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Amebiasis (Entamoeba histolytica Infection)
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - September 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

TECHLAB(R) Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance To Market E. HISTOLYTICA QUIK CHEK(TM) To Aid Clinicians In The Diagnosis Of Amebiasis Caused By The E. Histolytica Parasite
E. HISTOLYTICA QUIK CHEK™ and GIARDIA/CRYPTOSPORIDIUM QUIK CHEK™ Provide a definitive diagnosis in parasite screening BLACKSBURG, Va., June 13, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- TECHLAB,® Inc., a leading developer and manufacturer o... Diagnostics, FDA TECHLAB, E. HISTOLYTICA QUIK CHEK, Amebiasis, E. Histolytica (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - June 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Teaching an old drug new tricks to fight cytomegalovirus
An old drug once mostly used to treat amebiasis -- a disease caused by a parasite -- and induce vomiting in cases of poisoning appears to also halt replication of cytomegalovirus (CMV), a herpesvirus that can cause serious disease in immunocompromised individuals, including those with HIV or organ transplant recipients, report researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Teaching an old drug new tricks to fight cytomegalovirus
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that an old drug once mostly used to treat amebiasis -- a disease caused by a parasite -- and induce vomiting in cases of poisoning appears to also halt replication of cytomegalovirus (CMV), a herpesvirus that can cause serious disease in immunocompromised individuals, including those with HIV or organ transplant recipients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Having and Fighting Ebola: Public Health Lessons From a Clinician Turned Patient
While treating patients with Ebola in Guinea, I kept a journal to record my perceived level of risk of being infected with the deadly virus. A friend who'd volunteered previously had told me that such a journal comforted him when he looked back and saw no serious breach of protocol or significant exposure. On a spreadsheet delineating three levels of risk -- minimal, moderate, and high -- I'd been able to check off minimal risk every day after caring for patients. Yet on October 23, 2014, I entered Bellevue Hospital as New York City's first Ebola patient. Though I didn't know it then -- I had no television and was too wea...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news