Researchers stumped by plants with multiple chromosomes set January meeting to collaborate
(Texas A&M AgriLife Communications) Some of the world's most beloved plants -- coffee, bananas, potatoes, chrysanthemums and roses, to name a few -- could be made even better, but the complexity of their chromosomes either stumps or stifles scientists who study them.With a $47,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture, about 40 researchers will convene in San Diego Jan. 11-12 to begin collaborating on polyploid studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Foods That Can Help with Acid Reflux Symptoms - AARP
2 hours ago ... Do you suffer from frequent heartburn? Then you might have acid reflux. Try foods like bananas, oatmeal and yogurt to help manage the  ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - July 28, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

QUT develops golden bananas high in pro-vitamin A
(Queensland University of Technology) QUT has produced Ugandan bananas high in pro-vitamin A.Cooking bananas are the staple food in rural UgandaWorldwide 650 000 - 750 000 children die from vitamin A deficiency.Ugandan farmers will be growing pro-vitamin A rich bananas in 2021.A humanitarian project backed by the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Beyond bananas: 'Mind reading' technology decodes complex thoughts
(Carnegie Mellon University) This latest research led by CMU's Marcel Just builds on the pioneering use of machine learning algorithms with brain imaging technology to " mind read. " The findings indicate that the mind's building blocks for constructing complex thoughts are formed by the brain's various sub-systems and are not word-based. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ghost writer: how Martino Sclavi's brain tumour helped him write a book
Expected to die, and having lost the ability to read, the Italian film producer devoted himself to a near-impossible taskI meet Martino Sclavi in Islington, north London, where he shares a small flat. It ’s a perfectly ordinary summer morning: pigeons are cooing and somewhere far off, a siren sounds. But in Sclavi’s kitchen, everything is slightly skewed, our encounter just a notch off normal. For one thing, there is the peculiar food he is trying to make me eat at only 10 o’clock: a pie fille d with grey-looking onions, mushrooms and nuts, which tastes powerfully of chilli. For another, there is the fact that while ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Cooke Tags: Books Cancer Cancer research Russell Brand Culture Health Medical research Source Type: news

Expert reveals how even natural foods contain chemicals
Haileybury chemistry teacher James Kennedy from Australia creates ingredients lists for natural foods, such as bananas, peaches and strawberries. They contain as many as 50 different chemicals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I Used An App To Buy Only Ethical Food. It Was Really Hard.
As I walked up to the banana pileup, I knew I was in trouble. Sure, those things are an excellent (and affordable) healthy snack, but they are almost universally sourced from producers with serious ethical issues. Yet I still wanted them. What would Michael Pollan do?! Sheepishly, I scanned the banana barcode using HowGood, a free app intended to help shoppers make more ethical food purchases. I’d been using the app all week to try to make all the “right” choices at the grocery store. The app revealed, unsurprisingly, that the bananas did not meet HowGood’s sustainability standards, but there were n...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors Once Thought Bananas Cured Celiac Disease. They Saved Kids' Lives – At A Cost
In the early 20th century, kids with the disease faced severe malnutrition, even death. The banana-based diet doctors came up with seemed to cure them — but led kids back to foods that made them sick.(Image credit: AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jill Neimark Source Type: news

Doctors Once Thought Bananas Cured Celiac Disease. They Saved Kids' Lives — At A Cost
In the early 20th century, kids with the disease faced severe malnutrition, even death. The banana-based diet doctors came up with seemed to cure them — but led kids back to foods that made them sick.(Image credit: AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jill Neimark Source Type: news

You'd be BANANAS not to eat them!
It turns out Britons now bin an astonishing £80 million worth of bananas a year because they are ‘too ripe’ – with perhaps a minor bruise or a black mark on the skin. Here's how to use them (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Human noses are tuned to chocolate, wine and bananas
An expert from Rutgers University in New Jersey has claimed that the human sense of smell is just as good as in other mammals, like rodents and dogs, but is fine-tuned to different scents. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

According To Nutritionists, Here's What You Should Eat For Healthy Digestion
Summer is eagerly peering around the corner, bringing with her the tastiest foods we might definitely wait for all year long. From ballpark hot dogs and boardwalk ice cream, to barbecue and cotton candy, summertime activities have a way of focusing on one food experience after another. (No judgment, here!) Yet, unfortunately for you, all of those summer treats could be packing a one-two punch to your gut. Given the plethora of sweet and salty summer snacks, it’s easy to overindulge. That’s why it’s important to take note of the foods that are easy on your tummy to help ensure you don’t miss out on a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Tip: Getting Over a Stomach Virus
-- After a gastrointestinal virus makes your stomach sensitive and you feel nauseated, avoid heavy foods that can worsen your symptoms. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests these easy-on-your-tummy foods: Bananas. Rice and plain... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 10, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Peeling into the health benefits of bananas
What's yellow, weighs more than 25?pounds and is something you'll likely have eaten?by the end of December? The answer: a year's supply of bananas. "The average American consumes 27 pounds of bananas per year," explains Angie Murad, a dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. "That averages out to 90 bananas per year." In [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - May 9, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Bananas tied to noose are found around university campus
The bananas were scrawled with the letters "AKA Free." AKA, or Alpha Kappa Alpha, is a predominately African-American sorority. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news