily good— is one that will serve you well over and over as you learn to que...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 11, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Rice Undoctored Wheat Belly blood sugar diabetes Dr. Davis gluten gluten-free grain grain-free Weight Loss Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

Travel Ban Is Based on Executive Whim, Not Objective Criteria
ConclusionFor countries on the list, and for any country wishing to remain off the list, it is vitally important that they understand which factors led to their inclusion or exclusion. If the United States is acting in good faith —seeking to change behavior as opposed to looking for an excuse to ban people—its criteria should be clearly explained and understood. The Iran nuclear deal, for example, hasvery precise requirements for Iran to avoid sanctions, down to the exact percentage of purity for its enriched uranium. This is very far from the case here.No consistent combination of factors or mitigating factors...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 9, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Thelaziasis
The following background data on Thelaziasis are abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com.  Primary references are available from the author. Thelaziasis (“oriental eye worm”) in humans was first reported in China in 1917, and autochthonous cases were initially limited to Asia.  Over 1,000 cases of human infection were estimated for Asia during a 20-year period (2016 publication)  Cases have since been reported in Africa, Asia, Europe and North America.  The condition is most common during summer and fall, and involves proximity to dogs.  61% of patients are either elderly adult...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 23, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Addressing The Gap In Noncommunicable Disease Data With Technology And Innovation
High-quality health data is the backbone of strong public health policies. When government officials and public health professionals understand the factors that influence health, they can make informed decisions about how and where to target public health interventions and resources.  In low- and middle-income countries, noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) account for 67 percent of deaths but only 1 percent of global health funding (see page 5). As the NCD epidemic reaches all countries—regardless of income level, high-quality, quickly accessible data that provide information about NCD risk factors are the lever for...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 21, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Kelly Henning Tags: Featured GrantWatch Public Health Bloomberg Philanthropies CDC Foundation Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chronic Care Global Health Health Data Health Philanthropy Health Promotion and Disease PreventionGW Johns Hopkins U Source Type: blogs

The United States Can Reduce Socioeconomic Disparities By Focusing On Chronic Diseases
“It is natural to ask whether rising gaps in income might be associated with widening gaps in health and longevity between rich and poor Americans,” Jacob Bor and colleagues noted in an article in The Lancet this spring. This association is bidirectional: If someone is poor, they have a greater likelihood of having chronic illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease and associated complications. Illness also restricts financial security, especially within communities of color. The June issue of Health Affairs, Pursuing Health Equity, draws much needed attention to the need to pursue solutions that add...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 17, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Kenneth Thorpe, Kathy Ko Chin, Yanira Cruz, Marjorie A. Innocent and Lillian Singh Tags: Health Equity Population Health chronic disease socioeconomic disparities Source Type: blogs

CriticaLink Helps Countries Lacking EMS
Jennifer Farrell, a Fulbright scholar and fourth-year medical student at Tulane University, founded CriticaLink, a nonprofit mobile app company, to more quickly help first responders get to accidents in countries where emergency medical services are inconsistent or, in some cases, nonexistent.   Calls made through the app will be dispatched through a call center, or app users can send photos and submit geo-tagged information. When accidents are reported, nearby trained first responders will receive a ping and a pop-up notification on their phones. The number for the call center is a long one for now (096 7878 7878)...
Source: Technology & Inventions - January 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

New Who Guidelines To End Aids In Bangladesh
The prevalence of HIV in people who inject drugs (PWID) in Dhaka was 7% in 2007 and 5.3% in 2011, so it seems to be contained; and HIV prevalence has remained low (within 0 to 2%) in other key populations such as female sex workers, men who have sex with men, and transgender persons. However, the demographics of Bangladesh present considerable challenges to the HIV prevention programme. Bangladesh is a densely populated country, with enduring poverty, low levels of education, gender inequality and high level of cross-border travel. As the AIDS epidemic changes shape, so must the HIV prevention programme. You will find the ...
Source: aids-write.org - November 8, 2013 Category: HIV AIDS Authors: aidswrite Tags: current news aids Source Type: blogs

Incidence of asymptomatic human influenza A(H5N1) virus infection
When virologists Fouchier and Kawaoka were isolating avian influenza H5N1 viruses that could transmit among ferrets by aerosol, there was consternation from some quarters that such viruses might escape from the laboratory and cause a pandemic in humans. Part of the fear came from the fact that the case fatality ratio for human infections with the H5N1 virus exceeds 50%. This number could be substantially higher than the lethality ratio, which is the number of symptomatic cases divided by the total number of infections. Divining the latter number has been difficult. Results of a meta-analysis published in 2012 suggest ...
Source: virology blog - October 1, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information asymptomatic avian Bangladesh case fatality ratio fouchier influenza A(H5N1) kawaoka mortality ratio viral virus Source Type: blogs

Incidence of asymptomatic human influenza A(H5N1) virus infection
When virologists Fouchier and Kawaoka were isolating avian influenza H5N1 viruses that could transmit among ferrets by aerosol, there was consternation from some quarters that such viruses might escape from the laboratory and cause a pandemic in humans. Part of the fear came from the fact that the case fatality ratio for human infections with the H5N1 virus exceeds 50%. This number could be substantially higher than the lethality ratio, which is the number of symptomatic cases divided by the total number of infections. Divining the latter number has been difficult. Results of a meta-analysis published in 2012 suggest ...
Source: virology blog - October 1, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information asymptomatic avian Bangladesh case fatality ratio fouchier influenza A(H5N1) kawaoka mortality ratio viral virus Source Type: blogs

The Real Consequences of Raising Tariffs for Bangladesh
K. William Watson As I noted yesterday, the Obama administration has suspended Bangladesh from the list of poor countries that receive preferential tariff treatment in the United States, citing concerns over workplace safety and inadequate labor laws. The vast majority of imports from Bangladesh will not be affected because apparel goods were already exempt from the program. But some tariffs will go up and the human cost of these new taxes is very real.  The Wall Street Journal’s coverage of yesterday’s announcement includes this anecdote: Higher porcelain duties will put a strain on the business of Ian Z...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 28, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: K. William Watson Source Type: blogs

Crazy Backward Policy Toward Bangladesh
K. William Watson It is widely expected that the Obama Administration will act today to suspend Bangladesh from the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) program in response to a complaint from U.S. labor unions. Under the GSP program, some imports from some low-income countries can enter the U.S. market without paying tariffs. (Sallie James has done excellent work describing the pros and cons of this policy from a free trade perspective). Supporters of the suspension point to recent deadly industrial accidents to argue that Bangladesh needs stronger labor laws before being allowed to benefit from GSP tariff rates. In t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 27, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: K. William Watson Source Type: blogs

Help Poor People in Bangladesh by Buying the Clothes They Make
K. William Watson The tragic building collapse in Bangladesh two weeks ago, killing over 900 people, has focused public attention on working conditions for garment workers around the world. The attention has intensified calls for Western clothing brands to insist on better working conditions in  the factories around the developing world where their products are made. According to the New York Times, some companies are responding to consumer concerns by marketing their “fair labor” practices on product labels. The development of a fair trade movement for clothing is in many ways encouraging. It demonstrate...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 10, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: K. William Watson Source Type: blogs

Day 1 of the 13th Bangladesh Society of Medicine Congress
Many friends and family want to know what is happening here in Bangladesh.  This newspaper article seems quite accurate - Bangladesh death sentence sparks deadly protests These paragraphs resonate with what many physicians have explained -  Michael Kugelman, south Asia expert at the Woodrow Wilson International Centre, Washington, also warned against comparisons with the Arab spring. "In Eypt and elsewhere it was all about movements to bring democratic change. Bangladesh already has democracy, however flawed," he said. A general election is likely later this year. Kugelman added however that &qu...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - March 2, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Traveling to Bangladesh for ACP
This weekend I will represent the ACP at the Bangladesh Society of Medicine meeting in Dhaka.  During the conference I will give 1 talk – Learning to Think LIke a Physician.  Readers of this blog would find the talk somewhat familiar, as I focus on system 1 and system 2 thinking, heuristics and biases and naturalistic decision making. Today I am in Hong Kong.  Yesterday's flight took 15 hours (from Chicago to Hong Kong).  Fortunately I was in Economy Premium.  This new, more reasonably priced option, gives significant leg room and reasonable reclining.  I consciously got out of my ch...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - February 27, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs