Sometimes not doing surgery makes you a better surgeon
Having been surgically trained and surgically-minded, I’ve had expression ingrained in my psyche such as “a chance to cut is a chance to cure,” “when in doubt, cut it out” and “nothing can heal like cold, hard steel.” Indeed, as a surgeon, I see patients in my office and in the hospital with the specific question of whether or not surgery is indicated, what type of surgery and how urgently it needs to be performed. But coming up to my 20-year anniversary as a full-time faculty member at an academic medical center, I’ve noticed my own sea change in recommendations. Yes, I have...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/nina-shapiro" rel="tag" > Nina Shapiro, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

Ultrathin and Flexible Microfiber Sensor for Healthcare Monitoring and Diagnosis
Researchers at the National University of Singapore have developed an ultrathin, flexible microfiber sensor that can be worn on or placed next to the skin. The device can provide information on heart rate, blood pressure, and stiffness in blood vessels, and may one day replace bulky blood pressure and heart rate monitors. The technology might also be useful as a component in wearable devices that provide continuous health monitoring, or could help doctors with diagnostics. “Currently, doctors will monitor vital signs like heart rate and blood pressure when patients visit clinics. This requires equipment such as heart...
Source: Medgadget - November 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Diagnostics Medicine Source Type: blogs

Ingestible Biosensor for Tracking Opioid Use Following Acute Injury
This study provides important pilot data regarding the utility of the digital pill as an investigational tool for direct assessment of opioid ingestion and patient self-administration behavior.  In the future, the digital oxycodone pill could be used by physicians to monitor and identify escalating opioid use, and intervene in cases of suspected tolerance or addiction development. Flashback: Electronic Pills Powered by Gastric Acid to Guarantee Compliance: Interview with etectRx President & CEO Harry Travis… Study in journal Anesthesia and Analgesia: Oxycodone Ingestion Patterns in Acute Fracture ...
Source: Medgadget - November 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Iris Kulbatski Tags: Anesthesiology Medicine Pain Management Public Health Source Type: blogs

The Future of Emergency Medicine: Innovations Making Patients The Point-of-Care
Every minute spent without treatment could reduce the chance of survival in case of medical emergency and trauma patients. Digital health innovations making patients the point-of-care could become a great help for first responders and emergency units in the battle against time. Here, we collected what trends and technologies will have an impact on the future of emergency medicine. Six minutes before brain damage Car crashes, home injuries, fires, natural disasters. The difference between life and death often depends on the speed and efficiency of emergency care services. The work of doctors, paramedics, and nurses being in...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 28, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: imported CPR digital health emergency emergency medicine EMS first aid first response future Health 2.0 Healthcare Innovation technology Source Type: blogs

Minding your body: Interoceptive awareness, mindfulness and living well
This study aimed to establish the relationship between various items on two questionnaires used to measure IA and DM: the MAIA (Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness), and the FFMQ (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire). The paper itself discusses the first measure as empirically derived and confirmed by focus groups, and having associations with less trait anxiety, emotional susceptibility and depression – in other words, high scores on this measure (awareness of body sensations and judging those sensations) are associated with important factors influencing our wellbeing. The second measure is descr...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - November 26, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Resilience Science in practice biopsychosocial Health mindfulness self management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs

Navigating the minefield of medical speak in your relationship
An excerpt from Love in the time of medical school: Build a happy, healthy relationship with a medical student. My dad is the oldest of four boys and my grandfather was an anesthe­siologist for many years. Apparently, the women who wanted to marry into the family all had to pass the “test” of listening to my grandfather tell gory surgery stories over dinner. My mother tells me about one particular dinner with my grandparents that simultaneously involved hearing a story about in­testines coming out of the body and being served spaghetti for dinner. While my mother passed that test, I assuredly would...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 25, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sarah-epstein" rel="tag" > Sarah Epstein < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Opioid crisis: Could the'pain-o-meter' be a solution? - USA Today
Every year, millions of Americans will go to their doctors complaining of pain, and their doctors will ask them to rate their degree of discomfort on a zero-to-10 scale, or using a range of smiley-face symbols.The doctor will have to take their word for it. And then, all too often, the doctor will prescribe a powerful and addictive opioid painkiller.It's a longstanding — if imprecise and subjective — way of measuring and treating pain. And it's at least partly responsible for starting an opioid addiction crisis that killed 64,000 people last year."One of the things we heard from many physicians is ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 23, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

There Are Lots Of Exciting Visions For Digital Health Out There! I Often Wonder How Real They Are?
Three forward looking articles appeared last week:First we had:How data is ushering in the era of personalised healthcareAI, augmented reality and vast amounts of data will help drive a new revolution in healthcare, Murray Brozinsky says.Rohan Pearce (Computerworld) 15 November, 2017 06:00 Roughly every half century, there ’s an innovation that drives a revolution in healthcare, according to Murray Brozinsky. In the 1840s it was the use of anaesthesia in surgery; in the 1870s, germ theory. Then in the 1920s penicillin was discovered, and in the 1970s evidence-based medicine emerged on the back of the use of rand...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - November 22, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

The Power of the Placebo - Slate
Every so often, a new study comes along that challenges conventional wisdom in medicine or science. When the conditions are right, these studies can generate a lot of attention in both the popular press and the medical community. In early November, one of these such studies, called the ORBITA study, was published in the Lancet by a group of cardiologists.The authors had set out to ask and answer a simple question: Does placement of a small wire mesh (called a stent) inside the artery that feeds blood to the heart (the coronary artery) relieve chest pain? One might ask what was novel about this question. The truth is that t...
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 21, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Why We Need Emergency Radiology Now More Than Ever
Emergency radiology requires radiologists to shapeshift into precise and calculated emergency physicians. From University of California Los Angeles to the Royal Manchester Children ’s Hospital, here are some examples of how the radiology department has become a crucial component of emergency services. When a suicide bomb explosion injured 250 people at an Ariana Grande concert on Monday, May 22, 2017, pediatric radiologist Rui Santos, MD, spent all night conducting low-dose full-body scans of the wounded fans. Many of the victims of the attack had secondary blast injuries as a result of the nuts, bolts, and screws th...
Source: radRounds - November 17, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New painkillers could thwart opioids ’ fatal flaw | Science | AAAS
When people die from overdoses of opioids, whether prescription pain medications or street drugs, it is the suppression of breathing that almost always kills them. The drugs act on neuronal receptors to dull pain, but those in the brain stem also control breathing. When activated, they can signal respiration to slow, and then stop. The results are well-known: an epidemic of deaths —about 64,000 people in the United States alone last year.Countering this lethal side effect without losing opioids' potent pain relief is a challenge that has enticed drug developers for years. Now, for the first time, the U.S. Food an...
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 17, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Usono ProbeFix Introduces Continuous, Hands-Free Ultrasound to The World
Usono, a company based in The Netherlands, has created a new kind of ultrasound accessory that is an important diagnostic tool as well as a way to improve reproducibility of ultrasound images. ProbeFix is a fixation system for transthoracic ultrasound probes that allows doctors to effortlessly image patients’ hearts without having to strain to hold the probe in place during exams. At World of Health Care 2017 held in Holland earlier this year, visitors voted Usono the winner of the Smart Solutions Award. ProbeFix looks like a harness and is put on the patient before a cardiac ultrasound exam begins. Thanks to the des...
Source: Medgadget - November 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Yuriy Sarkisov Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Medicine Source Type: blogs

Researchers Discover Where the Earliest Signs of Alzheimer's Occur in the Brain
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have for the first time shown where in the brain the earliest signs of Alzheimer's occur.ByAlzheimer's Reading RoomThe discovery could potentially become significant to future Alzheimer's research while contributingto improved diagnostics."A big piece of the puzzle in Alzheimer's research is now falling into place."We did not know where in the brain the earliest stages of the disease could be detected.We now know which parts of the brain are to be studied to eventually explain why the disease occurs."What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaSubscr...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - November 16, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: Alzheimers Dementia alzheimers research alzheimersreadingroom brain brain test health memory loss memory test science Source Type: blogs

Physicians: Be nice to your pregnant colleagues
After about the first week of anesthesia residency, I was told, “Don’t get pregnant, you are going to ruin the call schedule.”  Initially, I took it as a joke because I was getting married that year and I wasn’t thinking of having children yet, but I did think, “what if it happened accidentally?” After it’s told to you over and over again by your male co-residents and even some of my attendings, it pretty much sticks.  Got it, don’t get pregnant; otherwise, everyone else is going to be ticked that they are now taking extra call to cover mine. Fast forward a few year...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 14, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/avani-trivedi" rel="tag" > Avani Trivedi, DO < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Practice Management Surgery Source Type: blogs

Why Hospitals Are Losing Serious Money And What That Means For Your Future
This article examines the economic struggles of inpatient facilities, the even harsher realities in front of them, and why hospitals are likely to aggravate, not address, healthcare’s rising cost issues. According to the Harvard Business Review, several big-name hospitals reported significant declines and, in some cases, net losses to their FY 2016 operating margins. Among them, Partners HealthCare, New England’s largest hospital network, lost $108 million; the Cleveland Clinic witnessed a 71% decline in operating income; and MD Anderson, the nation’s largest cancer center, dropped $266 million. How did s...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Manage pain – or aim to cure? Why I ’ m committed to pain management
Prominent researchers, clinicians and commentators seem to suggest that aiming to help people live with their pain is aiming too low. That pain cure or at least reduction is The Thing To Do. It’s certainly got a bit of a ring to it – “I can help get rid of your pain” has a sex appeal that “I can help you live with your pain” doesn’t have. And I can recognise the appeal. Persistent pain can be a scourge for those who live with it; it can eat away at every part of life. Imagine waking up one day to find NO PAIN! Excited much? So why do I keep hammering on about this not very glamorou...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - November 12, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Professional topics Research Resilience/Health Science in practice acceptance function healthcare self management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs

Drugstore pain pills as effective as opioids in ER patients - AP
Emergency rooms are where many patients are first introduced to powerful opioid painkillers, but what if doctors offered over-the-counter pills instead? A new study tested that approach on patients with broken bones and sprains and found pain relievers sold as Tylenol and Motrin worked as well as opioids at reducing severe pain.The results challenge common ER practice for treating short-term, severe pain and could prompt changes that would help prevent new patients from becoming addicted.The study has limitations: It only looked at short-term pain relief in the emergency room and researchers didn't evaluate how patient...
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 7, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Taking the Guesswork Out of Pain Management
How do you measure pain? A patient’s furrowed brow, a child’s cries or tears—all are signs of pain. But what if the patient suffers from severe dementia and can’t describe what she is feeling or is a young child who can’t yet talk? Caregivers can help read the signs of pain, but their interpretations may differ greatly from patient to patient, because people have different ways of showing discomfort. And when the patient is unconscious, such as during surgery or while in intensive care, the caregiving team has even fewer ways to measure pain. Patients can point to one of the faces on this su...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - November 7, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Barbara Vann Tags: Pharmacology Anesthesiology Medicines Pain Source Type: blogs

For an anesthesiologist, this is the hardest part of medicine
As a cardiac anesthesiologist, there are times I care for patients who are faced with a tough decision: to take their chance on a very high-risk surgery, or let nature take its course.  It is in these times I feel most humble and most human, as I may be the last one to hear the last words they speak. Recently I was at a social event and introducing myself to some new people. A friend of mine was standing next to me, and she told me “Sasha, do you realize you’re kind of a touchy person? You reach out and touch each person you meet. That’s not normal.” At first, I was kind of stunned, then I real...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 7, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sasha-k-shillcutt" rel="tag" > Sasha K. Shillcutt, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

Medical students must have this mindset
It is early on a Saturday morning when I walk out of the elevator of Doan Hall looking for a nursing desk to call the fourth-year anesthesiology resident I am supposed to be shadowing. Instead, I am met with a set of double doors and a staff-only sign. Before walking through the doors, I decided to read the placard placed on the wall next to them. As I begin to read, I hear footsteps approaching and turn to my right only to be met with the resident who immediately informs me of an emergency C-section that she was just called into. She instructs me to hang my white coat on the wall and grab a scrub cap. Then she speeds away...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 6, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/manisha-ravi%e2%80%8b" rel="tag" > Manisha Ravi ​ < /a > Tags: Education Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Source Type: blogs

What ’ s the biggest barrier to learning more?
Reading and engaging with clinicians online and face-to-face, it’s clear to me that effectively integrating psychosocial factors into daily clinical reasoning, especially amongst physical or manual therapists, is a real challenge. There’s enough research around showing how poorly these factors are identified and then factored in to change what we do and how we do it for me to be convinced of this. What intrigues me, though, is why – given psychosocial risk factors have, in NZ, been around since 1997 – it’s still a problem. It’s not ignorance. It’s not holding an alternative viewpoi...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - November 5, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Assessment Clinical reasoning Pain Pain conditions Professional topics Psychology Science in practice biopsychosocial healthcare pain management Research Source Type: blogs

Healcerion Receives FDA Clearance for New SONON 300L Wireless, App-based Ultrasound System
Healcerion, based in South Korea, was the first company to receive FDA clearance for their wireless, app-based ultrasound system back in 2015. The groundbreaking work done by South Korean engineers and scientists laid the foundation for the development of an ultrasound transducer that works with most smartphones or tablets. Since introducing the SONON 300C convex transducer, the company has been making progress to further advance this branch of ultrasound devices. Their latest, the SONON 300L linear transducer, weighs only 13 ounces (370 grams) including the battery, and features color doppler mode for easier musculoskelet...
Source: Medgadget - November 3, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Yuriy Sarkisov Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Radiology Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

World ’s First MRI Compatible Patient Monitor Cleared by FDA
Traditional vital signs monitors found in most patient hospital rooms can’t be taken into the MRI suite, as that may lead to tragicomic consequences. A patient requiring close monitoring has to be transferred to a specialty monitor attached to a heavy cart that prevents it from being sucked into the bore of the MRI’s magnet, or monitor has to be kept outside of the the MRI room. That’s about to change thanks to FDA clearing the Iradimed 3880 MRI compatible patient vital signs monitoring system. The patient can now be transported from the ER or ICU, directly to the MRI suite and back, without stopping and&...
Source: Medgadget - November 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Radiology Source Type: blogs

Weird and Wild: Scalp Abscesses and Kerions
​Welcome back to the weird and wild, "what do I do with that?" series! We want to take you back to the magical land of abscesses. This scalp abscess case study and Procedural Pause pearl will help you relieve significant pain and decrease the risk for skin infections and complications. This case made it to our weird and wild list for being rare and interesting.​Scalp abscesses and kerions can be tricky and complicated. At first glance, they can appear small and harmless. They are often underappreciated for this reason, but require immediate attention. There are several types of wound infections and rashes tha...
Source: The Procedural Pause - November 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

What I ’ve learned from 547 doctor suicides
Five years ago today I was at a memorial. Another suicide. Our third doctor in 18 months. Everyone kept whispering, “Why?” I was determined to find out. So I started counting dead doctors. I left the service with a list of 10. Now I have 547. Immediately, I began writing and speaking about suicide. So many distressed doctors (and med students) wrote and phoned me. Soon I was running a de facto international suicide hotline from my home. To date, I’ve spoken to thousands of suicidal doctors; published a book of their suicide letters (free audiobook); attended more funerals; in...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A resident ’s dream turns into cold reality
It’s every emergency resident’s dream to be part of a big procedure: The rush of a heart-pounding, adrenaline-filled moment of slamming in a chest tube, “criching” someone or being part of the big show — a thoracotomy. The holy grail. Cracking a chest, performing intracardiac massage, cross-clamping the aorta. A last-ditch effort to pull a patient away from the clutches of the grim reaper. A typical level-one center hums to life when a paramedic call comes in of a penetrating trauma to the box. Everyone and their mothers run down to the ED. There is, of course, the ED team, the trauma surgery ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/zahir-basrai" rel="tag" > Zahir Basrai, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Residency Source Type: blogs

Shift Labs Wins 2017 Global Health Innovator Award at The MedTech Conference
Shift Labs is the winner of the 2017 Global Health Innovator Award. The award was presented at The MedTech Conference which took place last month in Santa Clara, CA. This is the award’s inaugural year and was a result of the conference’s new Innovations in Global Health Program, which puts a focus on medical innovation in the developing world. In addition to the recognition of their technology’s sustainability and impact in resource-constrained areas, Shift Labs also receives $50,000 with the award provided by both TEAMFund and MedTech Innovator with support from industry leaders including BD, Medtronic, ...
Source: Medgadget - October 31, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Butterfly iQ, a Whole Body Ultrasound That Fits in a Pocket
Butterfly Network, a firm based in Guilford, Connecticut, won FDA clearance and is introducing its Butterfly iQ portable ultrasound system. It consists of a portable transducer that connects directly to an iPhone, and an iOS app to display the images and to control settings. The device actually works as three different transducers thanks to an ultra wide band matrix array. This allows a clinician to perform a bunch of different scans and for the Butterfly iQ to be applicable in different clinical settings. The matrix array of microelectromechanical (MEMS) sensors is directly integrated onto an integrated circuit that conta...
Source: Medgadget - October 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Pediatrics Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Inscope Direct, The First Laryngoscope with Built-In Suction, Unveiled
Inscope Medical Solutions, a company based in Jeffersonville, Indiana, just announced its Inscope Direct, a laryngoscope with built-in suction capability. This is apparently the first device to integrate controllable suction within a laryngoscope, avoiding having the physician to switch between yankauer suction and advancing the endotracheal tube. This can help speed up patient intubation, particularly benefiting in emergencies. The device includes two suction inlets that together prevent clogging by making it easy for secretions and blood to pass through and away from the vocal chords. It works with standard tubing a...
Source: Medgadget - October 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Why opioids are such an American problem - BBC News
For every one million Americans, almost 50,000 doses of opioids are taken every day. That's four times the rate in the UK.There are often good reasons for taking opioids. Cancer patients use them for pain relief, as do patients recovering from surgery (codeine and morphine are opioids, for example).But take too many and you have a problem. And America certainly has a problem.More ...http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-41701718 (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 29, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

The gap in managing pain
If you’ve read my blog for any period of time you’ll know that I like practical research, and research that helps clinicians do what they do with humanity, compassion and evidence. One really enormous gap in the field is rarely mentioned: how do clinicians pull their assessment findings together and use them for clinical reasoning? Especially if you’re part of an interprofessional team (or work in a biopsychosocial framework). The silence in the pain literature is deafening! There are any number of articles on what can be included in an initial assessment, most of them based on the idea that if factor X i...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - October 29, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Assessment Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Interdisciplinary teams Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice biopsychosocial pain management rehabilitation Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs

Why this anesthesiologist says “no” to fentanyl
No, I’m not talking about putting fentanyl into my own veins — a remarkably bad idea. I’m questioning the habitual, reflex use of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, in clinical anesthesiology practice. I’ve been teaching clinical anesthesiology, supervising residents and medical students, in the operating rooms of academic hospitals for the past 18 years. Anesthesiology residents often ask if I “like” fentanyl, wanting to know if we’ll plan to use it in an upcoming case. My response always is, “I don’t have emotional relationships with drugs. They are tools in our toolbox, t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 26, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/karen-s-sibert" rel="tag" > Karen S. Sibert, MD < /a > Tags: Meds Pain Management Surgery Source Type: blogs

Caring for patients all the way (bills included)
Within doctors’ examination rooms, operating rooms and waiting rooms, clinicians and other staff know the importance of empathy. Caring for patients and loved ones extends beyond one’s medical skills. It also requires a good heart. As sign-up time for 2018 medical insurance approaches, patients look for a meaningful differentiator in health care providers when deciding whether to stick with their health plan, their primary care provider, and other doctors. On the medical side of our industry, health care systems line up to talk about how caring their doctors and nurses are – and overall, they’re pre...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 26, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/ted-matthews" rel="tag" > Ted Matthews, MBA < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Mindray Introduces Neuromuscular Transmission Module to Confirm Neuromuscular Blocks
At the American Society of Anesthesiologists annual meeting in Boston this week, Mindray, a Shenzhen, China firm, introduced its Neuromuscular Transmission (NMT) Module for the company’s Passport 17m and 12m patient monitors. The device sends electric signals through the fingers and measures how the body responds to the stimulation. The technology provides a pretty clear indication whether a patient is properly relaxed when on a neuromuscular block. The data related to the NMT test is visible on the Passport monitor’s display and can be uploaded to an electronic medical record or an anesthesia info sy...
Source: Medgadget - October 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Contrary to popular belief, epidurals don ’ t prolong labor. Phew.
This study confirms what many of us suspected. Women don’t need the incentive or focus of pain to push a baby out. They need verbal support and guidance! There’s no other place in medicine where we would subject a woman to pain and not offer pain relief. And now we can do so without women feeling guilt or fault if they have a cesarean (not that they should ever feel that way — except they do). The post Contrary to popular belief, epidurals don’t prolong labor. Phew. appeared first on Harvard Health Blog. (Source: Harvard Health Blog)
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hope Ricciotti, MD Tags: Health Pain Management Pregnancy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Author Reading: What Did You Learn Today?
A new episode of our podcast is now available through iTunes. Listen today. “Tell me one thing you learned today,” Dr. Saundra Curry asks each day. What started as a way to remember the many anesthesiology residents who passed through her ORs turned into an opportunity for the author and her residents to reflect on their experiences and enhance their learning. Dr. Curry’s essay was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the October issue of Academic Medicine. (Source: Academic Medicine Blog)
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 24, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective assessment bedside learning feedback reflection teaching and learning moments Source Type: blogs

Federal Pain Research Strategy Overview | Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee
The NIH Office of Pain Policy is pleased to announce the release of the Federal Pain Research Strategy.The Federal Pain Research Strategy (FPRS) is an effort of the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC) and the National Institutes of Health, Office of Pain Policy to oversee development of a long-term strategic plan to advance the federal pain research agenda. The strategy is relevant to the missions all federal agencies and departments that support pain research. The research priorities of the FPRS are intended to guide strategic research planning and to support funding decisions that will fill cruc...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 21, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Interagency Pain Research Portfolio -The Federal Government's Pain Research Database
The Interagency Pain Research Portfolio database provides information on pain research and training activities supported by the Federal Government. The participating agencies – AHRQ, CDC, DoD, FDA, NIH, and VA – are represented on the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC), a Federal advisory committee to enhance pain research efforts and promote collaboration across the government.https://paindatabase.nih.gov/ (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 21, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Here ’s why women doctors need time together
The 2nd Annual Women in Anesthesiology Conference is taking place in October. Developing this organization has been a labor of, if not love, then honoring. We are honoring a value system that works to gives women the respect, autonomy, and power they deserve. There is an amazing power in gathering, shared experiences and decreasing isolation. Nobody has identical life experiences. But part of what informs our identity is shared experiences. As anesthesiologists, we did not all do the same residencies. But we all know what it is like to discuss a surprise difficult airway, an ejection fraction of 15 percent in a demented pa...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/rekha-chandrabose" rel="tag" > Rekha Chandrabose, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Surgery Source Type: blogs

OptiScanner 5000 Cleared in U.S. for Continuous Glucose Monitoring in ICU
OptiScan Biomedical, a company based in Hayward, California, won FDA clearance to introduce its OptiScanner 5000 in the U.S. The device is intended for use in intensive care units to continuously monitor blood plasma glucose levels, something the OptiScanner 5000 can do accurately without having to be regularly calibrated. The device works via an integrated blood centrifuge and spectrometer to provide directly measured plasma-based glucose levels in critically ill patients. The OptiScanner 5000 relies on a single-use disposable cartridge that is swapped out for every patient. Once activated, clinicians can see both real-t...
Source: Medgadget - October 18, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Neurology Neurosurgery Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Esaote Unveils Its Flagship MyLab9 Ultrasound System
Esaote, the Italian ultrasound manufacturer, has just unveiled its brand new high-end MyLab9 ultrasound system. The device is designed for all sorts of diagnostic imaging procedures and clinical environments. The MyLab9 features non-composite single crystal probe technology and “Ultra-engine” platform that together generate high quality images in a variety of cases from OB/GYN to cardio to lesion detection. The new system includes something called easyMode, a software feature that automatically optimizes scans with minimal input from the user via a small built-in touch screen. Esaote’s i-motion techn...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Pediatrics Radiology Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Getting persistent pain and disability confused
As I read blogs and tweets and posts on social media, and even peer reviewed papers in journals, I often read that what we’re trying to do in sub-acute pain management is to prevent chronic pain from developing (note, when I talk about pain that goes on beyond healing, more than three months, or has no useful function, I may use the term “chronic” or I may use the more recent term “persistent” – they mean the same thing, except persistent has perhaps less baggage…). I want to take aim at that focus – to prevent pain from persisting – and think carefully about it. Let&r...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - October 15, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Pain conditions Professional topics acceptance biopsychosocial disability healthcare pain management rehabilitation science treatment Source Type: blogs

Kneel
While watching my son at a weekend hockey game last weekend I overheard a conversation an older, wealthy-appearing woman was having with her companion. I pretended to be reading (I ’m the bad dad who only watches the game when his own son is out on a shift) while she orated (in a faux, poorly executed, Mid Atlantic English nasal accent) a story she had heard from “down in Texas” about how arighteous high school coach had kicked two players off his team who had the gall and traitorous audacity to kneel during the pre-game rendering of the national anthem. “Whaaaaaat are they eeeeeven p...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - October 8, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

Though Much Maligned, BVM is a Good Tool
​I’ve heard for years in emergency medicine circles that it was impossible to preoxygenate with a bag-valve mask (BVM) unless one is actually compressing the bag and forcing oxygen flow to the patient. I recently did an informal survey of my colleagues at work, and the responses varied from confident affirmation that the BVM was an inadequate tool for preoxygenation to quasi-warnings not to tread on this dogma without first consulting anesthesia or respiratory therapy. What started as a simple quest to clarify whether the dogma about BVMs and preoxygenation was true turned into a fascinating review and new personal...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - October 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Pre-Op Day
Today is pre-op day. Tomorrow I am having minor arthroscopic knee surgery. Its no big deal. An in and out procedure that should last an hour or so. Nothing significant. It is to repair my right knee which has been locking up for the last year or so.What it does mean is that I am going to be limited in my abilities to get around for the next week or so. I do not plan on using crutches because I hate them (and I have lymphedema). I really hate crutches. We live in a raised ranch and I bought a can so I should be able to maneuver around the one floor by myself.My husband has taken tomorrow and Friday off and then will be home...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - October 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: knee pain organization planning surgery Source Type: blogs

Jellybean 78 Toby Fogg – ipsa scientia potestas est
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog “ipsa scientia potestas est” Toby Fogg talks to Matt McPartlin about the ever growing Airway Registry ANZEDAR This is FOAMed. Thus there are a lot of people that are nothing short of obsessed with airways. It’s as if humans were primarily a giant “Pass the Parcel” game with a super difficult intubation inside. This will allow us individually to be the airway super-hero that we know we are. Or do we really know? We don’t have sup...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - October 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean ANZEDAR Matt McPartlin toby fogg Source Type: blogs

Back to basics about psychosocial factors and pain – v
I’ve been writing about psychosocial factors and pain but I realise that I haven’t actually defined what I mean by psychosocial factors. The strange thing about this term is that it’s often conflated with “psychological” or “psychopathological” when it’s actually not. So… where to begin? The Collins English Dictionary defines psychosocial as: “of or relating to processes or factors that are both social and psychological in origin”, while the Oxford English Dictionary defines it as “Of or relating to the interrelation of social factors and individual t...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - October 1, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Pain conditions Professional topics Research biopsychosocial Health pain management science Source Type: blogs