Part One: Tapping the Wrist
​The wrist is not commonly aspirated in the emergency department, but emergent arthrocentesis may be indicated for extreme or concerning cases, and tapping the wrist to determine the underlying pathology or relieve pain may be of great value. The synovial fluid from the joint space can be analyzed for crystals, infection, and blood. This information may help determine the overall plan and aid in decision-making and consultation. The ultimate treatment plan may include admission, intravenous antibiotics, multiple aspirations, and even surgical washout.A swollen, painful wrist that is hot to the touch is concerning for sep...
Source: The Procedural Pause - April 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 16th 2020
We report a new class of natural-product-inspired covalent inhibitors of telomerase that target the catalytic active site. Age-Related Epigenetic Changes that Suppress Mitochondrial Function https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/age-related-epigenetic-changes-that-suppress-mitochondrial-function/ Today's open access research reports on two specific epigenetic changes observed in old individuals that act to reduce mitochondrial function. This joins an existing list of genes for which expression changes are known to impact mitochondrial function with age. A herd of hundreds of mitochondria are found ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 15, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Amyloid Plaques Containing Nucleic Acids Drive Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of protein aggregates in the brain. These are misfolded and altered versions of proteins that can act as seeds for solid deposits to form and spread in the brain. These deposits are surrounded by a halo of toxic biochemistry that harms and eventually kills neurons. Amyloid-β aggregates are present in the early stages of the condition, while tau aggregates cause much greater harm and cell death in the later stages. Alzheimer's disease is also an inflammatory condition, however, in which chronic inflammation and altered behavior of the central nervous system im...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 11, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

CHAD-STOP for cardiac amyloidosis
CHAD-STOP is the mnemonic for the initial steps in the management of cardiac amyloidosis: C: Conduction and rhythm disorder prevention H: High heart rate maintenance A: Anticoagulation D: Diuretics STOP: STOP beta receptor and calcium channel blockers, digoxin and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors Preload reserve is limited in cardiac amyloidosis due to severe diastolic dysfunction. Hence the only way to increase the cardiac output is by the heart rate reserve and hence it should not be cut down by beta blockade or calcium channel blockade. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors carry the risk of severe hypotens...
Source: Cardiophile MD - December 13, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 9th 2019
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 8, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Fibrosis as an Important Contributing Cause of Atrial Fibrillation
Researchers here argue that fibrosis of cardiac tissue is an important contribution to the development of atrial fibrillation in older patients. Fibrosis is a feature of many age-related conditions, a dysfunction in tissue maintenance processes that involves the generation of scar-like deposits of collagen by overactive fibroblasts. This scarring disrupts normal tissue structure and function in many organs, including the heart, and there is no good approved therapy to treat the progression of fibrosis: even slowing it is haphazard and unreliable. This may soon change. Fibrosis appears to be caused to a large degree ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 2nd 2019
In conclusion, T2D impairs vascular function by dysregulated autophagy. Therefore, autophagy could be a potential target for overcoming diabetic microvascular complications. To What Degree Does Loss of Skeletal Muscle with Age Contribute to Immunosenescence? https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/to-what-degree-does-loss-of-skeletal-muscle-with-age-contribute-to-immunosenescence/ Sarcopenia, the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, is characteristic of aging. A perhaps surprisingly large fraction of the losses can be averted by strength training, but there are nonetheless inexorable process...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 1, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cardiac Amyloid Buildup Correlates with Risk of Atrial Fibrillation
In this study, we sought to assess the prevalence of AF in patients with clinically undetected isolated cardiac amyloidosis (ICA) detected at autopsy and identify electrocardiographic (EKG) markers of such amyloid deposits. A total of 1083 patients were included in the study and 3.1% of patients were found to have asymptomatic ICA. Patients with ICA were older and had a higher odds of AF independent of age and CHA2DS2VASc score. Amongst patients with AF, those with ICA were more likely to have persistent forms of AF and had a lower sinus rhythm P-wave amplitude. Further studies are required to further define this entity, i...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 2nd 2019
In conclusion, in the absence of obesity, visceral adipose tissue possesses a pronounced anti-inflammatory phenotype during aging which is further enhanced by exercise. Methods of Inducing Cellular Damage are Rarely Relevant to Aging, and the Details Matter https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/08/methods-of-inducing-cellular-damage-are-rarely-relevant-to-aging-and-the-details-matter/ One of the major challenges in aging research is determining whether or not models of cellular or organismal damage and its consequences are in any way relevant to the natural processes of aging. One can hit a brick with...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 1, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Lipid Accumulation in Microglia Contributes to Neuroinflammation and Neurodegeneration
Researchers have found that microglia in the aging brain have a tendency to accumulate lipids, and that those that do are harmful. This is a fascinating discovery, given that microglia are essentially the central nervous system version of macrophages elsewhere in the body, and lipid accumulation in macrophages leading to senescence and inflammatory behavior is an important mechanism in atherosclerosis. Further, it is well established that microglia in the brain become inflammatory, senescent, and dysfunctional in later life, and this behavior contributes to the progression of neurodegenerative conditions. It has been demon...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 15th 2019
In conclusion, we show here that sEVs are responsible for mediating paracrine senescence and speculate that they could be involved in inducing bystander senescence during therapy-induced senescence or aging. In fact, when compared to soluble factors, sEVs have different biophysical and biochemical properties as they have a longer lifespan than do soluble factors and they are more resistant to protease degradation. The idea that blocking sEV secretion could be a potential therapeutic approach to alleviate senescence "spreading" during chemotherapy-induced senescence or in aging tissues presents itself as a very at...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Question of a Limit to Human Life Span
In this study we re-examine both claims with more recent and reliable data on supercentenarians (persons aged 110 years and over). We found that despite a dramatic historical increase in the number of supercentenarians, further growth of human longevity records in subsequent birth cohorts slowed down significantly and almost stopped for those born after 1879. We also found an exponential acceleration of age-specific death rates for persons older than 113 years in more recent data. Slowing down the historical progress in maximum reported age at death and accelerated growth of age-specific death rates after age 113 ye...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 12, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 3rd 2019
In conclusion, there is solid evidence that obesity deregulates cellular mechanisms related to nutrient sensing. Altered Intercellular Communication It is accepted that aging impacts the organism at the cellular level, but also decreases the capacity of cells of an organism to interact. During aging, there is a decreased communication at the neuronal, neuroendocrine, and endocrine levels. Two of the most compelling examples of impaired communication are inflammaging and immunosenescence. The inflammaging phenotype results in elevated cytokines. These cytokines can accelerate and propagate the aging process. T...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 2, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Decreased Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow is Associated with Cognitive Decline
Many neurodegenerative conditions are associated with the accumulation of forms of metabolic waste in the central nervous system, protein aggregates that form solid deposits between or within cells. Tauopathies such as frontotemporal dementia are associated with tau aggregates, synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease with α-synuclein, and amyloidoses with varying forms of amyloid, such as the amyloid-β found in elevated amounts in Alzheimer's disease patients. Alzheimer's itself is an amyloidosis that also becomes a tauopathy in its later stages. These protein aggregates and their surrounding halos of harm...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 13th 2019
In this study, a significant (30%) increase in maximum lifespan of mice was found after nonablative transplantation of 100 million nucleated bone marrow (BM) cells from young donors, initiated at the age that is equivalent to 75 years for humans. Moreover, rejuvenation was accompanied by a high degree of BM chimerism for the nonablative approach. Six months after the transplantation, 28% of recipients' BM cells were of donor origin. The relatively high chimerism efficiency that we found is most likely due to the advanced age of our recipients having a depleted BM pool. In addition to the higher incorporation rates, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 12, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Amyloid- β Aggregation Accelerates Age-Related Activation of Microglia
This open access paper is illustrative of present work on the role of microglial dysfunction and chronic inflammation in Alzheimer's disease. The central nervous system immune cells called microglia become inappropriately inflammatory with age. A new consensus on Alzheimer's disease is that initial amyloid-β accumulation causes far greater than usual chronic disarray and inflammatory signaling in the supporting cells of the brain, such as microglia, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. This in turn leads to the much more damaging tau aggregation and consequent damage and death of neurons. Alzheimer's disease (AD...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 7, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 29th 2019
In this study, we report the age-associated differences between fetal MSC (fMSC) populations and MSCs isolated from elderly donors with respect to their transcriptomes. We successfully reprogrammed fMSCs (55 days post conception) and adult MSC (aMSC; 60-74 years) to iPSCs and, subsequently, generated the corresponding iMSCs. In addition, iMSCs were also derived from ESCs. The iMSCs were similar although not identical to primary MSCs. We unraveled a putative rejuvenation and aging gene expression signature. We show that iMSCs irrespective of donor age and cell type re-acquired a similar secretome to that of th...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Amyloid- β is not Merely Molecular Waste
Alzheimer's disease begins with the accumulation of amyloid-β in the brain, but this doesn't mean that amyloid-β is purely molecular waste. Yes, it is harmful given the presence of too much of it in the central nervous system, but that is true of most of our biochemistry. There is good evidence for amyloid-β to act as an antimicrobial system, for example, which is the basis for considering persistent infection as a potential contributing cause of Alzheimer's disease, in which infectious agents drive the generation of ever increasing amounts of amyloid-β. Even setting aside that and other evidence, howev...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Sudbury Is Still Waiting...
Bill Crumplin, with photo of his late wife Donna Williams, image courtesy Sudbury.comYou might recall mypost of a few years ago about Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, a medium-sized town that turned to its citizens to fund a PET/CT facility when the much-touted Health Service would not provide it. The wait-time was not just an inconvenience; the health of Sudbury citizens was adversely affected by the lack of local scanning capability.The wait goes on, it seems.My friend Stacey discoveredanother such tragedy related to imaging, or rather, lack thereof. As reported onSudbury.com:Donna Williams ’ dying wish was to raise money...
Source: Dalai's PACS Blog - April 4, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 1st 2019
In conclusion, long-term aerobic exercise appears to attenuate the decline in endothelial vascular function, a benefit which is maintained during chronological aging. However, currently there is not enough evidence to suggest that exercise interventions improve vascular function in previously sedentary healthy older adults. Hijacking the Proteasome to Dispose of Unwanted Molecules in Age-Related Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/hijacking-the-proteasome-to-dispose-of-unwanted-molecules-in-age-related-disease/ Cells are equipped with a protein disposal system in the form of the proteaso...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 31, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Does Klotho Act on Cognitive Function via FGF23?
Klotho is a longevity gene in that more of the protein it codes for acts to modestly extend life in mice. Levels of klotho protein decline with age, and increased amounts appear to produce beneficial outcomes in health and longevity in part via stem cell function. Klotho also influences cognition, and a number of research groups are working on approaches, such as gene therapies to upregulate klotho expression, or delivery of recombinant protein fragments of the full klotho molecule, that might at some point result in ways to enhance cognitive function in humans, old and young alike. Klotho is known to be closely rel...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Phase II Clinical Trial Results for the Eidos Therapeutics Approach to Transthyretin Amyloidosis
This study represents the first clinical experience with AG10 in the target patient population of transthyretin amyloidosis cardiomyopathy (ATTR-CM). Administration of AG10 was well tolerated and was not associated with safety signals of potential clinical concern. In the present study AG10 treatment increased serum TTR levels from baseline and brought those levels to within the normal range in all subjects, both mutant and wild-type. This included subjects whose baseline levels were markedly below the normal range. The 28-day treatment duration of the present study limits any assessment of clinical benefit. The ser...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 11th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Blame Tau for Much of the Harm Caused by Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy
Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, as the name might suggest, is an amyloidosis. It involves the build up of amyloid-β, and in some cases significant amounts of other forms of amyloid, in blood vessel walls in the brain, and dysfunction results. As the brain is a nutrient-hungry organ, any disruption of the blood supply will cause issues over the long term, contributing to the development of dementia. As most readers here no doubt know, amyloid-β deposits are the primary feature of early Alzheimer's disease, at the stages leading into mild cognitive impairment. Amyloid deposition and the changes in cellular biochemistr...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 7, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

RAGE Knockout Reduces Age-Related Kidney Damage in Mice
RAGE is the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), the mechanism by which cells react to the presence of AGEs. AGEs are metabolic byproducts that are both created in the body and present in the diet; cooking animal fat produces AGEs, for example. Diets heavy in meat and the related, fun, unhealthy products so prevalent in this modern calorie-packed world of ours are also heavy in AGEs of various sorts. It remains a topic for discussion as to the degree to which dietary AGEs are a problem, however. Do they contribute significantly to the issues caused by AGEs in general, or only in conditions in which metaboli...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 22nd 2018
In this report, we propose that the molecular mechanisms of beneficial actions of CR should be classified and discussed according to whether they operate under rich or insufficient energy resource conditions. Future studies of the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial actions of CR should also consider the extent to which the signals/factors involved contribute to the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and other CR actions in each tissue or organ, and thereby lead to anti-aging and prolongevity. RNA Interference of ATP Synthase Subunits Slows Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 21, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Anti-Amyloid CPHPC Therapy Used in a Clinical Trial for Alzheimer's Disease
CPHPC, now called miridesap, is a cautionary tale of what all too often happens to promising approaches in the field of medical development, once they advance to the point of expensive clinical trials and the requirement for partners with deep pockets to fund those trials. Miridesap was one of the earlier methodologies demonstrated to clear out transthyretin amyloid from tissues. This form of amyloid appears to be an important contribution to risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as a factor in osteoarthritis, and the evidence suggests it is the majority cause of death in supercentenarians. Its accumulation in old tissue...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 3rd 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 2, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

First Generation Pharmaceutical Treatments for Transthyretin Amyloidosis Continue to Make Progress
Perhaps a score of the countless proteins in the human body misfold in large amounts in later life. The misfolded form is insoluble, leading to solid deposits of the protein in and around cells. These problem proteins are known as amyloids, and the accumulation of amyloids is one of the root causes of aging. Amyloidosis conditions arise from the presence of amyloid and the disruptive effect it has on cellular biochemistry. The best known form of amyloid is the amyloid-β thought to cause Alzheimer's disease, but the research community is beginning to appreciate that other forms may be just as big a problem over the cou...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 28, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 23rd 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Evidence for Herpesvirus Infection to be a Significant Cause of Alzheimer's Disease
A few recent papers have, collectively, added evidence for persistent viral infection to be a significant contributing cause of Alzheimer's disease. A number of viruses in the herpesvirus family are prevalent in the population but cause few obvious symptoms, such as HSV-1 and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Some of these, particularly CMV, are already under suspicion as being the cause of long-term dysfunction in the immune system. Viral infection is an attractive way to explain why only some of the people who exhibit all of the known risk factors for Alzheimer's disease actually go on to develop the full clinical manifestation of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 4th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 3, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

When I am Eighty-Five
I will be 85 somewhere in the mid 2050s. It seems like a mirage, an impossible thing, but the future eventually arrives regardless of whatever you or I might think about it. We all have a vision of what it is to be 85 today, informed by our interactions with elder family members, if nothing else. People at that age are greatly impacted by aging. They falter, their minds are often slowed. They are physically weak, in need of aid. Perhaps that is why we find it hard to put ourselves into that position; it isn't a pleasant topic to think about. Four decades out into the future may as well be a science fiction novel, a far awa...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 29, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 16th 2018
This study demonstrates that small peptide domains derived from native protein amelogenin can be utilized to construct a mineral layer on damaged human enamel in vitro. Six groups were prepared to carry out remineralization on artificially created lesions on enamel: (1) no treatment, (2) Ca2+ and PO43- only, (3) 1100 ppm fluoride (F), (4) 20 000 ppm F, (5) 1100 ppm F and peptide, and (6) peptide alone. While the 1100 ppm F sample (indicative of common F content of toothpaste for homecare) did not deliver F to the thinly deposited mineral layer, high F test sample (indicative of clinical varnish treatment) formed mainly C...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 15, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Vast Funding is Available for the Later Stages of Development of any Credible Therapy that Addresses a Cause of Aging
Today I'll point out a couple of recent news items that illustrate there is no funding drought for any group that manages to bring a credible approach to addressing one of the causes of aging to the point of human clinical trials. This is the case even when it is generally understood by all involved that the therapies in question are first generation attempts at implementation, subject to all the normal challenges that brings, and in principle not as good as competing forms of technology that are still at an earlier stage in the process of development. The drought lies in the number of groups who can make it to this stage,...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 9, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Investment Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 2nd 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Short Report from the Undoing Aging Conference
The LongLongLife team here reports briefly on their time at the recent Undoing Aging conference. This was the first in a series of conferences, hosted jointly by the SENS Research Foundation and Forever Healthy Foundation, that will mix the scientific and academic focus of the SENS rejuvenation research conferences with the biotechnology industry focus of the Rejuvenation Biotechnology conferences. By all accounts the initial Undoing Aging event was well received. The very first Undoing Aging Congress was held in March 2018 in Berlin, and was attended by 350 people from a total of 36 countries. Initiated by Aubrey...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 26, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Tau and α-synuclein act in Synergy to Produce Neurodegeneration
The three most harmful forms of metabolic waste in the aging brain are amyloid-β, hyperphosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein, all of which precipitate into solid deposits with a complex halo of surrounding biochemistry that damages and ultimately kills cells. They contribute to various age-related neurodegenerative conditions that are classified as amyloidosis, tauopathy, and synucleinopathy, respectively. Looking at just one of these forms of waste in isolation misses the real story, however. An aging brain has some of each, and it is apparent from the study of Alzheimer's disease that amyloid-β and tau inte...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Specific Risk Factors can Appear to Decline in Importance in Later Life, as the High-Risk Individuals are Already Dead
As this 40-year longitudinal study illustrates, when measuring the correlation between specific risk factors on specific forms of mortality, their influence can appear to decline in later life. That is to say that mortality rates keep rising with advancing age, but they are less obviously influenced by any one cause for a given cohort of individuals. This effect occurs because the fatal consequences of a particular form of age-related dysfunction will tend to occur earlier in old age for individuals with the highest risk. With each passing year, a given age group is ever more made up of resilient survivors, people who - fo...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 9, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 8th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 7, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

ALZFORUM Looks Back at 2017 in Alzheimer's Research
ALZFORUM should be on your reading list if you have more than a passing interest in research into neurodegenerative conditions. It is a great example of what can be achieved in educational advocacy if any earnest institutional funding is devoted to the task. That investment in advocacy exists today because Alzheimer's disease research is by far the largest portion of the broader aging research community, measured by funding and volume of projects, and has been for some time. The situation is quite different for our area of interest, rejuvenation research to repair the causes of aging. Here, the scientific programs of our c...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 2, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP): MRI
Discussionby Dr MGK Murthy, Dr GA PrasadChronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is characterized clinically by a progressive or relapsing course of many months to years of symptoms similar to compressive myelopathy.Etiology Remains unknown, but T-cell activation in nerves plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CIDP& antigens in Schwann cells have been identified.PathologicallyCIDP is characterized by mononuclear cell infiltrates, edema, segmental demyelination, and remyelination&“onion bulb formation” which describes enlarged fascicles with increased endoneural conn...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - December 12, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Study: 46.7 million Americans have Alzheimer ’s Disease brain pathology today, so it’s urgent to prevent or at least delay progression to clinical disease
Discussion: Because large numbers of persons are living with preclinical AD, our results underscore the need for secondary preventions for persons with existing AD brain pathology who are likely to develop clinical disease during their lifetimes as well as primary preventions for persons without preclinical disease. The Study in Context Bill Gates announces $50 million investment to fight Alzheimer’s Disease From Anti-Alzheimer’s ‘Magic Bullets’ to True Brain Health Solving the Brain Fitness Puzzle Is the Key to Self-Empowered Aging 10 million people develop dementia every year Report: 35% of...
Source: SharpBrains - December 11, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Alzheimers-disease amyloidosis biomarkers Forecast Intervention neurodegeneration prediction Prevalence prevention Statistics Source Type: blogs

Covalent Bioscience is One of the Current Crop of SENS Rejuvenation Biotechnology Startup Companies
Covalent Bioscience is the company formed to carry forward work on catalytic antibodies capable of clearing aggregated proteins found in old tissues, such as transthyretin amyloid. This type of amyloid, a misfolded protein that disrupts normal tissue function when present in large enough amounts, is associated with cardiovascular mortality and osteoarthritis, and is thought to be a prevalent cause of death in supercentenarians. The advantage of catalytic antibodies over normal antibodies is that they bind to the target site on a protein, then destroy that site, then move on. One antibody can attack thousands of targets, ma...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 8, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 27th 2017
We examined associations between mortality and accelerometer-measured PA using age-relevant intensity cutpoints in older women of various ethnicities. The results support the hypothesis that higher levels of accelerometer-measured PA, even when below the moderate-intensity threshold recommended in current guidelines, are associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality in women aged 63 to 99. Our findings expand on previous studies showing that higher self-reported PA reduces mortality in adults aged 60 and older, specifically in older women, and at less than recommended amounts. Moreover, our findings challenge th...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 26, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Most Obvious Tau Aggregates in Tauopathies, the Neurofibrillary Tangles, are not the Primary Cause of Harm
Altered proteins build up in the aging brain, forming solid deposits. The most prominent of them are amyloid-β, altered forms of tau, and α-synuclein, giving rise to amyloidosis, tauopathies, and synucleinopathies respectively. Some conditions mix and match: Alzheimer's disease is both an amyloidosis and a tauopathy. To further muddy the waters, any aging brain far enough along in the process to exhibit full-blown neurodegeneration will also exhibit significant levels of all of the other forms of dysfunction caused by aging. Present thinking on the roots of protein aggregation conditions is fairly diverse...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 22, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 13th 2017
In conclusion, we have developed an effective PILs strategy to deliver the AUF1 plasmid to a specific target, and this system may be useful for the development of new anti-aging drugs. Considering the Evidence for Vascular Amyloidosis as a Cause of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/11/considering-the-evidence-for-vascular-amyloidosis-as-a-cause-of-aging/ The balance of evidence for the aging of the cardiovascular system suggests the following view. It starts off in the blood vessels, with the accumulation of senescent cells and cross-links. Cross-links directly stiffen these tissues, while ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Considering the Evidence for Vascular Amyloidosis as a Cause of Aging
The balance of evidence for the aging of the cardiovascular system suggests the following view. It starts off in the blood vessels, with the accumulation of senescent cells and cross-links. Cross-links directly stiffen these tissues, while senescent cells produce inflammation and changes in cell behavior that promote calcification - again leading to stiffness. These and other processes also disrupt the delicate balance of cell signaling responsible for blood vessel constriction and relaxation. All of this combines to degrade the feedback system controlling pressure in the cardiovascular system, and blood pressure rises as ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 6, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 2nd 2017
This study featured two independent experiments. The first established the safety of administering a therapeutic gene delivery vector, BNP116, created from an inactivated virus over three months, into 48 pigs without heart failure through the coronary arteries via catheterization using echocardiography. The second experiment examined the efficacy of the treatment in 13 pigs with severe heart failure induced by mitral regurgitation. Six pigs received the gene and 7 received a saline solution. The researchers determined that the gene therapy was safe and significantly reversed heart failure by 25 percent in the left v...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 1, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Additional Evidence for Transthyretin Amyloid to Contribute to Osteoarthritis
The objective of this study was to investigate the role of TTR in vivo in mice transgenic for 90-100 copies of the wild-type human TTR (hTTR-TG mice) using an experimental OA and aging model. We used mice with transgenic overexpression of human rather than mouse TTR as the mouse protein is kinetically several orders of magnitude more stable than the human protein and hence is not subject to amyloid formation, which depends on tetramer dissociation. The hTTR-TG mouse strain that we have studied showed human TTR deposits between 12 and 17 months of age in the kidneys and heart. In mice over 18 months of age, TTR-relat...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 30, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs