Hepatitis C Viral Load Fluctuates Without TreatmentHepatitis C Viral Load Fluctuates Without Treatment
Changes in circulating hepatitis C RNA that occur in patients with untreated virus could influence the best time to prescribe antiviral therapy, researchers say. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

HCV Clearance Key to Liver Fibrosis RegressionHCV Clearance Key to Liver Fibrosis Regression
In patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), sustained clearance of HCV-RNA after antiviral therapy is the major determinant of liver fibrosis regression, researchers say. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Bee Venom Destroys HIV And Spares Surrounding Cells
Nanoparticles containing bee venom toxin melittin can destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) while at the same time leaving surrounding cells unharmed, scientists from Washington University School of Medicine reported in the March 2013 issue of Antiviral Therapy. The researchers said that their finding is a major step toward creating a vaginal gel that can prevent HIV spread. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. Joshua L... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: HIV / AIDS Source Type: news

FDA approves new Roche test to evaluate response to hepatitis C therapy
Viral load test uses a novel dual-probe approach designed to manage patients being treated with antiviral therapies. Roche announced today that it has received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a next-generation viral load test to be used in the management of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV Test, v2.0 provides a novel dual-probe approach, for an extra layer of protection in detecting and quantifying the virus. The test is designed to accurately determine the amount of hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid (RNA) in order to assess a patient...
Source: Roche Investor Update - March 6, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

US doctors cure child born with HIV
Mississippi doctors make medical history made with first 'functional cure' of unnamed two-year-old born with the virus who now needs no medication• Research provides hope of a 'functional cure' for AIDSDoctors in the US have made medical history by effectively curing a child born with HIV, the first time such a case has been documented.The infant, who is now two and a half, needs no medication for HIV, has a normal life expectancy and is highly unlikely to be infectious to others, doctors believe.Though medical staff and scientists are unclear why the treatment was effective, the surprise success has raised hopes that th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 4, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: The Guardian United States Children World news Health Medical research Society Aids and HIV Science Source Type: news

UPDATE: After liver transplant for HCV, better antiviral results with cyclosporine
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In patients transplanted for hepatitis C cirrhosis, the virus inevitably recurs. Now a new meta-analysis suggests that cyclosporine-based immunosuppression may be associated with a better response to antiviral therapy after transplant than tacrolimus-based protocols. (Source: Modern Medicine)
Source: Modern Medicine - January 2, 2013 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

After liver transplant for HCV, better antiviral results with cyclosporine
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In patients transplanted for hepatitis C cirrhosis, the virus inevitably recurs. Now a new meta-analysis suggests that cyclosporine-based immunosuppression may be associated with a better response to antiviral therapy after transplant than tacrolimus-based protocols. (Source: Modern Medicine)
Source: Modern Medicine - January 2, 2013 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news