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Sensitive balance in immune system: How one molecule can affect health outcomes
The protein c-FLIPR plays a key role in controlling a 'cellular suicide' process named 'apoptosis.' Scientists have described the significance of c-FLIPR for the immune system in detail: In the presence of an excess of this molecule, mice can fight infectious diseases better, but they develop autoimmune diseases as they get older. The inhibitory effect of c-FLIPR on apoptosis is the underlying cause in both cases. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Sensitive balance in the immune system
(Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research) The protein c-FLIPR plays a key role in controlling a 'cellular suicide' process named 'apoptosis.' Scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research have described the significance of c-FLIPR for the immune system in detail: In the presence of an excess of this molecule, mice can fight infectious diseases better, but they develop autoimmune diseases as they get older. The inhibitory effect of c-FLIPR on apoptosis is the underlying cause in both cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 11, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Enhancement of Plasmid-Mediated Transgene Expression
A large number of studies aimed at the treatment of cancer, autoimmune and metabolic diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, allergic diseases, as well as muscle disorders strengthen the fact that gene therapy could represent an alternative method to treat human diseases where conventional approaches are less effective. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - April 10, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Support for Autoimmune-Epilepsy LinkSupport for Autoimmune-Epilepsy Link
A new population-based study provides more evidence of a significantly increased risk for epilepsy among patients with an autoimmune disease. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 7, 2014 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Studies on the T Cell Receptor (TCR) Revision of Autoantibody-Inducing CD4 T (aiCD4 T) Cell
Our recent studies into the role of autoantibody-inducing CD4 T cells in autoimmune disease have necessitated studies on the mechanism of TCR revision, a phenomenon that has been difficult to approach experimentally. Here we describe a detailed experimental technique to investigate the molecular events involved in TCR revision. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news

Characterization of Innate Immune Signalings Stimulated by Ligands for Pattern Recognition Receptors
The innate immunity is an essential step as the front line of host defense, and its aberrant activation particularly in response to nucleic acids is closely related to the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Characterization of the innate immune signalings may provide a pathophysiological insight for better understanding of human diseases. Nucleic acid-mediated activation of pattern recognition receptors triggers the activation of two major intracellular signaling pathways, which are dependent on NF-κB and interferon regulatory factors, transcriptional factors. This leads to the subsequent induction...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news

Mouse Model of Experimental Dermal Fibrosis: The Bleomycin-Induced Dermal Fibrosis
Relevant animal models are essential tools to investigate in depth the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder that affects particularly the skin. SSc is characterized by vasculopathy, immune disturbances, and fibrosis. Expression of each of the three pathologic features varies among SSc patients leading to disease heterogeneity and variable organ manifestations. Several animal models of SSc are available; however, some models display inflammation followed by fibrosis, whether some others primarily mimic autonomous fibroblast activation. Here, we describe the...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news

Genome-Wide Genetic Study in Autoimmune Disease-Prone Mice
Mouse models of autoimmune diseases provide invaluable insights into the cellular and molecular bases of autoimmunity. Genetic linkage studies focusing on their abnormal quantitative phenotypes in relation to the loss of self-tolerance will lead to the identification of polymorphic genes that play pivotal roles in the genetic predisposition to autoimmunity. In this chapter, we first overview the basic concepts in the statistical genetics and then provide guides to genotyping microsatellite DNA markers and to quantitative trait loci mapping using a MAPMAKER program. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news

Induction of De Novo Autoimmune Disease in Normal Mice upon Repeated Immunization with Antigen
We describe here a novel and completely reproducible experimental technique that can induce systemic autoimmunity or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in mice otherwise not prone to spontaneous autoimmune disease. This protocol involves the repeated immunization of mice with the same antigen. This rather simple technique enables us to perform exact and quantitative in vivo animal experiments with great accuracy. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news

Pulmonary hypertension deaths have increased over past decade, according to report
Deaths from pulmonary hypertension have increased over the past decade, according to a study. Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by increased blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries, causing the right side of the heart to work harder. Common causes of pulmonary hypertension include congestive heart failure, other heart diseases, birth defects of the heart, chronic lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and certain autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. The risk of pulmonary hypertension increases in older patients. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 3, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dear Anti-Vaxxers: You Want Pure Nature? OK, Die Young.
None of the New York parents who are refusing to vaccinate their children today were around the city in the summer of 1916, which is good for them and good for any of the kids they might have had. It was in that summer that 27,000 children nationwide were struck by a polio outbreak, 9,300 of them in New York. Of those 9,300 victims, 2,700 died. The Salk family at 116th St. and Madison Ave. escaped the scourge, meaning that their two-year-old son Jonas was spared. History notes that when he grew up, he had a little score-settling to do with the poliovirus. MoreHow One Small Town Lowered Their Teen Birth Rate‘Date Rape...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 2, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized anti-vaxxers epidemics health health policy Jenny McCarthy Jonas Salk measles New York City polio vaccines whooping cough Source Type: news

Celiac disease linked to increased risk of coronary artery disease
People with celiac disease may have a near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease compared with the general population, according to research. The study is the first to look at the association between celiac disease and coronary artery disease and adds to the evolving understanding of how systemic inflammation and autoimmune processes might influence cardiovascular disease development. Data also showed a slightly higher risk of stroke among people with celiac disease compared to controls. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 29, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

How rotavirus infection accelerates autoimmune diabetes in a mouse model
A combination of genetic predisposition and environmental factors is believed to cause autoimmune (type 1) diabetes. A new study gets at the mechanisms by which rotavirus infection contributes to autoimmune diabetes in a mouse model of the disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

How rotavirus infection accelerates autoimmune diabetes in a mouse model
(PLOS) A combination of genetic predisposition and environmental factors is believed to cause autoimmune (type 1) diabetes. A study published on March 27 in PLOS Pathogens gets at the mechanisms by which rotavirus infection contributes to autoimmune diabetes in a mouse model of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 27, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Multiple sclerosis patients may benefit from statins, says study
This study suggests, however, that the beneficial effect might be on vascular function rather than the immune system, he added. "After nearly two decades of research, it is immensely gratifying to see this work progress into the clinic to deliver benefits to patients," he said.MS is an autoimmune disease in which myelin, the fatty insulating material that covers nerve fibres, is destroyed by the body's own defences. Nerves lacking myelin are not able to transmit messages properly, leading to symptoms ranging from mild tingling or numbness to full blown paralysis.Dr Susan Kohlhaas, head of biomedical research at t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Tags: The Guardian Pharmaceuticals industry News UCL (University College London) Health Medical research Society Drugs Multiple sclerosis UK news Science Source Type: news

Statins may slow progression of MS
ConclusionThis was an early stage, phase II trial, which found that simvastatin reduced the rate of brain shrinkage in patients in the later stages of MS. The results are promising and warrant a larger phase III trial, examining whether the drug could slow the disease in patients at this stage of MS.  It should be noted that although simvastatin had some effect on outcomes in one disability scale and one symptom scale, the trial was primarily aimed at measuring the effect on brain shrinkage, rather than patients’ symptoms.To conclude, it is unclear what effect simvastatin, if any, would have on long-term quality...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Neurology Source Type: news

What are expectations that can come from the Accelerating Medicines Partnership?
Virginia Ladd - AMP Submitted by Julie on Mon, 03/17/2014 - 12:45 Autoimmune diseases affect 50 million Americans and are a leading cause of death and disability — yet we have no cure. Historically, the first goal of treatment is to reduce inflammation focusing on making quality of life as good as possible. However, more needs to be done on greater research options for all autoimmune disease-related patients. Share Email Print var switchTo5x = false;var __st_loadLate = true;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-e0d16a36-b72f-d97...
Source: PHRMA - March 17, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Julie Source Type: news

Leslie Hanrahan - AMP
We believe this initiative will ultimately lead to new understanding of the underlying causes of lupus along with new therapies for this disease and ultimately an improved quality of life for people living with lupus. For us it is all about the patient! Lupus is  complex and is arguably the most clinically diverse of all autoimmune diseases. Because of this, the scope of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP)  is tailor made for a collaborative effort among the NIH, industry, academic medical research centers and non profit organization. Lupus was selected for this project because of the lack of effective t...
Source: PHRMA - March 17, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Julie Source Type: news

James Sullivan - AMP
It's often said that baseball players have to generate 4 hits out of every 10 at-bats to be considered a Hall of Fame-caliber player.  Meteorologists are criticized for inaccurate forecasts more often than not.  But think about the drug development business: only one in every 5,000 to 10,000 compounds in drug discovery will make it through regulatory approval and even treatments that reach clinical trials only have a 16% chance of approval. (Source: Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development. "Large Pharma Success Rate for Drugs Entering Clinical Trials in 1993-2004: 16%." Impact Report 2009; innova...
Source: PHRMA - March 17, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Julie Source Type: news

Virginia Ladd - AMP
Autoimmune diseases affect 50 million Americans and are a leading cause of death and disability — yet we have no cure. Historically, the first goal of treatment is to reduce inflammation focusing on making quality of life as good as possible. However, more needs to be done on greater research options for all autoimmune disease-related patients. In existing research, 80-100 different autoimmune diseases have been identified and researchers suspect at least 40 additional diseases of having an autoimmune basis. These diseases are chronic and can be life-threatening. The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (...
Source: PHRMA - March 17, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Julie Source Type: news

Sanofi And UCB To Discover And Develop AutoImmune Drugs
Sanofi and UCB have entered into a strategic and scientific partnership to try to discover and develop novel anti-inflammatory small molecules for potential treatment of a broad range of immune-mediated diseases. (Source: Pharmaceutical Online News)
Source: Pharmaceutical Online News - March 12, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Organ transplant approach might end lifelong drug treatment
Organ-transplant recipients often reject donated organs, but a new, two-pronged strategy developed by UC San Francisco researchers to specifically weaken immune responses that target transplanted tissue has shown promise in controlled experiments on mice.The hope is that using this novel treatment strategy at the time of transplantation surgery could spare patients from lifelong immunosuppressive treatments and their side effects. The approach might also be used to treat autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, the researchers said. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 12, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Transplants / Organ Donations Source Type: news

B-cells aggravate autoimmune diseases
This study offers an additional explanation to how B-cells regulate an immune response.In Germany, approximately 800,000 people suffer from rheumatoid arthritis. In this progressive disease, a person's own immune system attacks and destroys connective tissue. However, the most important factors governing the progress of the disease are still unknown. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 10, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Immune System / Vaccines Source Type: news

Autoimmune diseases can be cured naturally
(Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 6, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

B-cells aggravate autoimmune diseases
This study offers an additional explanation to how B-cells regulate an immune response. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 5, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

B-cells aggravate autoimmune diseases
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Antibody producers regulate the immune response using a recently discovered mechanism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 5, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

“Autoimmune Disease Treatment,” a New Article on Vkool.Com, Teaches...
The new “Autoimmune Disease Treatment” writing on the website Vkool.com covers natural ways to treat autoimmune diseases effectively.(PRWeb February 26, 2014)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/autoimmune-disease/treatment/prweb11613961.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - February 27, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What are some realistic expectations that can come from the Accelerating Medicines Partnership?
Opinionconversations48254827Autoimmune diseases affect 50 million Americans and are a leading cause of death and disability — yet we have no cure. Historically, the first goal of treatment is to reduce inflammation focusing on making quality of life as good as possible. However, more needs to be done on greater research options for all autoimmune disease-related patients. In existing research, 80-100 different autoimmune diseases have been identified and researchers suspect at least 40 additional diseases of having an autoimmune basis. These diseases are chronic and can be life-threatening. The American Autoimmune Re...
Source: PHRMA - February 26, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Julie Source Type: news

Virginia T. Ladd
President & Executive Director, American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc. Virginia T. Ladd, R.T. – Virginia Ladd is the President and Executive Director of the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc. (AARDA), an organization that she founded to bring a national focus to autoimmunity and increase collaboration in autoimmune research, education, awareness, and advocacy. She has been involved in the nonprofit community for over 30 years as a patient advocate and educator. Mrs. Ladd served as president and executive director of the Lupus Foundation of America. Mrs. Ladd was instrumental in...
Source: PHRMA - February 26, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Julie Source Type: news

Schizophrenics at greater risk of getting diseases
People suffering from schizophrenia have an increased risk of contracting autoimmune diseases, especially if they have suffered from a severe infection, new research based on data sets covering the majority of the Danish population shows. With the aid of these large data sets, the researchers have been able to show certain correlations with great statistical certainty, but the study does not provide a definitive explanation for why schizophrenics have such an increased risk of contracting these diseases, except to suggest that lifestyle, genetics and the disease itself may contribute to the complicated situation. (Source: ...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 21, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Schizophrenics are at greater risk of getting diseases
(Aarhus University) New research based on data sets covering the majority of the Danish population shows that people suffering from schizophrenia have an increased risk of contracting autoimmune diseases, especially if they have suffered from a severe infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A Brain on Fire
In 2009, a young New York Post reporter contracted a brain infection and learned what it means to be alive, conscious, and not present in your own body. She also learned an important lesson about modern medical care.read more (Source: Psychology Today Personality Center)
Source: Psychology Today Personality Center - February 18, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Denise Cummins, Ph.D. Tags: Neuroscience Personality Philosophy Resilience autoimmune diseases brain on fire insanity new york post reporter nmda susannah cahalan Source Type: news

A Medical Mystery, a Reporter, and a Month of Madness
In 2009, a young New York Post reporter contracted a brain infection and learned what it means to be alive, conscious, and not present in your own body. She also learned an important lesson about modern medical care.read more (Source: Psychology Today Personality Center)
Source: Psychology Today Personality Center - February 18, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Denise Cummins, Ph.D. Tags: Neuroscience Personality Philosophy Resilience autoimmune diseases brain on fire insanity new york post reporter nmda susannah cahalan Source Type: news

What are our greatest challenges as we address managing chronic diseases like diabetes?
conversationsphrmapediaOpinion480448091404Despite many attempts by prominent researchers utilizing different approaches, there is no cure for diabetes. While continuing extensive research looking into “the cure”, much work is being conducted in the day –to- day management of diabetes. As such, it is essential to develop treatments that not only help measure and adjust blood glucose levels- thus preventing hyper and hypoglycemia, but also to improve the quality of life in our patients with diabetes. The amount of self care skills required to manage diabetes is extensive, requiring blood glucose monitoring,...
Source: PHRMA - February 11, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Julie Source Type: news

Quantibody Arrays for Tracking Patient Health
Neuromics is working with Dr. Joe Smarda, a renowned Immunologist, to track levels of cytokines in the blood serum of his clients. We have selected RayBiotech's Quantibody® Arrays for these assays. The Clinics in Joe's network treat his clients for autoimmune related disorders.Our regime is:Test clients pre-treatmentTreatTestRefine treatmentTest The specified treatment regime is continued until clients have blood serum cytokine levels that are in the range of our healthy controls. Here's data from our Quantibody® T-helper cell Cytokine Arrays (pre-treatment).Figures IL-6, IL-1 beta, MCP-1 and PAI1 Array r...
Source: Neuromics - February 10, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Tags: autoimmune disease. Rheumatoid Arthritis immune response inflammatory response Quantibody Arrays Raybiotech Source Type: news

Bifunctional Antibody Fragment-Based Fusion Proteins for the Targeted Elimination of Pathogenic T-Cell Subsets
Pathogenic effector T cells are key contributors to autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). General inhibition of T cells using, e.g., methotrexate, prednisolone, or TNF blockers, has prominent therapeutic effects frequently at the cost of severe long-term side effects and toxicity. Therefore, targeted strategies that can selectively inhibit or eliminate pathogenic T cells are sought after as a new approach to safely block perpetual inflammatory T-cell responses and inhibit concomitant progressive tissue destruction. Of particular interest in this respect is the use of the so-called single-chain fra...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - February 7, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Measurement of Malondialdehyde, Glutathione, and Glutathione Peroxidase in SLE Patients
Oxidative stress contributes to chronic inflammation of tissues and plays a central role in immunomodulation, which may lead to autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome. Markers of oxidative damage include malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant scavengers as glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px), which all correlate well with SLE disease activity. Amelioration of some clinical manifestations of SLE may be expected by targeting lipid peroxidation with dietary or pharmacological antioxidants. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - February 7, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Generation of Self-Peptides to Treat Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Synthetic peptides are attracting increasing attention as therapeutics. Despite their potential, however, only a few selected peptides have been able to enter in clinical trials for chronic autoimmune diseases and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in particular. Here, we describe and discuss a series of assays, which may help in characterizing valuable candidate peptides that were applied in our laboratory to develop the lupus P140 peptide program. The different steps of selection include the choice of the initial autoantigen, the design, synthesis and purification of peptides, their preliminary screen by measuring cytoki...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - February 7, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Detection of SLE Antigens in Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs)
Neutrophils are sentinel cells of the innate immune system with a primary role of clearing extracellular pathogens. The release of weblike structures decorated with granular proteins called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Indeed, NETs may represent an important source of autoantigens and immunostimulatory proteins in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this chapter, we describe protocols to isolate human peripheral neutrophils, to generate and isolate NETs, and to detect SLE antigens in NETs using immunofluorescence and immun...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - February 7, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Microarray Technology for Analysis of MicroRNA Expression in Renal Biopsies of Lupus Nephritis Patients
This article offers a technological overview of microarray technology for analysis of microRNA gene expression in kidney biopsies from SLE patients. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - February 7, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Laboratory Tests for the Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent vascular thrombosis (VT) and/or pregnancy morbidity (PM) in the presence of persistent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), detected by lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin (aCL) antibody, and/or anti‐β2 glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI) antibody assays. These aPL, considered to be diagnostic markers and pathogenic drivers of APS, are a heterogeneous group of antibodies directed against anionic phospholipids, phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, and phospholipid–protein complexes. Although APS is currently considered as a singl...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - February 7, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Evaluating a Particular Circulating MicroRNA Species from an SLE Patient Using Stem-Loop qRT-PCR
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease, and correct judgment of SLE activity is very important in guiding precise clinical treatment. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) could serve as potential biomarkers of disease activity or status in SLE, and here we describe a modified qRT-PCR method for detecting them. Stem loop has become one of the most powerful methods for determining miRNA expression because it is highly sensitive and accurate and requires only small amount of sample. In this chapter, we focus on a stem-loop reverse transcription-bound SYBR green qRT-PCR protocol for evaluating a particula...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - February 7, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Pathology of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: The Challenges Ahead
Many studies have explored the pathology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune rheumatic disorder with a striking female predominance. Numerous autoimmune phenomena are present in this disease, which ultimately result in organ damage. However, the specific cellular and humoral mechanisms underlying the immune dysfunction are not yet fully understood. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - February 7, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Recombinant Antibody Microarray for Profiling the Serum Proteome of SLE
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a severe autoimmune connective tissue disease. Our current knowledge about the serum proteome, or serum biomarker panels, reflecting disease and disease status is still very limited. Affinity proteomics, represented by recombinant antibody arrays, is a novel, multiplex technology for high-throughput protein expression profiling of crude serum proteomes in a highly specific, sensitive, and miniaturized manner. The antibodies are deposited one by one in an ordered pattern, an array, onto a solid support. Next, the sample is added, and any specifically bound proteins are detected and quan...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - February 7, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

NIH, industry and non-profits join forces to speed validation of disease targets
Goal is to develop new treatments earlier, beginning with Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, and autoimmune disorders. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 4, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Stem cell agency's grants to UCLA help set stage for revolutionary medicine
Scientists from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research were today awarded grants totaling more than $3.5 million by California's stem cell agency for their ongoing efforts to advance revolutionary stem cell science in medicine.   Recipients of the awards from the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) included Lili Yang ($614,400), who researches how stem cells become rare immune cells; Denis Evseenko ($1,146,468), who is studying the biological niche in which stem cells grow into cartilage; Thomas Otis and Bennet Novitch ($1,148,758), who are using new techni...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 29, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hanover Portfolio Acquisitions Changes Its Name to Endonovo Therapeutics
Endonovo Therapeutics, Inc. Is Developing Non-Invasive Treatments for Various Inflammatory, Autoimmune and Degenerative Diseases Using Time-Varying Electromagnetic Fields LOS ANGELES, CA--(Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) - Hanover Portfolio Acquis... Devices, Regenerative MedicineEndonovo Therapeutics, Time-Varying Electromagnetic Field (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - January 28, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Clinical Research Manager – EMD Serono, Billerica, USA
Added via Nature Jobs. EMD Serono, the biopharmaceutical division of Merck KGaA is seeking a Clinical Research Manager to work on therapeutic areas of neurodegenerative diseases, fertility and metabolic endocrinology, as well as oncology and autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. The successful applicant will write scientific rationale for clinical trial protocols, develop clinical development plans and liaise with external experts to accumulate scientific and medical knowledge to support these plans. The deadline for applications is 6 March 2014. For more information, please visit the job advert. (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - January 22, 2014 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Stem Cell Research at PMC Holds Great Potential
The Pacific Heart, Lung & Blood Institute in California is moving forward with potentially groundbreaking stem cell mesothelioma research that could dramatically change the treatment of this disease. While mesenchymal stem cells already are utilized in therapies for several autoimmune diseases, the novel research will explore using them for the first time as a vehicle to deliver molecular and gene therapies directly to mesothelioma sites. The goal is to develop a reliable therapy to provide consistent, long-term survival for pleural mesothelioma patients, which currently doesn't exist. The majority of meso...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 16, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Army medic exposed to uranium in race to raise £25,000 for treatment
Katrina Brown, 31, from Gloucestershire, developed a potentially fatal autoimmune disease after exposure to depleted uranium. She has just weeks left to raise funds. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news