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Lactococcus garviae Prosthetic Mitral Valve Endocarditis: a Case Report and Literature Review
We report a new case of L. garviae prosthetic mitral valve endocarditis that was managed with antibiotic therapy alone. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 10, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Ewout Landeloos, Guy Van Camp, Hans De Beenhouwer Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Steering a Transition in Antibiotic Prescribing: Just-in-Time, Not Just-in-Case
Antibiotics are the most common medication prescribed in post-acute and long-term care facilities, and suspected urinary tract infection is the most frequent indication for initiation of antibiotic therapy. However, there has been a growing realization that much of this treatment is unnecessary and potentially harmful. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - July 28, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Peter P. Patterson Tags: Guest Editorial Source Type: news

Procalcitonin-guided decision making for duration of antibiotic therapy in neonates with suspected early-onset sepsis: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial (NeoPIns)
This research article concludes that procalcitonin-guided decision making was superior to standard care in reducing duration of antibiotic therapy in neonates with suspected early-onset sepsis (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antibiotic treatment to prevent post-extraction complications: a monocentric, randomized clinical trial. Preliminary outcomes.
CONCLUSIONS:Post-extractive complications observed in each group have been mild and fast to resolve. The antibiotic administration showed a decrease in pain suffered by patients but a higher incidence of gastro-intestinal side effects, such as abdominal distension and diarrhea, which seemed to be relieved by the concomitant use of the probiotic. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - June 12, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Antibiotics vs Surgery: Equally Effective for Appendicitis? Antibiotics vs Surgery: Equally Effective for Appendicitis?
Dr Lowenfels comments on a study examining whether antibiotic therapy is an effective replacement for standard surgical appendectomy, published in Annals of Surgery.Medscape General Surgery (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: General Surgery Viewpoint Source Type: news

New approach to antibiotic therapy is a dead end for pathogens
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) In the case of the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the evolution of resistance to certain antibiotics leads to an increased susceptibility to other drugs. This concept of so-called 'collateral sensitivity' opens up new perspectives in the fight against multi-resistant pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 1, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis reduces mortality in people with advanced liver disease
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) A multicenter, randomized, controlled study presented today found that long-term oral antibiotic therapy with norfloxacin improved the prognosis of people with life-threatening advanced liver disease. The study, presented at The International Liver Congress ™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, showed that norfloxacin administration for six months was associated with a reduced risk of death and infection at six months in patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis, a very severe and advanced stage of liver disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing by online pharmacies 'reckless'
Conclusion Worryingly, most of the online pharmacies had no evidence of the registration required by current UK and European legislation. This could be because some of the operators were based outside Europe – but regardless of where they are based, they are still subject to UK legislation if selling to the UK public. The study raises concerns about the effectiveness of current UK legislation and the regulation of companies selling antibiotics over the internet. This research does have some limitations, however: Google and Yahoo searches are not identical when different browsers are used ...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock updated
This updated guideline was produced by 55 international experts; with the most important changes and advances in the guideline being in the domains of initial resuscitation and antibiotic therapy. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surviving Sepsis Guidelines: A Continuous Move Toward Better Care of Patients With Sepsis
The updated guideline was generated by 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations involved in the care of patients with sepsis and providing 93 recommendations on early management of sepsis and septic shock. There are numerous major advances in the revision of the guidelines. Among the various topics covered, initial resuscitation and antibiotic therapy are the domains in which the most important changes and advances were made. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is it Harmful to Not Finish Antibiotics?
Is it harmful to not finish antibiotics? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Drew Smith, former R&D director at MicroPhage and SomaLogic, on Quora: Doctors are taught that it is important to finish out a course of antibiotics, and they dutifully relay this information to their patients. But the determination of therapy duration is usually based on almost no evidence at all. This is especially true for our understanding of the risk of the development of resistance, which is rarely a measured outcome in the clini...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers find gene mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotics
Amy WallaceMEMPHIS, Jan. 3 (UPI) -- Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital uncovered a gene mutation that allows bacteria to tolerate normally effective antibiotic therapy. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antibiotic resistance just became more complex
Bacteria that are susceptible to antibiotics can survive when enough resistant cells around them are expressing an antibiotic-deactivating factor. This new take on how the microbial context can compromise antibiotic therapy was just published by a team of microbiologists. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Antibiotic resistance just became more complex
(University of Groningen) Bacteria that are susceptible to antibiotics can survive when enough resistant cells around them are expressing an antibiotic-deactivating factor. This new take on how the microbial context can compromise antibiotic therapy was published by a team of microbiologists from the University of Groningen microbiologists, together with colleagues from San Diego, in the journal PLOS Biology on Dec. 27. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 27, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Recommendations On How Long Ear Infections Should Be Treated
BOSTON (CBS) – Ear infections are incredibly common among young kids and many get them multiple times a year, but for how long do they need to be treated? In children under 2, ear infections are usually treated with oral antibiotics for 10 days. But antibiotics can cause an upset stomach and rashes and there’s always the concern for antibiotic resistance, so doctors wanted to see if kids would do just as well with 5 days of treatment instead of 10. The answer is probably “no”. In a recent study they found that children less than 2 years of age treated with only 5 days of antibiotic therapy were more...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Ear Infections Source Type: news

Stingray Injuries
Dr. Nabil Ebraheim would like to thank his employee Cherie Martzke, for her contribution to this article. Most stingrays have one or more barbed stings on the tail, which are used in self-defense. They will not attack humans but they will defend themselves when threatened, especially when stepped on (Figure 1). Stingrays cause around 1,500 injuries per year and are caused by puncture from their strong serrated, boney spines or barbs. The tail contains a sheath that will discharge venom once it is ruptured (Figure 2). If you are stung by a stingray, clean the injury with soap and water. Make sure the spine is co...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Steroid use linked to worse outcomes in Lyme disease-associated facial paralysis
Researchers have found that patients who were prescribed corticosteroids as part of treatment for Lyme disease-associated facial paralysis had worse long-term outcomes of regaining facial function than those who were prescribed antibiotic therapy alone. Based on these findings the researchers urge caution in prescribing corticosteroids to patients with acute Lyme disease-associated facial paralysis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Steroid use linked to worse outcomes in Lyme disease-associated facial paralysis
(Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary) Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have found that patients who were prescribed corticosteroids as part of treatment for Lyme disease-associated facial paralysis had worse long-term outcomes of regaining facial function than those who were prescribed antibiotic therapy alone. Based on these findings, which were published online today in Laryngoscope, the researchers urge caution in prescribing corticosteroids to patients with acute Lyme disease-associated facial paralysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 6, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Tipping Point: Patients predisposed to Clostridium difficile infection and a hospital antibiotic stewardship programme
This paper concludes that analytic models can prospectively identify most patients at the time of admission who later test positive for C. difficile. This approach to early identification may help AMS programmes pursue susceptibility testing and modifications to antibiotic therapies sooner in order to better prevent C. Difficile Infections (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sepsis Care and Treatment in New Zealand and Australia
Sepsis is internationally recognized as a medical emergency.1 As a result, clinicians' attitudes toward its treatment has evolved over the last 10 years, and treatment regimes in both ambulance services and hospitals have become more aggressive. The key research finding that underpins these changes is that early antimicrobial therapy is essential in reducing mortality.2,3 The therapy also reduces in-hospital complications and shortens patient recovery times. The most commonly adopted treatment for sepsis comprises administration of IV fluid alongside antimicrobial therapy.2,3 Evidence and support for the more aggressive tr...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Benjamin Wylie-Cheer, BHlthSc (Paramedic), PgCEM Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Antibiotic Therapy During Infancy Increases Type 1 Diabetes Risk in Mice
Three therapeutic doses administered during early life disturb the animals’ microbiomes and lead to enduring changes in the immune systems of non-obese diabetic mice, researchers report. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 22, 2016 Category: Science Tags: Daily News, News & Opinion Source Type: news

Yale-Trained Doctor Refutes Dangerous Misinformation Given by CDC's Dr. Paul Mead on Fox 5 Lyme Special
This study evaluated antibiotic vs placebo. The study was terminated early due to the determined likelihood that a beneficial effect would not be found. When this was critically analyzed with biostatistical methods, an article was published which I believe demonstrates that Klempner's study was so poorly designed and analyzed that in order for a treatment effect to have been observed, the antibiotic treated patients would have had to improve to a level of health which was a full standard deviation better than the average health of the general population. It's a reasonable hope for antibiotics to return a patient to a somew...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 16, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Laboratory Blood Cultures: Past, Present, and Future
The expedient recovery of microorganisms from blood is an important subject both for the clinical microbiology laboratory and for the care of the patient. Blood culture techniques continue to be the subject of research and development, in part because the early identification of a potential microbial pathogen and because the subsequent antibiotic susceptibility results influence patient outcomes and guide targeted antimicrobial therapy. These functions are of even greater importance in the current era of multidrug-resistant pathogens and a more limited therapeutic armamentarium. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 23, 2016 Category: Microbiology Authors: Glen T. Hansen Source Type: news

"It's A Scandal" -Daryl Hall on Doctors Denying Chronic Lyme
Growing up a musically-obsessed child in the 80's, Daryl Hall was one of my biggest inspirations. A masterful, inventive songwriter with an ocean of soul, he set me on the path to being an artist, to never waste a word, and to sing because I mean it. With six number ones and five additional top ten hits throughout the 70's and 80's Daryl Hall and John Oates are the number one duo in music history. Still at the top of his game at 69 years old, Daryl has won legions of new fans with his hit MTV Live show Live From Daryl's House. In February of 2015, at my very sickest from chronic Lyme and Bartonella, after it was missed b...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The trouble with antibiotics
Most people are aware of the potential downsides of taking an antibiotic. These side effects can range from allergic reactions to stomach upset, diarrhea, mental confusion, and in some cases, Clostridium difficile colitis – painful colon inflammation caused by a disruption in the normal balance of bacteria in the large intestine. However, more recently, concerns regarding the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasingly in the news. “Antimicrobial stewardship” promotes the appropriate use of antimicrobial agents, including antibiotics, in order to improve patient outcomes, reduce drug resis...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - July 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susan Farrell, MD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Infectious diseases Managing your health care Source Type: news

Clostridium tertium Bacteremia in a Patient with Febrile Neutropenia: Potential Benefit of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry
We report a patient with febrile neutropenia who developed Clostridium tertium bacteremia while receiving empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. The aerotolerance of C. tertium can result in its misidentification, thereby delaying diagnosis and the administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Such delays in high-risk oncology patients, especially those with febrile neutropenia, could result in serious complications and adverse outcomes. C. tertium was rapidly and reliably identified by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 12, 2016 Category: Microbiology Authors: María José González-Abad, Mercedes Alonso Sanz Source Type: news

Studies Show Early-Life Antibiotics Trigger Obesity in Pets
Most researchers agree that microbiota, much like all the organ systems of the body, is hugely important in terms of its impact on human and animal health. (In this context, microbiota, also called the "microbiome," is the collection of microorganisms that lives in and on the body.) Microbiota serve many beneficial functions, including controlling pathogens, supporting the immune system, and producing vitamins and short chain fatty acids. Currently there is exciting research underway into the microbiota of dogs and cats, and specifically, how it is impacted by the use of antibiotics. Many Common Pet Diseases A...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Inhaled Antibiotic Therapy for VAP and TracheobronchitisInhaled Antibiotic Therapy for VAP and Tracheobronchitis
Is inhaled antibiotic therapy a safe and effective treatment alternative for ventilator-associated respiratory infections? BMC Pulmonary Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Excessive antibiotic use is actually making staph infections stronger
(NaturalNews) Chronic overuse of antibiotics around the world has led to a phenomenon of traditional medicine's making: The very drugs developed to battle bacterial infections are actually making bacteria stronger and unresponsive to antibiotic therapy.As reported by Med Page... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: longer-term antibiotics won't ease chronic Lyme disease
Steven Reinberg and HealthDay News People with persistent symptoms associated with Lyme disease are unlikely to find relief from longer-term antibiotic therapy, according to a new Dutch study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antibiotics for Lyme Disease -- How Long is Enough?
How long to treat patients with Lyme remains an issue of controversy. With traditional antibiotic therapy, lasting 2-4 weeks, 10-20% of patients will have ongoing symptoms including fatigue, joint pain, insomnia, and complaints of “brain fog.” Indefinite long-term treatment is advocated by ILADS (International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society), based on a patient’s symptoms. In contrast, IDSA (Infectious Disease Society of America ) only recommends 2-4 weeks treatment. The two groups are bitter adversaries. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 31, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Judy Stone Source Type: news

Long-term antibiotic therapy ineffective for persistent Lyme symptoms
(Reuters Health) - Twelve weeks of antibiotic therapy proved ineffective at combating the long-term symptoms seen in some people who have had Lyme disease, a new test of 280 sufferers found. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Long-term antibiotics ineffective for persistent Lyme disease
Long-term is no better than standard antibiotic therapy for persistent symptoms of Lyme disease, according to a report published online March 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Randomized... (Source: Clinical Neurology News)
Source: Clinical Neurology News - March 30, 2016 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Long-term antibiotics ineffective for persistent Lyme disease
Long-term is no better than standard antibiotic therapy for persistent symptoms of Lyme disease, according to a report published online March 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Randomized... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - March 30, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Study: Longer-Term Antibiotics Won't Ease 'Chronic Lyme Disease'
WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 -- People with persistent symptoms associated with Lyme disease are unlikely to find relief from longer-term antibiotic therapy, according to a new Dutch study. Although antibiotics are the correct therapy to treat Lyme... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 30, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

What is the Recurrence Risk for Clostridium difficile Infection?
Discussion Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Clostridium difficile is an obligate, anaerobic, gram-positive bacillus that is spore-forming and toxin producing. It is resistant to acid, heat, antibiotics and many antiseptic agents. Spores are acquired from the environment or by oral-fecal route. Once in the colon, the bacteria attach and proliferate making vegetative forms. Two main toxins are produced which disrupt the colonic integrity. Toxin A (TcdA) is an endotoxin that disrupts the mucosal cells. Toxin B (TcdB) is a cytotoxin that is 1000x more potent than TcdA and causes a...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - March 28, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Prolonged Empirical Antibiotic Therapy in the ICUProlonged Empirical Antibiotic Therapy in the ICU
A study provides a snapshot assessment of the use of prolonged empirical antibiotic therapy in the ICU. Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) (Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines - February 23, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Infectious Diseases Commentary Source Type: news

What Serotypes Cause the Most Group B Streptococcal Disease?
Patient Presentation A 30-minute old, 39 2/7 week gestation female was admitted to the newborn nursery. The past medical history showed she was born to a G2P1 now 2, 28 year old mother who had received appropriate prenatal care. Her pregnancy had been complicated by group B streptococcus (GBS) positive vaginal colonization, but negative for GBS bacturia. She had rupture of membranes 7 hours prior to vaginal delivery and had received 2 doses of ampicillin at 6.5 and 3 hours prior to delivery. She had no intrapartum fever. Apgars were 8 and 9. The family history showed some diabetes and heart disease. The 2.5 year old sibli...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 22, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Lyme: The Infectious Disease Equivalent of Cancer, Says Top Duke Oncologist
Last week, I mentioned the case of Dr. Neil Spector, whose long-undiagnosed Lyme Disease resulted in irreversible heart failure and ultimately, a heart transplant. Dr. Spector, author of Gone in a Heartbeat: A Physician's Search for True Healing, is the Sandra Coates Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University School of Medicine. As the Director of Developmental Therapeutics at the Duke Cancer Institute, he's a leader in applying translational research to the clinical development of molecularly targeted personalized cancer therapies. Here, Dr. Spector share...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Targeted antibiotics may help protect against infections in men being tested for prostate cancer
(Wiley) A new review indicates that antimicrobial therapy given before clinicians take transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies to diagnose prostate cancer may lead to lower rates of sepsis, a potentially life-threatening infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 1, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Telemicrobiology: Focusing on Quality in an Era of Laboratory Consolidation
The misinterpretation of or delay in reporting Gram stains or other microscopic examinations negatively impacts patient safety and can lead to inappropriate treatment, including unnecessary test procedures, ineffective antimicrobial therapy, and increased length of stay. Conversely, when a positive blood culture or spinal fluid Gram stain is reported appropriately and quickly, deployment of appropriate treatment regimens is expedited and is directly associated with decreased patient morbidity and mortality, decreased hospital stay, and overall improvement in patient outcomes. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 29, 2016 Category: Microbiology Authors: A. Brian Mochon, Mike Santa Cruz Source Type: news

At What Age Does the Risk of Infant Listeria Infection Decrease?
Discussion Neonatal bacterial infections are commonly caused by Group B Streptococcus, enteric gram-negative organisms such as Escherichia coli, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, Listeria monocytogenes and Haemophilus influenza. Infections are usually because of transplacental infection or ascending infection from the mother’s genitourinary tract. Empiric treatment for suspected sepsis for neonates is usually combined IV aminoglycoside and expanded-spectrum penicillin antibiotic therapy in the US and Canada and this combination specifically covers for Listeria. Listeria monocytogenes was first discovered in 1927 an...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 25, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Feature Review: Probiotics for the prevention antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children
Should kids taking antibiotics also take probiotics?Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) occurs when antibiotics disturb the natural balance of "good" and "bad" bacteria in the intestinal tract, causing harmful bacteria to multiply beyond their normal numbers. The symptoms of AAD include frequent watery bowel movements and crampy abdominal pain. Probiotics are found in dietary supplements or yogurts and contain potentially beneficial bacteria or yeast. Probiotics may restore the natural balance of bacteria in the intestinal tract and prevent AAD. A team of Cochrane authors based in Canada and the U...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - January 14, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Class I Medical Device Recall: bioMérieux SA Etest® PIP/TAZO/CON-4 PTC 256 – Potential for Test Result Error
bioMérieux is recalling the Etest® PIP/TAZO/CON-4 PTC 256 because the test results from the affected product may indicate that antibiotic therapy using PIP/TAZO could stop or slow the growth of certain bacteria when it may not actually be effective in... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - December 29, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Lifestyle switching -- Bacillus cereus is able to resist certain antibiotic therapies
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) The pathogenic bacterium Bacillus cereus causes vomiting and diarrhoea as well as systemic and local infections. A team from the Vetmeduni Vienna has reported for the first time that B. cereus, following contact with certain antibiotics, can switch into a special slowed-down mode. The bacteria then form small colony variants (SVCs) that are difficult to diagnose and almost impossible to treat with certain antibiotics. This discovered mechanism may provide an alternative explanation for antibiotic resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 28, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Patient-administered antimicrobial infusions at home may allow shorter hospital stays
(PLOS) Patients trained to administer their own intravenous antibiotics at home (self-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy or S-OPAT), achieved similar or better outcomes compared to patients who received healthcare-delivered OPAT (H-OPAT) with assistance from a home-care nurse or skilled nursing facility, according to a paper published this week in PLOS Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 15, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy for Gram-Negative InfectionsAppropriate Antibiotic Therapy for Gram-Negative Infections
This review examines the effects of appropriate antibiotic therapy or inappropriate antibiotic therapy against gram-negative bacterial infections in the hospital setting. BMC Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - December 1, 2015 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news