Corporate Fear Drives Caribbean Vaccine COVID-19 Mandates
The private sector and some government agencies have demanded that staff vaccinate, especially in the tourism industry that drives many regional economies. Credit: Zadie Neufville/IPSBy Zadie NeufvilleKINGSTON, Nov 22 2021 (IPS) When face-to-face Cabinet meetings resumed in Jamaica following more than a year of virtual meetings due to COVID-19, Ministers lined up to have their immunisation cards inspected. Prime Minister Andrew Holness said the Government “has to lead the country towards normality”. “The way to do it is for every Jamaican to comply with the infection, prevention and control measures that have been ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Zadie Neufville Tags: COVID-19 COVID-19 VACCINES Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Financial Crisis Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Source Type: news

At COP26, China and the U.S. Pledge to Increase Cooperation on Climate Action
China and the United States have pledged to increase cooperation on climate action at U.N. talks in Glasgow, China’s climate envoy said Wednesday. As the talks approached a Friday deadline, Xie Zhenhua told reporters that the two biggest carbon polluters would outline their efforts in a joint statement based on the guidelines of the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change. The agreement calls for “concrete and pragmatic’’ regulations in decarbonization, reducing methane emissions and fighting deforestation, Xie said. “Both sides recognize that there is a gap between the current effort and the P...
Source: TIME: Science - November 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein, Aniruddha Ghosal and Frank Jordans / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change wire Source Type: news

‘It’s Tough to Get Out’: How Caribbean Medical Schools Fail Their Students
The institutions are expensive, often operated for profit and eager to accept applicants. But graduates have trouble landing residencies and jobs. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emma Goldberg Tags: Admissions Standards For-Profit Schools Education Medical Schools Colleges and Universities Accreditation Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) your-feed-science your-feed-health Caribbean Area Antigua and Barbuda Dominica Grenada Source Type: news

St Vincent volcano: heavy ashfall clouds evacuation efforts on Caribbean island
Antigua and Guyana ready to take evacuees or ship supplies after Friday explosion sent plume more than 33,000ft (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pandemic Accentuates Need for Caribbean Countries to Improve Food and Nutrition Security
Jaxine Scott displays some vegetables in her backyard garden at her Kingston, Jamaica home. Credit: Kate ChappellBy Kate ChappellKINGSTON, Jamaica, Apr 2 2021 (IPS) Last year, Jaxine Scott was off work as a caregiver at a primary school as a result of the pandemic. One day, she noticed a green shoot emerging from some garlic in her fridge. She decided to plant it, and to her surprise, it thrived. “I thought ‘It looks like I have a green thumb, let me plant something else,’” Scott says. She now has a backyard garden, including cucumber, pumpkin, melon, callaloo, cantaloupe, pak choy and tomatoes. “It makes me feel...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kate Chappell Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Five Years since the Paris Agreement: The Race to Net Zero Is On
GGGI has been working closely with the Provincial Government of Central Kalimantan supporting effective policymaking and planning to drive reduced deforestation and peatland degradation in the province, particularly in Utar Serapat which consists of 107,000 ha of peatlands. GGGI also supports Central Kalimantan in mobilizing public and private investment for sustainable and inclusive landscape-based projects designed to achieve low carbon development in the province. By Frank Rijsberman, Ingvild Solvang, Kristin Deason, Julie Godin, Hanh Le, Siddhartha Nauduri, and Marcel Silvius, Global Green Growth InstituteDec 17 2020 (...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Frank Rijsberman -Ingvild Solvang - Kristin Deason Tags: Climate Change Environment Green Economy Health Humanitarian Emergencies Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) 2020 Source Type: news

Sir Prince Ramsey, Guttmacher Institute and Save a Child ’s Heart recognized with UN Population Award
UNITED NATIONS, New York – The United Nations honoured Dr. Sir Prince Ramsey, an Antiguan family doctor who played a pivotal role in advocating for HIV patients at the height of the AIDS crisis in the 1980s, and who pioneered HIV services for pregnant women in the region. In recognition of these and other achievements, Dr. Ramsey received the 2018 UN Population Award at a ceremony held today at UN Headquarters in New York.   (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

Archaeologists say early Caribbeans were not 'savage cannibals', as colonists wrote
Researchers in Antigua hope to correct ‘speculative and erroneous’ colonial accounts that depict the Carib people as ferocious man-eatersFor centuries, historians held that the Caribbean ’s earliest inhabitants were peaceful farmers who were wiped out by the ferocious man-eating Carib people. But archaeologists in Antigua say new evidence from one of the most important sites in the region is helping to correct “speculative and erroneous” accounts passed down from early colonis ts.The excavation at a 12-acre site in Indian Creek has prompted a reassessment of older narratives, said Dr Reg Murphy, who is leading a ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gemma Handy in English Harbour Tags: Antigua & Barbuda Caribbean Archaeology World news Americas Science History Indigenous peoples Source Type: news

Archeologists say early Caribbeans were not 'savage cannibals', as colonists wrote
Researchers in Antigua hope to correct ‘speculative and erroneous’ colonial accounts that depict the Carib people as ferocious man-eatersFor centuries, historians held that the Caribbean ’s earliest inhabitants were peaceful farmers who were wiped out by the ferocious man-eating Carib people. But archaeologists in Antigua say new evidence from one of the most important sites in the region is helping to correct “speculative and erroneous” accounts passed down from early colonis ts.The excavation at a 12-acre site in Indian Creek has prompted a reassessment of older narratives, said Dr Reg Murphy, who is leading a ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gemma Handy in English Harbour Tags: Antigua & Barbuda Caribbean Archaeology World news Americas Science History Indigenous peoples Source Type: news

3 Months After Irma, The State Of Barbuda
In September, Hurricane Irma cut across the Atlantic. Barbuda is among the tiny islands in the Caribbean that suffered some of the worst damage. Freelance journalist Anika Kentish has an update. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Three Months After Irma, The State Of Barbuda
In early September, Hurricane Irma cut a path of destruction across the Atlantic. Barbuda is among the string of tiny islands in the Caribbean that suffered some of the worst damage. Freelance journalist Anika Kentish provides a sense of how Barbuda is doing. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

As Residents Start To Return, Devastated Barbuda Struggles To Rebuild
The Caribbean island of Barbuda had to evacuate all its residents when Hurricane Irma hit last month, but now they are slowly starting to return. NPR's Michel Martin catches up with reporter Anika Kentish who's been following the story. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women stand strong after Irma
Language EnglishST. JOHN ’S, Antigua and Barbuda – A scurry of activity greeted visitors at one of Antigua ’s two largest temporary shelters, National Technical Training Centre, which houses around 70 Barbudans displaced by Hurricane Irma. Shelter manager Samantha Burnette appeared with her phone in hand and a large, welcoming smile. She is one of several dedicated women leading the country’s recover y efforts. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - September 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

How Big Is Hurricane Maria?
Hurricane Maria has devastated the Caribbean island of Dominica, just days after it was brushed by Hurricane Irma. Maria, now a Category 5 storm, is expected to remain very strong as it heads toward Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Haiti. According to the National Hurricane Center, hurricane-force winds extend up to 30 miles from Hurricane Maria’s center, while tropical storm-force winds extend outward for up to 125 miles. How does that compare to other recent or major hurricanes? Irma Hurricane Irma killed at least 33 people in the U.S. and 51 in the Caribbean when it struck last week. At its peak, the diamet...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized Hurricanes onetime weather Source Type: news