Medications That Can Cause Depression
There is nothing more frustrating than when the cure is part of the problem. Because depression is prevalent in patients with physical disorders like cancer, stroke, and heart disease, medications often interact with each other, complicating treatment. To appropriately manage depression, you and your physician need to evaluate all medications involved and make sure they aren’t cancelling each other out. A review in the journal Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience a while back highlighted certain medications that can cause depression. The following are medications to watch out for. Medications to Treat Seizures and Park...
Source: World of Psychology - March 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Medications Drug Interactions Mood Disorder Source Type: blogs

The 4 Physiologic Etiologies of Shock, and the 3 Etiologies of Cardiogenic Shock
A 60-something presented with hypotension, bradycardia, chest pain and back pain.She had a h/o aortic aneurysm, aortic insufficiency, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension.  She had a mechanical aortic valve.  She was on anti-hypertensives including atenolol, and on coumadin, with an INR of 2.3. She was ill appearing.  BP was 70/49, pulse 60.A bedside echo showed good ejection fraction and normal right ventricle and no pericardial fluid. Here is the initial ECG:What do you think?This ECG actually looks like a left main occlusion (which rarely presents to the ED alive):  ST Elevation in...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - November 30, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Arrhythmia? Ischemia? Both? Electricity, drugs, lytics, cath lab? You decide.
Written by Pendell Meyers with edits by Steve SmithA male in his 60s presented with off and on shortness of breath and chest pressure over the past few days. He was hypertensive and tachycardic, with mildly increased work of breathing. Here is his initial ECG:What do you think? What will you do for this patient? How many problems does he have?When the team saw this ECG, we obviously noticed the large STE in the inferior leads, with STD in V1-V5, I, and aVL, and STE in V6. However we also noticed that the rhythm is rapid, regular, and narrow, with no P-waves, at a rate of approximately 200 bpm, and therefore not sinus ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - November 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Live the Wheat Belly lifestyle, get off prescription medications
Take a look at the list of medications people have been able to stop by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle. These represent medications prescribed by doctors to, in effect, “treat” the consequences of consuming wheat and grains. They prescribe drugs to treat inflammation, swelling, skin rashes, gastrointestinal irritation, high blood sugars, airway allergy, joint pain, high blood pressure, leg edema and other abnormal effects caused by wheat and grains. The list includes anti-inflammatory and pain medication, acid reflux drugs, injectable and oral drugs for diabetes, numerous anti-hypertensive agents, asthma i...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 27, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune blood sugar bowel flora cholesterol Gliadin gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Addiction Abuse
Hardly a day goes by without a report in the press about some new addiction. There are warnings about addiction to  coffee. Popular psychology publications talk of “extreme sports addiction. ” Some news reports even alert us to the perils of chocolate addiction. One gets the impression that life is awash in threats of addiction. People tend to equate the word “addiction” with “abuse.” Ironically, “addiction” is a subject of abuse.The American Society of Addiction Medicine  defines addiction as a “chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memo...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 13, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Depression: Common medication side effect?
This study is especially thought-provoking, given that more and more people are taking medications with depression or suicidal thoughts as possible side effects. The CDC just released updated data showing a troubling recent rise in suicide rates, and that 54% of those who die from suicide do not have a known mental health disorder, so this is an important public health issue. That said, it is important to note: in this study, people who used these medications were more likely to be widowed and have chronic health problems, both of which are associated with a higher risk of depression. And many (but not all) of these medica...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Anxiety and Depression Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs

Might Depression Be Linked to One of These Popular Medications?
If you’re taking beta blockers, certain kinds of anxiety drugs, certain types of painkillers (including ibuprofen), proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (used to treat acid reflux), ACE inhibitors (used to treat high blood pressure), or anti-convulsant drugs, you may be at greater risk for depression. That’s according to a new, large-scale study published earlier this week in JAMA. However, this was a correlational study, so it can’t say that these medications actually cause depression or not. It may be that people with greater health problems are more likely to take one of these medications and be depressed abo...
Source: World of Psychology - June 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression General Medications Psychiatry Research Drugs cause depression popular medications Source Type: blogs

Zero tolerance for low blood pressure
Just as we have zero tolerance for hypoglycemia in the Wheat Belly lifestyle, we also have zero tolerance for hypotension, or low blood pressure (BP). Follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle free of ciabattas, penne pasta, and tortellini, and blood sugars plummet. If you are injecting insulin or taking other diabetes drugs, hypoglycemia is a risk and can be dangerous, resulting in loss of consciousness and injury. We therefore urge everyone to talk to their doctor about discontinuing or reducing insulin and diabetes drugs immediately upon starting the Wheat Belly lifestyle. Unfortunately, the majority of doctors don’t under...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 8, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood pressure blood sugar BP gluten-free grain-free grains health hypertension hypertensive Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 38-year-old woman with a HbA1c value of 9.1%
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 38-year-old woman is evaluated after laboratory study results show an HbA1c value of 9.1%. Her HbA1c goal is less than 7% because she has high function, long life expectancy, few comorbidities, good support, health literacy, and access to care. Medical history is significant for morbid obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Family history is notable for her mother, sister, and brother with type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Medications are insulin g...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 2, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Diabetes Endocrinology Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Atrial fibrillation with RVR: use POCUS to assess volume; then sinus vs. SVT: use of Lewis leads
An elderly man with a history of diabetes and HTN presented with lethargy and weakness, decreased urine output, and hypotension. There was no history of any GI bleeding or other hemorrhage. There was no fever. He had no CP or SOB, and it was unknown if there was a previous history of atrial fib. He was on atenolol, but it was not known if this was simply for hypertension, or for atrial fib.He was not anti coagulated.Blood pressures ranged from 83/45 to 125/83, lower than usual. HR ranged from 110 to 145.He had an ECG recorded upon arrival:There is atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular respon...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - August 9, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

The need for pharmacy electives in the medical school curriculum
I spent one year working full-time as a pharmacy technician at a high-volume community pharmacy prior to entering medical school. Besides learning the intricacies of billing and the dispensing process, I was granted personal access into a world nearly all patients, but few providers are aware of.  At the time my job was just that: a job. There were fun perks like counting pills in multiples of five and visualizing the different colors and sizes of capsules and tablets I had never come across before. But it wasn’t until medical school that I began to fully appreciate my pharmacy knowledge. Our school has a free s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 21, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sarayna-schock" rel="tag" > Sarayna Schock < /a > Tags: Meds Medical school Medications Source Type: blogs

Are these prescription drugs preventing your weight loss?
A number of drugs prescribed to treat common conditions, such as hypertension, allergies, depression, inflammation, and diabetes, block your ability to lose weight. Several of these drugs actually cause weight gain, and most doctors fail to inform their patients of such side effects. Among the drugs that block weight loss are: Beta-blockers: metoprolol, atenolol, carvedilol, and propranolol  Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), doxepin, paroxetine (Paxil), trazodone, and others Steroids: prednisone and hydrocortisone (but not inhaled or nasal steroids for allergies) Antihistamines: diphen...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - September 13, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Depression Dr. Davis Drugs and wheat Nutritional supplements Weight loss Wheat Belly Wheat Belly Lifestyle Wheat Belly Total Health Wheat-Free Lifestyle anxiety Source Type: blogs

DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance New Test Series 5
Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 30 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Information This new test series requires ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - August 6, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Featured Source Type: blogs

DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Mock Test 23
Please wait while the activity loads. If this activity does not load, try refreshing your browser. Also, this page requires javascript. Please visit using a browser with javascript enabled. If loading fails, click here to try again Click on the 'Start' button to begin the mock test. After answering all questions, click on the 'Get Results' button to display your score and the explanations. There is no time limit for this mock test. Start Congratulations - you have completed DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Mock Test 23. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rat...
Source: Cardiophile MD - March 25, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Featured Source Type: blogs

Atrial Fib with RVR. What treatment? Then SVT. Is it sinus? Use ultrasound and Lewis leads!
An elderly man with a history of diabetes and HTN presented with lethargy and weakness.  He had no CP or SOB, and it was unknown if there was a previous history of atrial fib.  He was on atenolol, but it was not known if this was simply for hypertension, or for atrial fib.  He was not anticoagulated.  He also had decreased urine output.  There was no history of any GI bleeding or other hemorrhage.  There was no fever.  He had an ECG recorded upon arrival:There is atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response (rate of approximately 120).  There are aberrantly conducted beats (...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 25, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Mock Test 6
Please wait while the activity loads. If this activity does not load, try refreshing your browser. Also, this page requires javascript. Please visit using a browser with javascript enabled. If loading fails, click here to try again Click on the 'Start' button to begin the mock test. After answering all questions, click on the 'Get Results' button to display your score and the explanations. There is no time limit for this mock test. Start Congratulations - you have completed DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Mock Test 6. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rate...
Source: Cardiophile MD - January 22, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

What medications have you been able to stop on the Wheat Belly lifestyle?
I posed this question on the Wheat Belly Facebook page recently and received an overwhelming response. Here, I share a partial list of the responses: medications people have been able to stop by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle. Just take a look at this incredible list: these represent medications prescribed by doctors to, in effect, “treat” the consequences of consuming wheat and grains. They prescribe drugs to treat the inflammation, swelling, skin rashes, gastrointestinal irritation, high blood sugars, airway allergy, and other abnormal effects all caused by wheat and grains. The list includes anti-infl...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 6, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle asthma cholesterol diabetes drugs gluten grains hypertension prescription medication reflux Source Type: blogs

Blow your HDL through the roof
The HDL cholesterol value is one of the four values on any conventional lipid/cholesterol panel, along with total cholesterol, triglycerides, and calculated LDL cholesterol (what I call “fictitious” LDL because of its incredible inaccuracy when compared to superior measures). The HDL cholesterol value has some unique characteristics not shared by the others, however, and can serve as an index of overall health. Very high HDL values, for instance, are associated with extreme longevity. Centenarians typically have values of 90 mg/dl or higher. Higher HDLs are also associated with less risk for diabetes, hypertens...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 29, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle fish oil HDL longevity omega-3 saturated fat vitamin D Source Type: blogs

Beta blockers in heart failure – Cardiology MCQ
Beta blockers shown to be useful in heart failure include all except: a) Carvedilol b) Metoprolol c) Bisoprolol d) Atenolol Correct answer: d) Atenolol Atenolol is a hydrophilic beta blocker while the rest are lipophilic. Trials showing efficacy in heart failure: Carvedilol: COMET Trial [1] Metoprolol: MERIT-HF Trial [2] Bisoprolol: CIBIS Trial [3] References Poole-Wilson PA, Swedberg K, Cleland JG, Di Lenarda A, Hanrath P, Komajda M, Lubsen J, Lutiger B, Metra M, Remme WJ, Torp-Pedersen C, Scherhag A, Skene A; Carvedilol Or Metoprolol European Trial Investigators. Comparison of carvedilol and metoprolol on...
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 8, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

I lost the wheat, but didn’t lose the weight: Updated version
Yes, it happens: Rid your life of all things wheat and you get relief from acid reflux, joint pain, and high blood sugars . . . but not weight loss. While most people enjoy rapid and dramatic weight loss with wheat elimination due to the loss of the appetite-stimulating effect of gliadin-derived opiates, the loss of repetitive glucose-insulin provocation of amylopectin A, the reduction of inflammation from the combined effects of gliadin/wheat germ agglutinin/amylopectin A, and reversal of the leptin-blocking effect of wheat germ agglutinin, this doesn’t happen to everybody. Or you lose, say, 20 pounds, only to have...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 7, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle carbohydrates gluten grains insulin low-carb Thyroid Weight Loss whey Source Type: blogs

Drugs that block weight loss
Following the Wheat Belly lifestyle of wheat and grain elimination results in weight loss in the majority of people in short order. But there are exceptions. The exceptions should not be interpreted to mean that this lifestyle does not work; it should initiate a search for why the weight loss effect of wheat and grain elimination is being blocked. Iodine deficiency, for example, is a common cause for failed weight loss, no matter how perfect your diet and how much you exercise. Another common cause for failed weight loss are prescription drugs and a few over-the-counter drugs. Among the common drugs that will block your ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 15, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten grains prescription drugs Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

A Relatively Narrow Complex Tachycardia at a Rate of 180.
I received a text message with this image: "Cardioversion didn't work.  Any thoughts?" What do you think?  The heart rate is 180.I was viewing this on my phone, but I saw what I thought were P-waves.  I could barely see them in lead II:There are probable P-waves at the arrows, but I wasn't certainI texted back: "Could be very fast sinus."There is also a wide QRS at 113 ms and a large R-wave in aVR, so sodium channel blockade is likely.   Common culprits in this situation are tricyclic overdose and cocaine toxicity (remember cocaine not only increases dopamine in central syn...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - February 8, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Medications After a Heart Attack
From: www.secondscount.orgYour heart attack recovery will include medications. Taking these medications exactly as prescribed is one of the best tools at your disposal for avoiding death in the months following a heart attack. According to an article published in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association, heart attack patients who had not filled any of their prescriptions within 120 days of being discharged from the hospital had 80 percent greater odds of death than those who filled all of their prescriptions.Medications you are likely to be prescribed after a heart attack fall int...
Source: Dr Portnay - January 23, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr Portnay Source Type: blogs

Losartan No Better Than Atenolol in Marfan’s Syndrome
Beta-blockers have been the standard treatment for people with Marfan’s syndrome, a rare inherited connective tissue disorder that affects about 1 in 5000 people. The goal of treatment is to prevent or slow down the dilation of the aorta and avoid aortic dissection, the main cause of death. In recent years, studies have raised the hope that losartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, might be more effective than beta-blockers in slowing aortic enlargement. The Pediatric Heart Network Investigators randomized 608 children and young adults with Marfan’s syndrome to the beta-blocker atenolol or losartan…. &h...
Source: CardioBrief - November 19, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Larry Husten Tags: Prevention, Epidemiology & Outcomes atenolol losartan Marfan Source Type: blogs

CoQ10: Powerful Supplement for Health
Discussion of the Evidence, Scope, Benefits and Risk. Please take a look at this discussion as I’m certain it will help answer some important questions. In addition, some very informative research about coenzyme Q10 can be found in the science section of our website. Coenzyme Q10 is one of the most fundamentally important nutritional supplements I recommend and use in my clinical practice not just for patients with heart disease, but to support brain health and general health as well. We generally recommend 100mg daily, and 200mg daily for those on statins, beta-blockers, or tricyclic antidepressants. The post CoQ10:...
Source: Renegade Neurologist - A Blog by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN - August 19, 2014 Category: Neurologists Authors: gbadmin Tags: Science Supplements beta-blockers blood pressure Cardiovascular disease Cholesterol CoQ10 heart lipitor migraines Statins toprol zocor Source Type: blogs

Failing to Extend Life Via Altered Levels of Membrane Fatty Acid Unsaturation
The membrane pacemaker hypothesis suggests that composition of cell membranes, especially those of mitochondria, is an important determinant of longevity differences between species - and possibly between individuals within a species as well. One specific proposed mechanism is the degree to which membranes contain unsaturated fatty acids, as these are more vulnerable to oxidative damage. Oxidative damage is connected to aging, but its role is subtle and complex: look back in the archives for an outline of the mitochondrial free radical theory of aging, for example, in which oxidative damage inside cells is only the initiat...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 17, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Heart rate 50/minute at rest, on medications for high BP – Any need to worry?
Medications belonging to the group of beta blockers (e.g. atenolol, metoprolol) and some medications belonging to the group of calcium channel blockers (e.g. diltiazem, verapamil), can reduce resting heart rate. A resting heart of 50/minute alone is not a reason for worry. If you have symptoms like light headedness, greying of vision or fainting of episodes, your doctor may want to reduce the dose of these medications or substitute another for control of your blood pressure. Normal heart rate for an adult is in the range of 60-100/minute. It can go down in sleep and go up with exercise and stress. (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 16, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Medical Mispronunciations and Misspelled Words: The Definitive List.
Hearing medical mispronunciations and seeing misspelled words are an under appreciated  joy of working in healthcare.  Physicians often forget just how alien the language of medicine is to people who don't live it everyday.  The best part about being a physician is not helping people recover from critical illness. The best part is not  about  listening and understanding with compassion and empathy.  Nope, the best part about being a physician is hearing patients and other healthcare providers butcher the language of medicine and experiencing great entertainment in the process.   Doctors c...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - October 2, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Tamer Mahrous Source Type: blogs

Beta blocker with additional vasodilatory effect
: a) Atenolol b) Metoprolol c) Carvedilol d) None of the above Correct answer: c) Carvedilol Carvedilol has additional vasodilatory effect and hence one of the best beta blockers found to be useful in heart failure. In stable heart failure, beta blockers have been shown to improve long term survival. But beta blockers should not be started in decompensated heart failure. They should be started only after initial stabilization, that too in small doses which are gradually titrated upwards. (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - September 2, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Cardiology MCQ Online 3
Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 25 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 You are welcome to try this MCQ set and share it among your friends. Answer key with explanation appears after you complete the test and submit it and press on the view questions button. We strongly advi...
Source: Cardiophile MD - July 14, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Cardiology MCQ Test 3
Cardiology MCQ Online 3 Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 25 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 You are welcome to try this MCQ set and share it among your friends. Answer key with explanation appears after you complete the test and submit it and press on the view questions b...
Source: Cardiophile MD - July 14, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Cardiology Online Test Series 2
Cardiology Online Test Series 2 Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 30 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 You are welcome to try this Cardiology MCQ set and share it among your friends. We strongly advise you to verify the answe...
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 22, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Cardiology Online Test Series 2
Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 30 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 You are welcome to try this Cardiology MCQ set and share it among your friends. We strongly advise you to verify the answers with standard text books. ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 21, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Electronic Health Record Safety
On December 21, 2012, ONC issued its Health IT Patient Safety Action & Surveillance Plan for public commentI was interviewed by the Boston Globe about the plan.Although EHRs address a variety of safety concerns such as unreadable orders/prescriptions, drug/drug interaction checking, and fostering care coordination, they can create new problems that did not exist with paper.   These problems are rare (less than 1% of quality issues reported), but they are important.For example, a clinician writing a paper prescription for Atenolol, a beta blocker used for cardiovascular diseases, would be  unlikely to accident...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - January 7, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Source Type: blogs

Precordial ST depression. What is the diagnosis?
A middle aged male with no h/o CAD presented with one week of crescendo exertional angina, and had chest pain at the time of the first ECG:Here is the patient's previous ECG:NormalHere is the patient's presenting ED ECG:What do you think?There is isolated ST depression in precordial leads, deeper in V2 - V4 than in V5 or V6.  There is no ST elevation.  Precordial ST depression may be subendocardial ischemia or posterior STEMI.  How can we tell the difference?  See the list below.If you thought it might be a posterior STEMI, then you might have ordered a posterior ECG [change leads V4...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 1, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs