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Unique Microbial Signature Identified in Systemic SclerosisUnique Microbial Signature Identified in Systemic Sclerosis
Patients with systemic sclerosis have an abundance of bacteria that perpetuate inflammation in other autoimmune disorders, such as Crohn's disease, and not as much commensal bacteria that protect. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatology News Source Type: news

Autoimmunity: New immunoregulation and biomarker
Clinicians have elucidated a mechanism involved in determining the lifespan of antibody-producing cells, and identified a promising new biomarker for monitoring autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and lupus erythematosus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Autoimmunity: New immunoregulation and biomarker
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) Clinicians at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have elucidated a mechanism involved in determining the lifespan of antibody-producing cells, and identified a promising new biomarker for monitoring autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and lupus erythematosus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Ticks can transmit a new Lyme-like disease
There are several good reasons to keep ticks off your body. One is that they are creepy and suck your blood. Another is that they can transmit 14 different diseases—not just Lyme disease. A report published online this week in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine describes the newest tick-borne disease in North America, which is caused by a bacterium known as Borrelia miyamotoi. The microbe was first identified in Japan in 1995. The first report of it infecting humans came from Russia in 2011. Cases began appearing in the northeastern United States in 2013. Borrelia miyamotoi is a spiral-shaped bacterium that is r...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - June 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Howard LeWine, M.D. Tags: Health Prevention Borrelia miyamotoi Lyme disease ticks Source Type: news

New Blood Test Could Quickly Reveal Complete Virus History
http://media.boston.cbslocal.com/CBSBOS_1006201517392700000AA.mp4 BOSTON (CBS) – Right now, if your doctor wants to know if you have the measles or HIV or the flu, they have to order one test for each virus. Imagine a day when you can go to your doctor’s office and with a simple prick of your finger, they can test for hundreds of different viruses at once. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School have developed an assay called VirScan that can determine which viruses a patient has been exposed to, perhaps 10 years or more in the past. Viruses like influenza, herpe...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mwschooley Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Harvard Medical School Brigham & Women's Hospital Dr. Mallika Marshall Stephen Elledge VirScan Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover molecular rules that govern autoimmune disorders
UCLA Engineering Bundles with the right DNA spacing can amplify immune response. An international team led by researchers at UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and California NanoSystems Institute has identified an unexpectedly general set of rules that determine which molecules can cause the immune system to become vulnerable to the autoimmune disorders lupus and psoriasis. The breakthrough, described in an article published today in the journal Nature Materials, could lead to new ways of treating the disorders. Led by Gerard C. L. Wong, a UCLA professor of bioengineering and chemistry w...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 8, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers expose how 'James Bond' cells are made
New research has revealed how immune cell 'spies' are created, providing clues on how the immune system could be manipulated to better fight disease. Dendritic cells are intelligence-gathering immune cells, gathering information on viruses, bacteria, cancer and fungi to aid the immune system in fighting disease. Understanding how dendritic cells are created will aid scientists in finding ways to boost the immune response to infections or dampen it in autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, experts say. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Test Shows Every Virus You've Ever Had — From One Drop Of Blood
While most blood tests can only identify one virus at a time, a new assay developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) can, using a single drop of blood, identify all viruses known to infect humans. The researchers believe the technology could prove useful in vaccine development, in the study of chronic illnesses, and in treating certain autoimmune diseases associated with cancer. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - June 8, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Drugs Against Autoimmune Diseases: Model Line From Bosch Comprises All Process Steps
At Achema, Bosch Packaging Technology presents an exemplary line encompassing all process steps for the production, filling and packaging of medicines against autoimmune diseases administered in syringes. (Source: Pharmaceutical Online News)
Source: Pharmaceutical Online News - June 8, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Researchers expose how 'James Bond' cells are made
(Walter and Eliza Hall Institute) New research from Australian and Singaporean scientists has revealed how immune cell 'spies' are created, providing clues on how the immune system could be manipulated to better fight disease.Dendritic cells are intelligence-gathering immune cells, gathering information on viruses, bacteria, cancer and fungi to aid the immune system in fighting disease. Understanding how dendritic cells are created will aid scientists in finding ways to boost the immune response to infections or dampen it in autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 8, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fate Therapeutics Enters Into Sponsored Research Agreement With Boston Children's Hospital to Develop Immunoregulatory Cell Therapy for Treatment of Autoimmune Diseases
(Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE))
Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE) - June 6, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Well: Think Like a Doctor: Strange Vision Solved!
Readers solve the real-life case of a young woman with wavy lines before her eyes and a series of tiny strokes. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - June 5, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: LISA SANDERS Tags: Eyes and Eyesight Doctors Autoimmune Diseases Stroke Think Like a Doctor Featured Immune System Source Type: news

Well: Think Like a Doctor: Strange Vision Solved!
Readers solve the real-life case of a young woman with wavy lines before her eyes and a series of tiny strokes. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LISA SANDERS Tags: Eyes and Eyesight Doctors Autoimmune Diseases Stroke Think Like a Doctor Featured Immune System Source Type: news

Well: Think Like a Doctor: Strange Vision Solved!
Readers solve the real-life case of a young woman with wavy lines before her eyes and a series of tiny strokes. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - June 5, 2015 Category: Nutrition Authors: LISA SANDERS Tags: Eyes and Eyesight Doctors Autoimmune Diseases Stroke Think Like a Doctor Featured Immune System Source Type: news

Nonprofits launch web campaign to raise awareness about scleroderma
Three North American nonprofit organizations that invest in scleroderma research are jointly trying to raise awareness about the autoimmune disorder. Their efforts include posting information and urging people to pledge to raise awareness about the disease on Facebook and Twitter channels... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - June 2, 2015 Category: Dermatology Tags: FPN News FPN Dermatology FPN Rare Diseases FPN Rheumatology IMN News RHEUM News RHEUM Lupus/Connective Tissue Diseases Source Type: news

Joint Pain - What causes it and how to stop it naturally
(NaturalNews) Joint pain can be caused by injury (including repetitive stress injuries); bacterial, viral, or fungal infections; or autoimmune disease. The pain may be restricted to one joint or affect multiple joints; it may migrate from one to another. Pain and other symptoms may... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gluten-Free Medication Guidelines
For those of us who suffer from seasonal allergies, springtime is synonymous with sinus troubles. As much as 30 percent of the world's population is estimated to suffer from seasonal allergies, also known as allergic rhinitis, and it can often lead to sinus infections. For many, these are easily remedied by antibiotics and a few days of rest. However, as I learned recently, the story doesn't end there for those who suffer from celiac disease. An autoimmune disease affecting approximately 1 in 133 Americans, celiac can be characterized by gastrointestinal issues along with depression, skin problems, and anemia. The only kn...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

My Daughter's Mysterious Illness -- And My Own
For TueNight.com by Allison Czarnecki (Photos: Courtesy Allison Czarnecki. Photos from left to right: Allison and her daughter as a baby, Allison's daughter in the hospital getting tests, Allison's daughter now; Photo collage: Helen Jane Hearn/TueNight.com) Exactly one year ago, my teenage daughter got sick. Really sick. One day, out of the blue, she woke up and couldn't get out of bed. Up to this point, my then 14-year-old daughter had been a wildly healthy, state-championship swimmer who played the cello in an honors orchestra, earned straight As in all her classes. She was heavily involved in leadership positions in...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hacking The Nervous System
(Photo: © Job Boot) One nerve connects your vital organs, sensing and shaping your health. If we learn to control it, the future of medicine will be electric.When Maria Vrind, a former gymnast from Volendam in the Netherlands, found that the only way she could put her socks on in the morning was to lie on her back with her feet in the air, she had to accept that things had reached a crisis point. “I had become so stiff I couldn’t stand up,” she says. “It was a great shock because I’m such an active person.”It was 1993. Vrind was in her late 40s and working two jobs, athletics coa...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hacking The Nervous System
(Photo: © Job Boot) One nerve connects your vital organs, sensing and shaping your health. If we learn to control it, the future of medicine will be electric.When Maria Vrind, a former gymnast from Volendam in the Netherlands, found that the only way she could put her socks on in the morning was to lie on her back with her feet in the air, she had to accept that things had reached a crisis point. “I had become so stiff I couldn’t stand up,” she says. “It was a great shock because I’m such an active person.”It was 1993. Vrind was in her late 40s and working two jobs, athletics coa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Protecting women from multiple sclerosis
An innocent mistake made by a graduate student in a lab who accidentally used male mice instead of female mice during an experiment, has led scientists to a novel discovery that offers new insight into why women are more likely than men to develop autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Protecting women from multiple sclerosis
(Northwestern University) An innocent mistake made by a graduate student in a Northwestern Medicine lab -- she accidentally used male mice instead of female mice during an experiment -- has led scientists to a novel discovery that offers new insight into why women are more likely than men to develop autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bob Saget Shines a Light on Scleroderma With Cool Comedy -- Hot Cuisine
In 1982, management consultant and former competitive figure skater, Sharon Monsky was diagnosed with scleroderma (in Latin "hard skin") a rare, potentially fatal disease that hardens the skin and internal organs and often strikes women of child-bearing age. Given two years to live, Sharon was shocked at how few, even in the medical community, were aware of the disease. Her response was to make possible what seemed impossible. She applied her business expertise to found the Scleroderma Research Foundation (S.R.F.), which, to date, has raised over 35 million dollars and provided medical breakthroughs through tirel...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Proteasome Inhibitors as Therapeutics of Autoimmune DiseasesProteasome Inhibitors as Therapeutics of Autoimmune Diseases
There may be a bright future for the use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Arthritis Research & Therapy (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatology Journal Article Source Type: news

New national study finds autoimmune disease severely impacts patients
(Health Union) In a new national survey of rheumatoid arthritis patients, Health Union found a severe impact on quality of life, employment, and ability to afford treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Compound has potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis
A new study outlines a chemical compound with potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that affects an estimated 1.3 million people in the world. Characterized by stiff, swollen joints, it's a progressive disease that occurs when the body's immune system attacks its own cells. Inflammation in the lining of the joints leads to loss of bone and cartilage. People who have rheumatoid arthritis lose mobility and joint function without adequate treatment. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

NHLBI Media Availability: New form of interleukin-2 could be fine-tuned to fight disease
Finding shows potential benefit to transplantation and autoimmune disease. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - May 19, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Multiple sclerosis: Scientists ID cause of movement, balance problems
(University of Virginia Health System) New research into the causes of the excessive inflammation that drives multiple sclerosis has identified a faulty 'brake' within immune cells, a brake that should be controlling the inflammation. This points to a potential target for developing new therapies to treat multiple sclerosis and could have important implications for other autoimmune diseases, such as the colon disease colitis and the chronic skin condition atopic dermatitis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Your Mysterious Nerve Pain Could Be Undiagnosed Celiac Disease, According To New Study
People with celiac disease are more than twice as likely to suffer from nerve damage than the general population, according to a recently published study in the medical journal JAMA Neurology. The association is so strong that the study authors suggest people with nerve damage should also be screened for celiac disorder in order to pinpoint potential treatment options, according to lead researcher Jonas Ludvigsson of the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet. "The current guidelines suggest that patients with neuropathy [nerve pain] should be screened for type 1 diabetes and certain vitamin deficiencies,...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 15, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New insight into inflammatory bowel disease may lead to better treatments
A newly discovered link between bacteria and immune cells sheds light on inflammatory bowel disease, an autoimmune condition that affects 1.6 million people in the United States, according to researchers. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the most common forms of IBD, an autoimmune condition that is thought to develop based on genetic and environmental factors. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 14, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Kineta expands as South Lake Union's biotech scene continues to grow
Yet another Seattle biotech company is growing. Kineta, which develops treatments for psoriasis, pain, viral and autoimmune diseases, has expanded into a new building right up the street from its existing space in Seattle's hottest tech and biotech neighborhood. The company expanded three weeks ago from its 10,000-square-foot South Lake Union office at 219 Terry Ave. N. and leased part of a floor at 401 Terry Ave. N. Kineta now occupies another 6,000 square feet at the new location, where nonprofit… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 13, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Annie Zak Source Type: news

The Unexpected Reason We Tend To Be Healthier In The Summer
By: Agata Blaszczak-Boxe Published: May 12, 2015 01:05pm ET on LiveScience. The activity of human genes changes with the seasons, and with it, immunity changes too, according to a new study. Seasonal changes in gene activity mean that the immune system revs up inflammation in the winter, researchers found. This may help explain why the symptoms of inflammation-related conditions — such as heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis — often worsen in winter, and why people tend to generally be healthier in the summer. "Our results indicate that, in the modern environment, the increase in the pro-inflammat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study finds seasons may affect immune system activity
ConclusionThis research found seasonal variations in gene expression in one type of white blood cell. Some genes became more active in the summer months, while others became more active in the winter. For example, one gene involved in the body's anti-inflammation response was increased during the summer, while some involved in inflammation were increased in the winter. The researchers also found seasonal variation in the numbers of each type of white cell. These patterns were different in samples taken from people in the UK, compared with people from The Gambia.Because of the observational nature of each study, it is not p...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

New insight into inflammatory bowel disease may lead to better treatments
(Washington University School of Medicine) A newly discovered link between bacteria and immune cells sheds light on inflammatory bowel disease, an autoimmune condition that affects 1.6 million people in the United States, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

National Briefing | Washington: F.D.A. Proposal Would End Ban on Blood Donation
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday released its proposal for scrapping a decades-old lifetime ban on blood donation by gay and bisexual men. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - May 13, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: SABRINA TAVERNISE Tags: Blood Donation Autoimmune Diseases Food and Drug Administration Homosexuality and Bisexuality Source Type: news

National Briefing | Washington: F.D.A. Proposal Would End Ban on Blood Donation
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday released its proposal for scrapping a decades-old lifetime ban on blood donation by gay and bisexual men. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SABRINA TAVERNISE Tags: Blood Donation Autoimmune Diseases Food and Drug Administration Homosexuality and Bisexuality Source Type: news

Trigger identified that likely unleashes autoimmune disease
Researchers believe they have discovered a group of cells that trigger autoimmune disease, as well as the molecular 'trigger guard' that normally holds them in check. These previously undetected cells are renegade versions of the cells that make the 'high affinity' antibodies required for long-term immunity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Welcome To My World, Dr. Oz
Dr. Oz and I must be doing something right – otherwise, we wouldn’t incur the wrath of the medical establishment, Big Pharma and Big Agra. Recently, 10 doctors lobbied Columbia University to oust celebrity physician Mehmet Oz from the distinguished university’s hospital and its department of health sciences and medicine. In a letter to the department’s dean of faculty, the doctors attacked him for presenting alternative and natural cures on his syndicated TV program, The Dr. Oz Show. They also chastised him for being concerned about genetically modified crops. Welcome to my world, Dr. Oz. Since grad...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 12, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr. Al Sears Tags: Nutrition DHA Dr. Oz Show EPA omega 3 Source Type: news

A trigger that likely unleashes autoimmune disease
(Garvan Institute of Medical Research) Australian researchers believe they have discovered a group of cells that trigger autoimmune disease, as well as the molecular 'trigger guard' that normally holds them in check. These previously undetected cells are renegade versions of the cells that make the 'high affinity' antibodies required for long-term immunity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Infection clue points to causes of rheumatoid arthritis
ConclusionThrough a series of laboratory experiments, this research pinpointed a protein called vinculin as an important autoimmune target in rheumatoid arthritis.Much of the media reporting focused on the idea that being exposed to bacteria with the same target sequence as vinculin might sensitise someone to develop the disease later. The research team did discuss how infection might lower the threshold at which the T cells are activated to self-attack and might prime the immune system for self-attack. While this is plausible, it was not proved to be the case in this study, so this is largely speculative.This research fur...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Source Type: news

Discovery could help reverse glucocorticoid resistance in some young leukemia patients
Scientists have identified a mechanism that helps leukemia cells resist glucocorticoids, a finding that lays the foundation for more effective treatment of cancer and possibly a host of autoimmune diseases. The research focused on glucocorticoids, a class of steroid hormones. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Discovery could help reverse glucocorticoid resistance in some young leukemia patients
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a mechanism that helps leukemia cells resist glucocorticoids, a finding that lays the foundation for more effective treatment of cancer and possibly a host of autoimmune diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

'Safe' low doses of mercury linked to autoimmune disease, children still injected!
(NaturalNews) When it comes to mercury contamination of seafood, scientists and environmentalists ring the alarm, warning consumers that eating too much fish can expose the body to toxic amounts of mercury.When it comes to mercury in vaccines, however, it's a much different story... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel Drug Ups Function in Patients With LEMS
(MedPage Today) -- Amifampridine phosphate slowed disease worsening in autoimmune neuromuscular disorder. (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - April 27, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Potential new treatment for multiple sclerosis
Scientists have discovered a way to prevent the development of multiple sclerosis in mice. Using a drug that blocks the production of a certain type of immune cell linked to inflammation and autoimmunity, the researchers successfully protected against the onset of MS in an animal model of the disease. The scientists say the next step is to test this strategy using other autoimmune disorders. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Truth About Gluten
Health crazes and diet trends may come and go, but every so often there are advances in the nutrition and medical field that are true game changers. For decades, individuals diagnosed with celiac disease were simply characterized with ghastly gastrointestinal problems, but with further research, this multisystemic autoimmune disorder is now known to be caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, predominantly found in genetically-susceptible individuals. Gluten is the main storage protein of wheat, rye and barley. While gluten is mainly found in foods, shockingly it is even an ingredient in everyday products such as medicin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

RA Commercials... Really?
photo courtesy of morguefile.com http://www.thediaryofanalzheimerscaregiver.com I am sure you have seen them... they are on every 20 minutes it seems, those commercials for a new RA miracle drug. They usually star a woman running around doing everything from building playgrounds to cooking a 10-course meal for her family. RA is hard enough to deal with, people just don't understand it. They hear "arthritis" and you get, "Oh, I have that in my knee," or "My grandma had that," etc. Arthritis is one thing, Rheumatoid Arthritis is a whole other ballgame. I don't understand how the word "a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New gene therapy success in a rare disease of the immune system
The efficacy of gene therapy treatment for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome has been demonstrated by researchers. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is a rare congenital immune and platelet deficiency which is X-linked and has an estimated prevalence of 1/250,000. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the WAS protein (WASp) expressed in hematopoietic cells. This disease, which primarily affects boys, causes bleeding, severe and recurrent infections, severe eczema and in some patients autoimmune reactions and the development of cancer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

In Search of Answers for Those Struggling With Infertility
Dr. Erin Wolff peers into a microscope in her lab at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Through the magnifying lens, she examines an egg from the ovary of one of her patients, a young woman with a rare autoimmune disease called GATA2 deficiency. The patient is about to undergo chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant, the only known treatment for her disease and one that will likely damage her ovaries, rendering her infertile. Dr. Wolff has extracted some of her eggs so that one day, through in vitro fertilization, the patient may have the chance to become a mother. "That is why I went into this line of me...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Immune system protein regulates sensitivity to bitter taste
(Monell Chemical Senses Center) New research from the Monell Center reveals that tumor necrosis factor, an immune system regulatory protein that promotes inflammation, also helps regulate sensitivity to bitter taste. The finding may provide a mechanism to explain the taste system abnormalities and decreased food intake that can be associated with infections, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 21, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news