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Masimo ’s Slim and Portable Rad-97 Pulse CO-Oximeter FDA Cleared and Now Available
Masimo won FDA clearance and just announced full market release of its Rad-97 Pulse CO-Oximeter. It’s available as is, or with either a built-in blood pressure cuff or a capnography (CO2) attachments. The monitor comes with Masimo’s well established Measure-through Motion and Low Perfusion SET pulse oximetry and its rainbow technologies. The device has a narrow, space saving design, sporting a high definition touch screen through which all the settings are accessed. It has an internal rechargeable battery that provides enough juice for about four hours. It seems like it would be perfectly suited ...
Source: Medgadget - September 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

back in the saddle again
So here's the thing about going back to school when you really haven't been in the classroom for the past...oh, let's say 16 years. (I am lopping off the last two years of med school in this calculation, since that was really more clinical than didactic, and really more indentured servitude than clinical.)First of all, I can't remember the last time I've had to sit still for as long as I was in class over the course of the last weekend. And I'mold! Sitting still should be my default state at this point, and as I get older I expect I'll get increasingly horizontal until finally, I'm dead. (Meanwhile, also because old: remin...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 20, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

An August Appendectomy
In August, (one month ago today)I had an appendectomy. There was very little drama involved, the doctors office visit led straight to a same day CT scan and an emergency review with the radiologist who informed me the appendix couldn't be seen but the colon was most definitely inflamed and I should go to the ER if it got worse. To the ER I went that night, to a hospital where the D Care is very good (had that going for it). They admitted me under observation, coursing enough pain medications through me to make me sick for the next 14 hours. The plan was to do another CT the next day. In observation, as I was trying not to ...
Source: The D-Log Cabin - September 20, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Authors: HVS Source Type: blogs

Mastering Intensive Care 016 with Charles Gomersall
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Charles Gomersall – Training junior doctors in the BASIC practice of intensive care How did you feel the first day you worked in ICU? Was it like walking on the moon? So foreign, because you didn’t understand much about the machines, the techniques, or even the words that were being used. That’s what it felt like for me, all those years ago. Thanks to one of my consultants who really “held my hand” on that first day, I was OK, but I wi...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 18, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Education Andrew Davies basic charles gomersall Mastering Intensive Care training doctors Source Type: blogs

Back to basics about psychosocial factors and pain – iii
Last week I discussed some of the areas in the brain, and basic principles, that are currently thought to influence our pain experience. This week I thought I’d introduce one of my favourite ways of considering pain mechanisms, mainly because it helps me think through the four main kinds of mechanisms, and can influence our treatment approach. At this stage I want to raise my hand to acknowledge the following: My gratitude to Dr John Alchin, longtime friend and colleague, who first pointed this paper out to me and has shared it with hundreds of people who go to see him at the local tertiary pain management centre. W...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - September 17, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Education Pain Pain conditions Research Science in practice biopsychosocial Chronic pain Health pain management Source Type: blogs

Here ’s how your attitude affects patients
I have a very interesting job: I travel around the country providing neuromonitoring to surgeons in the operating room. I’m also an anesthesiologist assistant, certified and licensed to provide anesthesia. Throughout my ten-year career in the OR, I’ve been the guest of nearly a hundred hospitals in the U.S. and the UK. No two hospitals are the same. My career has allowed me to meet hundreds of incredibly caring doctors, nurses and staff who are all doing amazing things. However, without a doubt, I always encounter staff members who just want to do their job. No more, no less — they care for their patients...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lauren-feltz" rel="tag" > Lauren Feltz < /a > Tags: Patient Hospital-Based Medicine Patients Primary Care Surgery Source Type: blogs

Medical Gawking Case Points to Need for Culture Change
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. According to a news report in The Washington Post, a number of medical staff at a Pittsburgh hospital have been reprimanded over a gross violation of a patient’s privacy. The patient was under anesthesia and a crowd of staff gathered to watch and take photos of “a patient’s genitals with a foreign object protrusion.” Many photos were shared with others. The “crowd” was significant and consisted of more people than those involved with the patient’s care.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 15, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Cultural Featured Posts Informed Consent Media Privacy professional ethics #medicalgawking Source Type: blogs

Fall 2017 Issue of Findings Magazine
It’s back! Check out the new issue of Findings magazine. Findings presents cutting-edge research from scientists in diverse biomedical fields. The articles are aimed at high school students with the goal of making science—and the people who do it—interesting and exciting, and to inspire young readers to pursue careers in biomedical research. In addition to putting a face on science, Findings offers activities such as quizzes and crossword puzzles and, in its online version, video interviews with scientists. The Fall 2017 issue profiles Yale University biologist Enrique De La Cruz, who studies how actin&md...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - September 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Chris Palmer Tags: Being a Scientist Cell Biology Chemistry and Biochemistry Computers in Biology Cool Images Field Focus Genetics Pharmacology Physical Trauma and Sepsis Structural Biology Source Type: blogs

Back to basics about psychosocial factors and pain (ii)
But what about the bio? No, not the biographical, the biological! It’s something I often get asked – like “if you think pain is psychological/psychosocial factors play a part then you’re obviously not including the biological” – oh woe is me, for no, pain definitely involves the biological. But it’s not quite as simple as we’ve come to believe. Let’s begin at the very beginning. Can we have pain – and not know about it? The answer is – no, and that’s exactly why anaesthetics are used. The distinction between pain and nociception is that it’s enti...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - September 10, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Pain Pain conditions Research Science in practice biopsychosocial theory Source Type: blogs

high water mark
Hurricane Irma hasn't arrive in our area yet, but somehow she's already caused some flooding here.(We were trying to fill our bathtub with clean water in case anything came up, but then we lost track of how full the bathtub was getting and it overflowed. This reminds me of when we're starting a case in the OR, make a hash of the A-line or central line or what have you, and dryly note, " Anesthesia EBL: 10 mL. " We caused the very problem we were trying to avoid.)So, Hurricane Irma's set to arrive here tomorrow. Our friends to the south obviously have itmuch worse than us, so it feels insulting to even tangentiall...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 10, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

the cider house RULES!
...is a joke that has surely never been made before!(Sorry John Irving. Maybe if your books weren't so f.ing depressing people wouldn't need to make jokes about them to laugh through the pain. A Prayer for Owen Meany? More like A Prayer for Owen SADDIE, am I right?)(I'll...show myself out.)Anyway. Where was I? Oh right. Today we went apple picking, because it's fall and the weather is beautiful and there's no way you would know that Hurricaine Irma will be up in our zone by the day after tomorrow. (Though hopefully just a tropical storm by then. Floridian friends, stay safe.) My kids like to pick things (noses, fruit, and ...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 9, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Cost Estimator Tools Evolving; Consumers Can Compare Prices
I have posted multiple notes about the opacity of healthcare pricing, particularly that of hospital bills (see, for example:Maryland Controls Hospital Prices; Now Wants to Cap Overall Hospital Spending;Coding for Hospital Services; One Reason for the High Cost of Healthcare). There has been some progress in making prices more transparent and a recent article went into great detail about this topic (see:Is the price right? Solving healthcare ’s transparency problem). In today's note, I will only address healthcare cost-estimator tools but read this whole article if you are interested. Below is an excerpt from it:T...
Source: Lab Soft News - September 8, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Cost of Healthcare Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Insurance Medical Consumerism Source Type: blogs

office space
That face when you realize that instead of havingone written assignment due for your Healthcare Management class on Thursday, you actually havethree written assignments due.Where do you find a place to do work? I've always had trouble really getting work done at home.Always. It's not a matter of not having enough space. I have space.Physical space, I mean. We even have a room designated as an " office, " though in recent years there has been some creep as one kid or two have gradually taken over my desk to use my computer for this that or the other thing. But it doesn't even really matter--even with the separate ...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 8, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

Surgical Pen Can Identify Cancer in Real-Time
Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have developed a hand-held surgical “pen” that can analyze tissue samples and tell a surgeon if they are cancerous in just a few seconds. During surgery to remove a tumor, surgeons need to know if they have removed the entire tumor margins, as leaving just a small piece of neoplasm could mean that it grows back. Often the tumor looks very similar to healthy tissue, making it difficult to distinguish, and a surgeon will sometimes remove large areas of healthy tissue to make sure that they remove all the cancerous cells. This can cause unnecessary pain and prolonge...
Source: Medgadget - September 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Neurosurgery Ob/Gyn Thoracic Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

reading the room
I'm going to be out of town for four days next week (see:yesterday's post), so I signed up to be the " parent reader " for Nina's kindergarten class today. Because of guilt. Oh yeah, also I wanted to promote literacy and volunteer my time and surprise my kid at school. But mainly guilt.I've done this " parent reader " gig a few times in the past, and I've learned a few things along the way. The first time I did it this, when Cal was in Pre-K, it took a lot more planning and schedule swapping (I was still working full time back then), so it was a higher pressure situation all around. I actually had to ge...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 7, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

back to school
I've enjoyed seeing everyone's back to school photos of social media these past few weeks, though they make me realize that I must be either one click off age-wise or else totally disconnected from current parenting trends, as I have never in my life taken a picture of my kid holding a sign (or if you want to get real fancy, ablackboard) broadcasting what grade they were going into. (Another trend that either came later or else that I just totally ignored was that thing where you put agiant sticker on the front of your kids'onesie telling everyone how many months old they are.) I mean, not that I don't take a picture of my...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 6, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

GlideScope Go, a New Portable Video Laryngoscope
Verathon, a company that’s part of Roper Technologies, has released a new portable video laryngoscope, the GlideScope Go. It can be taken to sporting events, disaster zones, or used inside the hospital for routine and “emergent” procedures wherever intubation and/or imaging of the airway is required. GlideScope is already a well respected name among anesthesiologists and ER clinicians. This new spiffy device has a 3.5″ color screen that can be tilted up and down, and it and the rest of the devices are wipeable, and even submersible. Cleaning is therefore is simplified, resembling that of many o...
Source: Medgadget - September 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine ENT Military Medicine Source Type: blogs

The First Count of Fentanyl Deaths in 2016: Up 540% in Three Years - The New York Times
Drug overdoses killed roughly 64,000 people in the United States last year, according to the first governmental account of nationwide drug deaths to cover all of 2016. It's a staggering rise of more than 22 percent over the 52,404 drug deaths recorded the previous year — and even higher than The New York Times's estimatein June, which was based on earlier preliminary data.Drug overdoses are expected to remain the leading cause of death for Americans under 50, as synthetic opioids — primarily fentanyl and its analogues — continue to push the death count higher. Drug deaths involving fentanyl more t...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 5, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Pain News - Medical Xpress
https://medicalxpress.com/search/sort/date/3d/?search=pain (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 5, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

shovel all the coal in, gotta keep it rollin' / woo, woo, Chattanooga, there you are
(I know I said I'd update Chattanooga Day Two yesterday, but I LIED.)Day Two in Chattanooga had a leisurely start. We had one destination in mind (about which more later), but this place did not open until noon, and we had some time to kill before then. So we decided to take a five minute-ish walk over to theChattanooga Choo Choo for brunch.The Chattanooga Choo Choo is a hotel built in an old decommissioned railway station, with guest rooms both inside the terminal building and in the Pullman train cars, the latter of which are on the old rails out back behind the lobby. Don't get me wrong, our Air BnB was nice, but if I h...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 5, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

Opioids Aren ’t the Only Pain Drugs to Fear - The New York Times
Last month, a White House panel declared the nation's epidemic of opioid abuse and deaths"a national public health emergency," a designation usually assigned to natural disasters.A disaster is indeed what it is, with 142 Americans dying daily from drug overdoses, a fourfold increase since 1999, more than the number of people killed by gun homicides and vehicular crashes combined. A 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health estimated that 3.8 million Americans use opioids for nonmedical reasons every month.Lest you think that people seeking chemically induced highs are solely responsible for the problem, phy...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 4, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Back to basics about psychosocial factors in pain (i)
From time to time I see a flurry of tweets or Facebook posts about pain and psychosocial factors. Many of them are informative, intriguing and empathic, but some are just plain wrong. The ones I most get upset about are those arguing that because someone has “psychosocial factors” their pain must be psychological in origin, followed closely by the idea that psychosocial factors equate to psychopathology. This is a series of back to basics posts where I hope to set these things right. Pain, according to the current definition, is “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or po...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - September 3, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Pain Pain conditions Research Science in practice biopsychosocial Source Type: blogs

bend and ear and listen to my version / of a really solid Tennessee excursion
Ever since I moved to Atlanta (good God,nine years ago), people have been expressing, or at leastfeigning utter surprise, that I have never been to Chattanooga. " YOU'VE NEVER BEEN? " everyone always says, aghast, like I'm some kind of Abnormal, even though, GUESS WHAT, there are lots of places I haven't yet been, and Chattanooga hasn't really exactly numbered on my " must see before I die " list of travel destinations. But I wasn't opposed to the notion of visiting Chattanooga either (truth is I simply knew nothing about it apart from the Glenn Miller song), and so when we had a Labor Day weekend with ...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 3, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

A Role for Magnetism in the ED
​Children have this strange predilection for placing small objects in body cavities and orifices. Besides putting foreign bodies in their mouths, an act that often leads to ingestion or aspiration, the ear canals and nares are their favorite locations for depositing plastic beads, toy parts, paper materials, small vegetables, jewelry, screws, and nails, and that frequently brings them to the emergency department. Unsuccessful attempts to remove the foreign bodies in the ED lead to a consultation or referral to an ENT specialist. The timing, technique, and tools used to remove a foreign body will depend on the anatom...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - September 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Cutting down on opioids has made life miserable for chronic pain patients - Slate
On July 26, Todd Graham, 56, a well-respected rehabilitation specialist in Mishawaka, Indiana, lost his life. Earlier that day, a woman complaining of chronic pain had come to Graham's office in hope of receiving an opioid such as Percocet, Vicodin, or long-acting OxyContin. He reportedly told her that opioids were not an appropriate first-line treatment for long-term pain —a view now shared by professionals—and she, reportedly, accepted his opinion. Her husband, however, became irate. Later, he tracked down the doctor and shot him twice in the head.This horrific story has been showcased to confirm that phy...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 30, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Mastering Intensive Care 015 with Peter Brindley
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Peter Brindley  – Human factors including being a good person, listening well and tackling burnout (DasSMACC special episode) Whilst the skills of applying life support and resuscitation take up most of our training, they are relatively easier to master than the skills that allow us to become good at diagnosis, good at communication, and most of all good at being resilient over a whole career so we can satisfactorily work with others and deal with the str...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrew Davies Tags: Mastering Intensive Care Andrew Davies Burnout communication human factors peter brindley welfare Source Type: blogs

Memo To White Nationalists From A Geneticist: Why White Purity Is A Terrible Idea
On August 14th, UCLA researchers Aaron Panofsky and Joan Donovan presented findings of their study,  “When Genetics Challenges a Racist’s Identity: Genetic Ancestry Testing among White Nationalists,” at a sociology conference in Montreal. They’d analyzed 3,070 comments organized into 70 threads publicly posted to the (sometimes difficult to access) “social movement online community”  Stormfront.Former KKK Grand Wizard Don Black launched Stormfront on March 27, 1995. Posts exceed 12 million, ramping up since the 2016 election season. Panofsky and Donovan’s report has ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 29, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Genetics Health Care Ethics and Hate syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Conversation Placebo - The New York Times
In my daily work as a primary care internist, I see no letup from pain. Every single patient, it seems, has an aching shoulder or a bum knee or a painful back."Our bodies evolved to live about 40 years," I always explain,"and then be finished off by a mammoth or a microbe." Thanks to a century of staggering medical progress, we now live past 80, but evolution hasn't caught up; the cartilage in our joints still wears down in our 40s, and we are more obese and more sedentary than we used to be, which doesn't help.So it's no surprise that chronic arthritis and back pain are the second and third...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 29, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

15 tips for working with women
I work in a male-dominated field. As a cardiac anesthesiologist, I work with mostly male cardiac surgeons in a department where the majority of my fellow anesthesiologists are male. I work with some fantastic male colleagues. They are caring, skilled doctors, and I consider many of them to be friends. While most of them know how to handle emergencies, trauma and difficult work situations, many times they clam up when we talk about women’s issues. Since I have started to blog about women in medicine, some of these men hint at the topic. Recently I received a call from a fantastic male colleague of mine who practices a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 28, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sasha-k-shillcutt" rel="tag" > Sasha K. Shillcutt, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Primary Care Surgery Source Type: blogs

Ultravision Removes Smoke from Surgical Scene: Interview with Managing Director of Alesi Surgical
Smoke in a surgical field is a common problem, particularly during laparoscopic and robotic procedures, that arises from the use of electrosurgical instruments, lasers, and other devices. Typically, smoke is vented out through one of the instrument ports, too often with slow and imperfect results. Alesi Surgical, a company out of Cardiff, Wales, offers a technology that significantly improves on simple ventilation (see video at the bottom of this post). We spoke with Dominic Griffiths, PhD, Managing Director of Alesi Surgical, about how the company’s Ultravision technology works, how it was developed, and w...
Source: Medgadget - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Surgery Thoracic Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

Happy Birthday, BioBeat
This month, our blog that highlights NIGMS-funded research turns four years old! For each candle, we thought we’d illuminate an aspect of the blog to offer you, our reader, an insider’s view. Who are we? Over the years, the editorial team has included onsite science writers, office interns, staff scientists and guest authors from universities. Kathryn, who’s a regular contributor, writes entirely from her home office. Chris, who has a Ph.D. in neuroscience and now manages the blog, used to do research in a lab. Alisa has worked in NIGMS’ Bethesda-based office the longest: 22 years! She and I remembe...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - August 25, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Emily Carlson Tags: Being a Scientist Cell Biology Chemistry and Biochemistry Computers in Biology Cool Images Field Focus Genetics Pharmacology Physical Trauma and Sepsis Profiles Scientist Profiles Structural Biology Source Type: blogs

A New Brain Measure of Nociception in Infants | Pain Research Forum
Unlike adults, infants can't tell you if they're in pain. Instead, clinicians must interpret behaviors such as crying and physiological measures such as heart rate to determine what a newborn is experiencing. Since these can occur for reasons unrelated to nociception, the pain field has long sought more objective ways to measure pain in this nonverbal population. Now, in a new study, investigators have identified pain-related brain activity in infants that could be measured with a simple electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and used the activity to create an EEG template that allowed them to test the efficacy of an...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 24, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

3M ’s New Extended Wear Medical Tape
Long-term medical wearables are often limited by the adhesives that are used to stick them to the skin. The skin needs to breathe and glues can prevent that, remaining in the skin’s pores even after removal of a bandage or stick-on ECG electrode. The materials have to be biocompatible and non-irritating, as well as avoiding sensitizing the skin during prolonged use. 3M is now releasing a new product, the 4076 Extended Wear Medical Tape, that is designed for use with medical devices and suited for wear for up to two weeks. It’s meant to stick well even on sweaty individuals and to remain in place on moving parts...
Source: Medgadget - August 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Pediatrics Surgery Thoracic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Women are flocking to wellness because modern medicine still doesn ’t take them seriously - Quartz
The wellness movement is having a moment. The more luxurious aspects of it were on full display last weekend at the inaugural summitof Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle brand Goop, from crystal therapy to $66 jade eggs meant to be worn in the vagina. Meanwhile, juice cleanses,"clean eating," and hand-carved lamps made of pink Himalayan salthave all gone decidedly mainstream. I myself will cop to having participated in a sound bath —basically meditating for 90 minutes in a dark room while listening to gongs and singing bowls. (I felt amazingly weird afterward, in the best possible way.)It seems that privileged...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 20, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Knee pain – and central sensitisation
Conclusion People living with OA in their knees often spend many years having difficulty managing their pain before they are able to have surgery. From recent research in New Zealand, I don’t think many people are offered a pain “education” approach, and indeed, I’d bet there are a lot of people who don’t get referred for movement-based therapy either. Misunderstanding is rife in OA, with some people uncertain of the difference between osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and others very worried that they’re going to “wear the joint out” if they exercise. While OA isn&rsq...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - August 20, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Assessment Pain Pain conditions Research biopsychosocial Clinical reasoning disability function healthcare rehabilitation science treatment Source Type: blogs

How New Generation Drugs Are Targeting Depression
Two years ago, I talked with a prominent psychiatrist about what could be done for all the people who have treatment-resistant depression who do not respond — or only partially respond — to the drugs on the market today. “We wait for better drugs to come out,” he said. I wanted a better answer, because my experience with the newer drugs like Zyprexa (olanzapine) — atypical neuroleptics (a type of antipsychotic) that were supposed to treat bipolar disorder with fewer side effects than typical mood stabilizers like lithium and Depakote (divalproex sodium) — proved to be...
Source: World of Psychology - August 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Antidepressant Antipsychotic Depression Medications Treatment Depressive Episode Major Depressive Disorder Source Type: blogs

A commencement address to anesthesiologist assistants
A commencement address delivered on August 5, 2017, to the 2017 class of anesthesiologist assistants (AAs), Emory University. Distinguished faculty, graduates, honored guests: It is a great pleasure and an honor to be here, and to congratulate all the graduates of the Emory University Class of 2017 on your tremendous accomplishment. Just think about all you have learned in the past two years. You’ve transformed yourselves into real anesthesia professionals, able to deliver first-class care to patients at some of the most critical times in their lives. Today is a great time to become an anesthesiologist assistant. Jus...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 16, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/karen-s-sibert" rel="tag" > Karen S. Sibert, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

Breast Enhancement And Things You Must Know About It
Surgery for enhancing your breast is commonly referred to as a boob job. In fact in the cosmetic industry, this treatment has undeniably become the most in demand and famous treatment procedure, which several women are opting for. The enhancement or growth of your breasts again will depend on several factors. Always ensure that you get the surgery done through the hands of a reliable and knowledgeable breast surgeon Sydney. Your body type and overall profile will get assessed carefully. Only after this, the surgeon will decide about the surgery and how it should be preceded. Again, it is necessary for every candidate to m...
Source: Nurse Blogger - August 16, 2017 Category: Nursing Authors: Fabiola Panicucci Tags: Medical Services Source Type: blogs

Today, I hugged a stranger
. And I didn’t know his name. We had just operated on a young man, probably in his late teens.  He sustained multiple gunshot wounds to the chest and abdomen, and was in critical condition.  When he lost pulses in the trauma bay, we cut his chest open and spread his ribs.   His lifeless body laid there as we held his heart in the palm of our hands, and pumped it — over and over again — to mimic life.  We placed a clamp on his aorta to minimize blood loss, and to ensure that blood preferentially travels to the brain. We pumped his heart tirelessly, afraid to let go, afraid to give up, a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 14, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/edwin-acevedo" rel="tag" > Edwin Acevedo, Jr., MD < /a > Tags: Physician Cardiology Emergency Surgery Source Type: blogs

Knee pain – not just a simple case of osteoarthritis
Knee osteoarthritis is, like so many chronic pain problems, a bit of a weird one. While most of us learned that osteoarthritis is a fairly benign disease, one that we can’t do a whole lot about but one that plagues many of us, the disability associated with a painful knee is pretty high – and we still don’t have much of a clue about how the pain we experience is actually generated.  Cartilage doesn’t have nociceptive fibres, yet deterioration of cartilage is the hallmark of osteoarthritis, though there are other structures capable of producing nociceptive input around the knee joint. Perhaps, a...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - August 13, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Assessment Pain Pain conditions Research Science in practice biopsychosocial Chronic pain disability pain management rehabilitation treatment Source Type: blogs

Surgery Is One Hell Of A Placebo | FiveThirtyEight
The guy's desperate. The pain in his knee has made it impossible to play basketball or walk down stairs. In search of a cure, he makes a journey to a healing place, where he'll undergo a fasting rite, don ceremonial garb, ingest mind-altering substances and be anointed with liquids before a masked healer takes him through a physical ritual intended to vanquish his pain.Seen through different eyes, the process of modern surgery may look more more spiritual than scientific, said orthopedic surgeon Stuart Green, a professor at the University of California, Irvine. Our hypothetical patient is undergoing arthroscopic kn...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 13, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Surgeon General Nominee Hearings Underway
Surgeon General nominee Dr. Jerome Adams testified last week before Congress on his views on gun control and gun violence, the opioid crisis and other matters. Dr. Adams is an anesthesiologist by training. Dr. Jerome Adams The post Surgeon General Nominee Hearings Underway appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - August 12, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Lisa Marcucci Tags: People gun violence Jerome Adams Surgeon General Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound Controls Delivery of Local Anesthetic Just When and Where It Hurts
Localized pain caused by disease, injury, or surgery can be hard to control, and it leads too many people to use opioids. Though there are electronic and physical methods that can help manage some pain, these are typically only marginally effective and usually only work on targets close to the skin. Now a team from Boston Children’s Hospital has come up with a way to use ultrasound to trigger the release of an anesthetic previously injected into the affected region. The anesthetic is encapsulated within liposomes, tiny sacks made of lipids derived from cellular membranes. The walls of the liposomes are also seeded wi...
Source: Medgadget - August 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Nanomedicine Pain Management Surgery Source Type: blogs

This is what to remember in health reform: We are all one patient
As a physician, I am often discouraged when I turn on the news and read about the state of health care in our country. I can see all 397 sides of the debate and some truth in all sides. The enormous cost of medicine is overwhelming to comprehend for patients and families and even to those of us in medicine. I think it is important to know all that goes into the complex care of one patient. I am an anesthesiologist, but there is no way I could do my job without a large team. Each of us plays a role in the care of one patient. I am part of a team of people whose sole job every day is to care for you, our patient. I...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 7, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sasha-k-shillcutt" rel="tag" > Sasha K. Shillcutt, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Health reform Patients Surgery Source Type: blogs

Conversations about cannabis for chronic pain
The debate about cannabis and derivatives for persistent pain continues to grow in New Zealand, and elsewhere in the world. Many people I’ve treated and who are living with persistent pain say they like to use cannabis (in a variety of forms) to help with pain intensity and sleep, adding their voices to those wanting “medicinal” cannabis to be approved. In the few patients I’ve worked with who have managed to obtain a cannabis product (in NZ it has to be legally prescribed and will generally be in the form of Sativex or similar) the effect doesn’t seem as profound as the real thing (whether sm...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - August 6, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Chronic pain Therapeutic approaches Research Pain conditions Coping strategies Science in practice Health healthcare biopsychosocial pain management Source Type: blogs

Stopping Epidemics At The Source: Applying Lessons From Cholera To The Opioid Crisis
On September 8, 1854, acting on the advice of Dr. John Snow, London municipal authorities removed the pump handle from the Broad Street well in an effort to halt a major outbreak of cholera. Although an anesthesiologist by profession, Snow had methodically mapped the homes of new cases of cholera. He found that many clustered around the Broad Street pump. Snow’s findings, still regarded as a classic example of epidemiology, established the principle: “that the most important information to have about any communicable disease is its mode of communication.” Dr. Snow did not establish the biologic mechanism ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 4, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Chester Buckenmaier III and Eric Schoomaker Tags: Featured Public Health Quality Department of Veterans Affairs military health care Opioid Addiction opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs

Xavant ’s NMS 460 Peripheral Nerve Stimulator for Pain Relief Cleared by FDA
Xavant Technology, a company based in Pretoria, South Africa, won FDA clearance for its NMS 460 peripheral nerve stimulation system. The device is used to address chronic intractable pain, post-surgical pain, post-traumatic acute pain, and for pain control arising from rehab routines. The device delivers a hybrid pulsed radio frequency (PRF) waveform, developed by Xavant, through the skin via an accompanying stylus. The company claims that the resulting electromagnetic effects are similar to the ones that implanted neurostimulators generate, delivering some of the benefits of such devices without their ...
Source: Medgadget - August 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Pain Management Rehab Source Type: blogs

Almost half of all opioid misuse starts with a friend or family member's prescription | PBS NewsHour
More than half of adults who misused opioids did not have a prescription, and many obtained drugs for free from friends or relatives, according to a national survey of more than 50,000 adults.Although many people need medical narcotics for legitimate reasons, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported Monday that regular access to prescription opioids can facilitate misuse. The results, outlined in the Annals of Internal Medicine, indicate when the medical community overprescribes opioids, unused drugs are then available for abuse.More ...http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/opioid-misuse-starts-friend-family-membe...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 2, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

A physician ’s mixed feelings about clinical pathways
As the kids say, it’s complicated. Practicing physicians are seeing an ever increasing list of protocols and pathways coming their way. These arrive in several forms — order sets for medications, guidelines in how to proceed for various conditions, when to do this, when to do that, and when not to do either one. They generally are the product of various committees trying to synthesize what these days we call “best practices.” I have no doubt these aids are useful. They can focus the mind, streamline care and reduce medical costs. They also have the potential to improve care on average. Checklists, o...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 2, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christopher-johnson" rel="tag" > Christopher Johnson, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Intensive care Source Type: blogs

A medical student is diagnosed with cancer. Here is his story.
I began medical school, like many of my peers, with some experience working with patients. I worked as a volunteer EMT with Cornell University EMS for four years during my undergraduate years; shadowed a cardiologist and an anesthesiologist through Cornell’s Urban Summer program at NYP Hospital–Cornell and worked with patients during Global Medical Brigade trips to rural Honduras. All of this sparked my interest in medicine, but to claim I had any real understanding of a patient’s existential journey through serious disease would be an overstatement. That changed abruptly at the start of my first year at ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 2, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/ari-bernstein" rel="tag" > Ari Bernstein < /a > Tags: Conditions Cancer Medical school Source Type: blogs