Baby born with webbed fingers and toes will have life-changing surgery
Amaya John, five months, from Barry in Wales, has Apert syndrome. This has also left her with a protruding forehead and cleft lip. The five-month-old has to breathe via a machine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parents shocked when daughter is born with protruding forehead and webbed fingers and toes
Sarah Ewing, six, from Indiana, was diagnosed at birth with Apert syndrome, a disorder that causes the bones to fuse together. She's already had seven surgeries but doctors say she could need up to 60. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moment a 19-month-old girl with Apert syndrome sits up by herself
Gracie Heater, who has been an inpatient at Seattle Children's Hospital for 18 months, has Apert syndrome - a genetic disorder that causes a fusion of bones in the skull and spine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heartwarming footage captures the moment a 19-month-old girl sits up by herself
Gracie Heater, who has been an inpatient at Seattle Children's Hospital for 18 months, has Apert syndrome - a genetic disorder that causes a fusion of bones in the skull and spine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

His Tooth is Funny Looking. What is It?
Discussion Teeth are specialized anatomic parts of the human body that are developed between the ectoderm and ecomesenchyme in a complex process called odontogenesis. More than 300 genes have been identified that influence odontogenesis. Dental abnormalities can have significance for cosmesis, malocclusion, dental caries and periodontal diseases. It is not uncommon for more than 1 area to be affected. For example, Hutchinson teeth which are caused by congenital syphilis are smaller with wider spacing between the teeth within the arch, and also have a characteristic notching. Learning Point Some common dental problems that...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 14, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is Apert syndrome?
Learn about Apert syndrome, a genetic condition that causes abnormal head, hand, and foot development. We look at symptoms, treatment, and outlook. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Parents of a boy with fused fingers sell their belongings
Aswanth, eight, from Palakurthi in the southern Indian state of Telangana, suffers from Apert syndrome, which makes the head grow abnormally large and is associated with intellectual disability. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Day to Remember That Every Child Deserves a Chance
Emina Cerimovic is a disability rights researcher at Human Rights Watch.By Emina ĆerimovićNEW YORK, Feb 27 2017 (IPS)The day I met Julija she was playing cheerfully with her baby sister on the floor inside their room in Kragujevac, a small town in southern Serbia. When she saw me – a stranger — on the doorstep, she smiled widely and stretched out her hands, offering a hug. As I held her, I could hear how difficult it was for her to breathe. I looked at her, she smiled and touched my face with her hands and only then did I see that Julija’s fingers were webbed.Julija was born with Apert Sy...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Emina Cerimovic Tags: Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Serbia Source Type: news

Families with Apert syndrome find similarities, not differences
Madilynn and her father Rocky For some families in the waiting room on the day of the Apert syndrome clinic, it’s a reunion. For others, it’s a revelation. Coming to Boston Children’s Hospital from as far away as China, some have never met another child with Apert syndrome. Before long, parents and kids of all ages and ethnicities are taking group selfies as the younger children run around and play. “These kids have the brightest smiles, they’re very resilient,” says Tambra Milot, mother of 3-year-old Madilynn. Each year, the clinic sees about 50 children with Apert syndrome, a rare genetic disorder in which th...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Our Patients’ Stories apert syndrome Cleft and Craniofacial Center craniosynostosis Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery Dr. Amir Taghinia Dr. Brian Labow Dr. John Meara Dr. Mark Proctor Dr. Richard Bruun sleep apnea Source Type: news

The testicle timebomb warning: Older fathers 'are more likely to have mutant sperm...and children with genetic diseases'
As a man ages, the risk of conditions such as Apert syndrome, which affects skull and limb development, and dwarfism increases, Oxford University researchers found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Life Is Like With A Disfigured Face
(Photo: © Anthony Gerace) In a world obsessed with beauty, living with a facial disfigurement can be hard. Neil Steinberg explores the past and present to find out what it’s like to look different.“Take your ear off for me, please,” Rosie Seelaus says to Randy James, who is sitting on a black exam chair in a special room designed for viewing colors in the Craniofacial Center on the Near West Side of Chicago.He reaches up and detaches his right ear, which she created for him out of silicone seven years before. The ear is shabby, stained from skin oil and mottled by daily use. Viewed under various lights in the neu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

He had a frame drilled into his head and his skull cracked open: Now, after more than 50 operations, brave Billy has a new face after battling rare illness
Seven-year-old Billy Mitchell, from Hertfordshire, was born with Apert syndrome, a rare condition that causes malformations of the skull, face, hands and feet. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trading my patient ID bracelet for an employee ID badge
Honoring Craniofacial Acceptance Month and one young man’s quest to give back By Torrence Chrisman Torrence Chrisman, 24, is a history major at the University of Massachusetts Boston. At birth, Torrence was diagnosed with Apert syndrome, a rare genetic birth disorder involving abnormal growth of the skull and the face, fingers and toes. Read about his medical journey as a Boston Children’s patient and his quest to return to the hospital. I came to Boston after being born in Chicago, where I was diagnosed with the amazing Apert syndrome. It was because of the doctors and surgeons at Boston Children’s Hospital that I e...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 29, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: All posts apert syndrome birth disorder craniofacial plastic and oral surgery department plastic surgery Source Type: news

Kira Yates, 9, has 'broken doll syndrome' and is held together with metal bar
Kira Yates, from Doncaster, has Apert syndrome - a condition involving abnormal growth of the skull and face and various other abnormalities. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shedding light on Apert syndrome development with the help of 3-D imaging
Three dimensional imaging of two different mouse models of Apert Syndrome shows that cranial deformation begins before birth and continues, worsening with time, according to a team of researchers who studied mice to better understand and treat the disorder in humans.Apert Syndrome is caused by mutations in FGFR2 - fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 - a gene, which usually produces a protein that functions in cell division, regulation of cell growth and maturation, formation of blood vessels, wound healing, and embryonic development. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 4, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bones / Orthopedics Source Type: news