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A biventricular repair for Jayce ’s one-of-a-kind heart
Amanda Mattioli was working in Afghanistan as a government contractor and had just completed a whirlwind round of travel to three separate continents when she learned she was pregnant. The helicopter unit that took her back to the main base so she could return home for her pregnancy gave her a unit sticker to commemorate her baby’s first helicopter ride. Little did she know it would also mark the beginning of a much longer journey for her and her son, William “Jayce” James. Amanda got her first hint the ride would be bumpy at her 20-week ultrasound, when she learned Jayce’s heart was on the right si...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 14, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories atrioventricular canal Biventricular Repair Biventricular Repair Program Dr. Gerald Marx Dr. Pedro del Nido Heterotaxy syndrome Pulmonary atresia transposition of the great arteries Source Type: news

Nathaniel ’s heart: One for the record books
As 3-year-old Nathaniel Wesley nervously watched the big machine move toward his chest, he spotted a familiar face: It was the cartoon character Barney — in sticker form. “Give Barney a kiss!” his parents urged, and he smiled at the friendly purple dinosaur while the scanner took images of blood flow in his lungs. Now 11, Nathaniel is no stranger to doctors, nurses or hospitals. Born with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia — a severe congenital heart defect — he’s been a frequent visitor to the Heart Center at Boston Children’s Hospital for the past eight years. In this dis...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 19, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program Dr. David Brown Dr. Janice Ware Dr. John Mayer Dr. Naomi Gauthier Heart Center tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia Source Type: news

An ocean away: Care for laryngeal cleft brings Clara to Boston
My husband, Duncan, and I were living in London, England, when Clara was born. Although my pregnancy had started out like any other, I later developed severe polyhydramnios, an accumulation of amniotic fluid that can sometimes indicate the presence of certain congenital issues. After I delivered, it became clear that Clara had a congenital condition called esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF). This condition meant that her esophagus (the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach) hadn’t developed properly and didn’t connect to her stomach, but that her esophagus and windpipe wer...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 11, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Natascha Kiernan Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Airway Disorders Dr. Reza Rahbar laryngeal cleft Source Type: news

Real Stories Of Americans Who Will Be Affected By The Proposed Changes To The ACA — And What YOU Can Do To Fight
With the proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), 20 million Americans are at risk of losing their health care coverage. A survey, conducted by Brunswick Partners, found that “75 percent of Americans agree that the proposed changes to Medicaid in the AHCA are a bad idea. And that we should not allow 14 million Americans to become uninsured even if there is a potential to reduce Medicaid spending. These results are significant because they find majorities of Americans identifying as conservatives (55 percent), moderates (82 percent) and liberals (90 percent) are opposed to the AHCA’s Medicaid pro...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Miles to go: From Mississippi to Boston for life-saving care
Whether he’s riding with his family on their all-terrain vehicle (ATV) at home in Mississippi, learning how to fish or playing with his cousins, Ethan Claborn is happiest when he’s outdoors. Simple things like a blade of grass or drop of rain are even more special for this almost four-year-old, considering he spent the first year of his life within hospital walls. Ethan’s parents, Holly and Gary, knew even before he was born that he would face several health challenges. But it still felt like a shock when, not long after birth, he was rushed into surgery to treat an intestinal blockage. Diagnosed with ile...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Biren Modi Dr. Mark Puder ileal atresia Omegaven total parenteral nutrition Source Type: news

Sharing biliary atresia — and strength to beat it
Everywhere Melissa Villaseñor goes her little sister, Isabella, follows. The 6- and 2-year-olds share just about everything. They share big personalities. They share a love of being lively and loud. And, they also share something else — they were both born with biliary atresia. “I am not going to lie,” says Andrea Torre, the girls’ mom. “I sometimes break down and cry and ask myself, ‘Why me?’” Biliary atresia is a chronic, progressive liver condition that is fatal if left untreated. For most parents, having just one child with this rare, life-threatening disease is ov...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 14, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories biliary atresia Dr. Heung-Bae Kim Dr. Khashavar Vakili Liver transplant Liver Transplant Program Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

FDA approval granted to pediatric device used to treat esophageal birth defect
(University of Chicago Medical Center) The US Food and Drug Administration has granted authorization for a magnetic device used to treat pediatric esophageal atresia, a birth defect that causes abnormal formation of the esophagus. The Flourish ™ Pediatric Esophageal Atresia device was created by University of Chicago Medicine assistant professor of radiology Mario Zaritzky, MD, in collaboration with Cook Medical. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for May 15, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. HRS 2017 Roundup: Study pinpoints battery issue in Abbott’s Nanostim leadless pacer A study of the Nanostim leadless pacemaker Abbott acquired this year when it bought St. Jude Medical, presented last week at the annual H...
Source: Mass Device - May 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Cook Medical wins FDA nod for Flourish pediatric surgery device
Cook Medical won FDA approval for its Flourish pediatric esophageal atresia anastomosis device, which is designed to treat infants with a birth defect that causes a gap in the esophagus. Babies born with esophageal atresia cannot feed normally and need a feeding tube until surgery is performed to attach the esophagus to the stomach. The device, which is the 1st of its kind, uses magnets to pull the upper and lower esophagus together, closing the gap. It is not indicated for use in infants who have an abnormal connection between the esophagus and windpipe, also known as a tracheoesophageal fistula. “This new device pr...
Source: Mass Device - May 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Surgical Wall Street Beat Cook Medical Source Type: news

New Device Approved for Esophageal Birth Defect
MONDAY, May 15, 2017 -- A new medical device has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat esophageal atresia, a birth defect that causes a gap between the esophagus and stomach. One of 2,500 babies in the United States is... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Experience Journal: From Venezuela for the chance to live
At five months old, Diana was diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, a congenital heart defect (CHD) that couldn’t be treated in her home country of Venezuela. “Being told that your child has no chance of surviving is devastating,” says Diana’s mom, Alejandra. “We were given no hope.” Research into where in the world Diana would receive the best treatment led her parents to the Heart Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. Throughout Diana’s journey to health, Alejandra relied on support from her husband, her sisters and the com...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories congenital heart defect Dr. Pedro del Nido Experience Journal Heart Center Source Type: news

FDA Clears First-of-Its-Kind Device for Esophageal Atresia FDA Clears First-of-Its-Kind Device for Esophageal Atresia
The Flourish Pediatric Esophageal Atresia Anastomosis device uses magnets to pull the upper and lower esophagus together, closing the gap and allowing food to enter the stomach.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Alert Source Type: news

FDA authorizes use of new device to treat esophageal birth defect in babies
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today authorized use of the Flourish Pediatric Esophageal Atresia Anastomosis, a first-of-its-kind medical device to treat infants up to one year old for a birth defect that causes a gap in their esophagus, called esophageal atresia. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - May 12, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

FDA Authorizes Use of New Device to Treat Esophageal Birth Defect in Babies
May 12, 2017 -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today authorized use of the Flourish Pediatric Esophageal Atresia Anastomosis, a first-of-its-kind medical device to treat infants up to one year old for a birth defect that causes a gap in their... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 12, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Prenatal diagnosis sets James up for success
I remember it like yesterday. Pregnant with my first child, I went to my 9-week scheduled ultrasound not really knowing what to expect. I heard a little baby’s heartbeat in my belly! I was blown away. When you go for your 18-week ultrasound, make sure your baby’s heart is checked. A simple scan can change everything. ~ Elizabeth At the 18-week scan, it appeared that the baby only had one kidney. The doctor seemed to think that everything else was normal, but he told me I had the option to make an appointment at Boston Children’s Hospital for a fetal echocardiogram. My husband had to work that da...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 2, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Elizabeth Swift Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Andrew Powell Fetal Cardiology Program Francis Fynn-Thompson Heart Center Pulmonary atresia Tetralogy of Fallot tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia ultrasound Source Type: news

Kimmel announcement shines light on heart condition
When Jimmy Kimmel revealed his son Billy was born with a heart problem, it was the first time many of his viewers?had heard the complicated medical terms used to describe it. "Billy was born with a heart disease, something called tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia," Kimmel said on his?late-night talk show. "Basically, the pulmonary [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - May 2, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

What Causes Hyperammonemia?
Discussion Reye’s syndrome (RS)is named for Dr. Douglas Reye who along with Drs. G. Morgan and J. Baral described encephalopathy and fatty accumulation and degeneration in children in a 1963 Lancet article. RS usually affects children but can occur at all ages. All organs can be affected but the liver and brain are primarily affected causing liver failure and encephalopathy as toxic metabolites (especially ammonia) accumulate, and intracranial hypertension and cerebral edema occurs. As the ammonia levels begin to rise (> 100 mg/dL) patients lose their appetite, have nausea and emesis and mental status changes whic...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Biostage prices $8m offering for bioengineered organ implant
Biostage (NSDQ:BSTG), a 27-person biotech based in Holliston, Mass., is developing technology to regrow esophageal tissue in patients that have esophageal cancer or atresia. Last week, the company priced a public offering at ¢40 per share of common stock, expecting to bring in $8 million from the round. The current standard of care for resectable esophageal cancer is complex – surgeons pull a piece of a patient’s stomach or intestine and reposition it in the chest to become the replacement esophagus. However, the procedure comes with a mortality rate that can be as a high as 19% at 90 days, according to Bi...
Source: Mass Device - February 15, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Funding Roundup Regenerative Medicine Wall Street Beat Biostage Source Type: news

Anal Atresia in a Neonate
A newborn male is seen with anal atresia. Isolated finding? Or, first clue? (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - January 19, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Richard Sidlow, MD Tags: Quiz Source Type: news

Man Opts To Receive Liver From Donor With Hepatitis C After First Transplant Fails
BOSTON (CBS) – After his first transplant failed, 26-year old Ben Blake was in need of another liver and fast. So he made the courageous decision to take one that is infected with a treatable disease in order to save his life. “Ben is my only son and he was very sick at birth,” says Duane Blake. Ben, had biliary atresia, a rare disease that eventually causes liver failure. At just seven months of age, he needed a liver transplant. “Every day was really a blessing and a gift,” says Duane. But by the end of college, Ben’s donor liver began to fail and he started to waste away. He...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dr. Mallika Marshall Liver Transplant Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: 8-Year-Old in Urgent Need of Liver Transplant
[The Herald] AN EIGHT-YEAR-OLD Masvingo baby is in urgent need of help to undergo a liver transplant in India as more minors continue to be diagnosed of severe Jaundice (Liver Cirrhosis and Biliary Atresia).Thayel Makatendeka Botsa (pictured right with her mother) requires $50 000 to cover medication and travel expenses. The baby's mother Mrs Adelaide Botse said Thayel was first diagnosed of severe Jaundice soon after her birth in March this year. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 7, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Father captures powerful photos of his four-year-old daughter proudly showing off her 'battle scars' after receiving a life-saving liver transplant  
Indi Warner was born with Biliary Atresia and had to undergo a liver transplant at just seven months old. Now four, the plucky Sydney youngster wears her battle scars with pride. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High Mortality Among Young Children Awaiting Liver Transplantation High Mortality Among Young Children Awaiting Liver Transplantation
Young children awaiting liver transplantation, mostly for biliary atresia (BA), face"unacceptably high" rates of wait-list and early post-liver-transplant mortality, according to a 10-year United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) review.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - November 9, 2016 Category: Surgery Tags: Transplantation News Source Type: news

Family Rallies Behind Infant In Desperate Need Of Liver Transplant
BOSTON (CBS) — At Boston Children’s Hospital organ transplant floor, 7-month-old Gabriella puts on a brave smile even though she’s fighting for her life. “We are trying to keep hope. We are doing our best for her,” her mother Meghan Stuart said. Gabby has Biliary Atresia, a liver disease that develops shortly after birth. Gabby’s is now advanced and she’s in desperate need of a liver transplant. “Unfortunately, this is a disease if it gets to this point can be fatal for her if it progresses any longer without a liver transplant,” Boston Children’s Hospital Liver S...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Boston Children's Hospital CBS Boston WBZ Source Type: news

Two-year-old twin makes history after receiving hospital ’s 300th heart transplant
The cookies for Dean Andersen’s welcome-home celebration were decorated with “#300,” fitting for the two-year-old who, just six weeks earlier, received the 300th heart transplant performed at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Dean does things in his own time and in his own way,” says his mom, Janet Andersen. “His transplant was no exception.” The Boston Children’s Heart Transplant Program performed its first transplant in 1986, and this May marked the program’s 30th anniversary. Dean’s transplant in June was yet another reason for celebration. “Milestones l...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 13, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories congenital heart defect Dr. Elizabeth Blume heart failure heart transplant Heart transplant program Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Pulmonary atresia Source Type: news

Father who gave his baby a transplant urges others to become organ donors
Allie Driva, from Los Angeles, was diagnosed with biliary atresia, causing her liver to fail. She was saved after her father Ryan, 30, was found to be a match and donated part of his organ. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What is a Hydrocoele of the Spermatic Cord?
Discussion Hydrocoeles are common anatomic variations caused by the incomplete obliteration of the processus vaginalis. The processus vaginalis is a peritoneal remnant that follows the testis and spermatic cord into the scrotum as the testis descends into the scrotum during development. As the processus vaginalis traverses from the testis back to the peritoneum, a hydrocoele can occur at any point along its length. The obliteration of the processus vaginalis occurs with the closure at the internal inguinal ring, followed by closure just above the testes with atresia of the area in between. The closure of the area around th...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 22, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

‘What a difference a year makes’: Catching up with liver brothers Brent and Malambo
Brent and Malambo We are honored U.S. News & World Report has named Boston Children’s Hospital the #1 pediatric hospital in the U.S. As we celebrate this honor, we’re reflecting on some of the greatest children’s stories ever told — stories of the patients and families whose lives touch ours and inspire us. Two of those patients are “liver brothers” Malambo Mazoka-Tyler and Brent Groder. Malambo and Brent are, by all standards, oceans apart. Zambian-born Malambo is nearly two. His world, one year after a life-saving, split-liver transplant, is all about walking and talking,...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 29, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories biliary atresia cystic fibrosis liver failure Liver transplant Liver Transplant Program Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) split-liver transplant Source Type: news

A salute to Noah’s heroes
Noah Hamm has escaped death more times than his mother Danielle can count. And he’s only 3. Since Noah was born there have been three constants in his life: Noah’s knack for near misses, his family and a neonatologist/pulmonologist who’s always there with the right care for Noah … and the right words for his family. “I tell Larry [Dr. Larry Rhein] he’s our George Bailey,” says Noah’s mom Danielle DiBenedetto. Larry gave me hope. Even when things were bad, I always felt better when Larry was there. Noah was a 29-week twin when Danielle’s water broke prematurely. “...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 25, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Anne Hansen Dr. Larry Rhein Dr. Reza Rahbar Dr. Terry Buchmiller esophageal atresia laryngeal cleft patent ductus arteriosus tracheoesophageal fistula Source Type: news

What Causes Vomiting?
Discussion Regurgitation is a passive expulsion of ingested material out of the mouth. It is a normal part of digestion for ruminants such as cows and camels. Nausea is an unpleasant abdominal perception that the person may describe as feeling ill to the stomach, or feeling like he/she is going to vomit. Anorexia is frequently observed. Nausea is usually associated with decreased stomach activity and motility in the small intestine. Parasympathetic activity may be increased causing pale skin, sweating, hypersalivation and possible vasovagal syndrome (hypotension and bradycardia). Retching or dry heaves is when there are sp...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 2, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Minimally Invasive Surgery in Neonatal Patients: A Review
Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgery have gradually become accepted diagnostic and therapeutic modalities in the management of neonatal surgical conditions. In the hands of experienced surgeons, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has reduced the need for open procedures. In children younger than 1 year, the advantages of MIS are evident in avoiding the sequelae of open surgery. MIS has shown outcomes comparable to those with open surgery. The recent literature in the PubMed database was reviewed, using the keywords "minimally invasive surgery," "neonatology," "pediatric surgery," "laparos...
Source: NeoReviews recent issues - May 1, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lopez, J., Stringel, G. Tags: Pediatric Drug Labeling Update Articles Source Type: news

Harriet Summerhill born with half a heart survives major cardiac surgery
Emma Summerhill and her husband Leighton, 35, from South Wales, were told at their baby's 20 week scan that she had pulmonary atresia - a deadly congenital heart defect. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The girl born with half a heart: Two-year-old who survived major cardiac surgery defies doctors to celebrate birthday they never thought she'd see
Emma Summerhill and her husband Leighton, 35, from South Wales, were told at their baby's 20 week scan that she had Pulmonary Atresia - a deadly congenital heart defect. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liver brothers: Two lives linked by split-liver transplant
It is late in the evening on June 14, 2015. Kern Tyler and his wife Pasina Mazoka-Tyler sit in a waiting room at Boston Children’s Hospital, while their 11-month-old son Malambo Mazoka-Tyler, born with a life-threatening disease called biliary atresia, undergoes a liver transplant. To arrive at this moment, they have traveled vast distances, visited multiple hospitals, sought the advice and counsel of numerous doctors, packed all their belongings and moved more than 7000 miles from their home in Zambia, Africa, to Boston, Massachusetts. He had picked out what he wanted to wear, where he wanted to be buried, and ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories biliary atresia cystic fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Center end-stage liver disease Heung Bae Kim Khashayar Vakili liver failure Liver transplant Liver Transplant Program Rima Fawaz Split liver transplantation Source Type: news

Liver brothers: Two lives linked by split-liver transplant
It is late in the evening on June 14, 2015. Kern Tyler and his wife Pasina Mazoka-Tyler sit in a waiting room at Boston Children’s Hospital, while their 11-month-old son Malambo Mazoka-Tyler, born with a life-threatening disease called biliary atresia, undergoes a liver transplant. To arrive at this moment, they have traveled vast distances, visited multiple hospitals, sought the advice and counsel of numerous doctors, packed all their belongings and moved more than 7000 miles from their home in Zambia, Africa, to Boston, Massachusetts. He had picked out what he wanted to wear, where he wanted to be buried, and ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories biliary atresia cystic fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Center end-stage liver disease Heung Bae Kim Khashayar Vakili liver failure Liver transplant Liver Transplant Program Rima Fawaz Split liver transplantation Source Type: news

I Am My Mother's Chimera. Chances Are, So Are You.
For years the concept of a "genetic chimera" -- an individual with two genetically distinct cells lines in his/her body -- has sparked the imagination of writers: from Stephen King to Michael Crichton, from CSI to The Office. The idea that an individual could harbor his/her own twin is creepy and intriguing at the same time. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have allowed us to probe much deeper into a person's genome, to the point that today scientists believe that chimerism could be far more common than what we originally thought. Chances are, you could be your own twin. But how surprised would you ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

I Am My Mother's Chimera. Chances Are, So Are You.
For years the concept of a "genetic chimera" -- an individual with two genetically distinct cells lines in his/her body -- has sparked the imagination of writers: from Stephen King to Michael Crichton, from CSI to The Office. The idea that an individual could harbor his/her own twin is creepy and intriguing at the same time. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have allowed us to probe much deeper into a person's genome, to the point that today scientists believe that chimerism could be far more common than what we originally thought. Chances are, you could be your own twin. But how surprised would you b...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

In their own words: Six families share the impact of organ donation
This is the season for gratitude and giving, a time to celebrate friends, family, the end of one year and the beginning of a new one. But for a select group, it also is a time to celebrate one of the greatest gifts — the gift of life through organ donation. Mickey was born with a unique combination of congenital heart defects and spent most of his early life at Boston Children’s. He was one day shy of 6 months old when he received his heart transplant, and his family is grateful for every day since. “Mickey has shown us what courage and resiliency look like, and his transplant has taught us the true mean...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 5, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Michelle Higginson Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories double lung transplant heart transplant hepatoblastoma kidney transplant Liver transplant multivisceral transplant Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

Marissa’s story: “Esophageal atresia is never going to define me”
Marissa Waite lives in the smallest town in Massachusetts, but she has a big story to tell. When her mother Vicky was pregnant with Marissa 13 years ago, an ultrasound detected esophageal atresia (EA), a condition where the esophagus isn’t connected to the stomach. Vicky was admitted to Brigham and Women’s Hospital for the remainder of her pregnancy. “I’m a take-charge kind of person. When I was pregnant, I thought, ‘I’ll make all the decisions for my baby.’ But when complications arose, I realized I couldn’t make these kinds of decisions alone,” she says. At that point...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 13, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: All posts Our patients’ stories esophageal atresia GERD Steven Fishman VSD Wayne Tworetzky Source Type: news

Small Study Affirms Accuracy of Free Mobile App That Screens for Liver Disease in Newborns - 7/29/15
In a small study, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center report they have verified the ability of a free smartphone app to accurately read, interpret and record the color of a newborn’s poop as a possible early symptom of biliary atresia (BA) — a rare disorder that accounts for nearly half of pediatric end-stage liver disease in the United States. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 29, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Meet Ryan: The boy who grew his own esophagus
Dr. Rusty Jennings, Ryan Page, Dr. John Foker Eleven-year-old Ryan Page is a budding trombone player whose favorite foods include candy, popcorn and hot dogs. “Ryan loves any choking hazard,” jokes his mother Tracy. When Ryan was born, few would have predicted he would be able tolerate these foods or master the trombone. “His doctors told us he had the longest gap they had ever seen in a baby with esophageal atresia,” recalls Tracy. Ryan was born with a nearly 4-inch gap between the top and bottom parts of his esophagus. “This is a kid whose predestination based on standard therapy was chronic...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 17, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our patients’ stories Advanced Fetal Care Center Dr. John Foker Dr. Rusty Jennings esophageal atresia Esophageal Atresia Treatment Center G-tube Source Type: news

Meet Phoebe: Swimmer, soccer player, gymnast and liver transplant recipient
Whether she’s tearing across the soccer field, sticking a near perfect landing in a gymnastics routine or training for an upcoming swim meet, Phoebe Root is always on the go. As her father, David, shuttles his active 12-year-old daughter to and from meets, games and competitions, he almost can’t believe it’s the same girl who, at 8 weeks old, was diagnosed with a potentially life-threatening liver disorder. “Looking back at how sick she was, I never would have guessed our lives would end up feeling so… normal,” says David, as he drove his daughter to an afternoon swim practice. “W...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 30, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tripp Underwood Tags: Our patients’ stories liver failure Liver transplant Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

Full circle: Transplant recipient returns as a transplant nurse
Laurie Lukianov has a more extensive medical history than most people would accumulate in several lifetimes. She spent most of her childhood in a hospital, and remarkably, that’s where the 26-year-old nursing student wants to spend her career. “There is no question in my mind,” she says. “Since I was 3 years old, I wanted to be a nurse.” Born with biliary atresia—a life-threatening liver condition in which the bile duct to the small intestine becomes blocked—Laurie underwent two liver transplants by age 13. Due to her long history of health problems, Laurie has had to overcome more...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 10, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our patients’ stories liver failure Liver transplant living donor Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

Newborn baby in need of life-saving transplant is saved by mother's twin sister who donated part of her own liver to save her tiny niece 
Star Reader underwent a liver transplant taken from her aunt Shanell's organ in November after being diagnosed with Biliary Atresia within days of being born in Barnsley, West Yorkshire. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Infant leaves UCLA’s Mattel hospital for home with a transplanted heart
Staff at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA witnessed a happy ending today instead of what could have easily been a tragic one when they bid farewell to five-week-old Drayvn Johnson, who went home with his mother, Nicole Eggleston, and two older brothers after becoming the hospital’s second youngest heart transplant recipient. He was only 23 days old when he received his new heart, which was the size of a strawberry. “All of our heart transplant patients are special, but I think this one was special because we knew there was a risk we might not find a donor in time,” said Dr. Juan Alejos, professo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 11, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Baby with rare condition that made milk shoot out of her NOSE is cured
Georgie Yorke, eight months, from Consett, County Durham, was born with birth defect oesophageal atresia, meaning her feeding tube was not connected to her stomach. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Baby Everly blossoms after esophageal atresia surgery
Baby Everly, born weighing a fragile 4 pounds 2 ounces, was diagnosed with the rare birth defect called long gap esophageal atresia (EA)—a condition where part of her esophagus, the tube connecting her mouth to her stomach, was missing. In need of specialized pediatric care for their daughter, Everly’s parents brought her to Boston Children’s Hospital where Russell “Rusty” Jennings, MD, co-director of the hospital’s Esophageal Advanced Treatment Center, and a team of clinicians successfully repaired her esophagus. Today, baby Everly is hitting all of her milestones—eating solid foo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 16, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our patients’ stories Source Type: news

Young mother Rachel Gage vows to give daughter her liver after rare disease
Rachel Gage, 25, from Darlington, has promised to do whatever it takes to save her 11-week-old baby after she was diagnosed with the rare liver disease biliary atresia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Boosting My Son's Immune System Is the Most Important Thing in the World
(Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Poop Color Screening Could Prevent Deaths, Avert Liver Transplants and Lower Treatment Costs in Babies with Rare Liver Disease - 10/27/14
Paying attention to the color of a newborn’s poop can mean the difference between life and death for babies with the rare liver disorder biliary atresia — the leading cause of liver transplants in children. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - October 27, 2014 Category: Research Source Type: news