How to Be Happier at Work
You're reading How to Be Happier at Work, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Let’s face it - work isn’t always fun and games. Between stress, deadlines and occasional long hours, your job can start to feel more dreadful than enjoyable, and more meaningless than fulfilling. However, as working takes up so much of our lives – for Americans roughly 1,700 hours per year – feeling happy and less stressed at work is important. The negativity that you have at work can begin to affect other a...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: kateowilson Tags: career featured happiness happiness at work work life balance workplace Source Type: blogs

How Do I Detox From Benzodiazepines?
Detox from Benzodiazepines Benzodiazepines are highly addictive medications. They are used to help treat anxiety, sleep issues, and even seizures. They work to calm the body and can be a great, helpful tool for many people when used as prescribed. There are many different types of Benzodiazepines, as they differ in strength and onset time. Some Benzodiazepines, such as Librium, is used to help treat symptoms associated with alcohol withdrawal. Detox from Benzodiazepines can be difficult, but it is possible. The names that people know most commonly know Benzodiazepines as include: Xanax Valium Ativan Klonopin They are onl...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - April 27, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Substance Abuse benzo benzodiazepines medical detox Source Type: blogs

The problems with Benzodiazapine drugs.
Xanax is a benzodiazepine drug. There are many others. While we are focused on the opioid epidemic, the abuse of benzos is growing in the U.S. as well. I see many clients who have been prescribed a benzo for anxiety. It is very easy to develop a tolerance, become addicted, and then have worst symptoms than the ones being treated to begin with during withdrawal. (Source: Markham's Behavioral Health)
Source: Markham's Behavioral Health - March 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David G. Markham Source Type: blogs

In Recovery? Ask Yourself These Questions Before Moving to a New City
Moving might be the right choice, but examine your motives. When we were drinking and using, we were irrational, impulsive, and at the whim of our heartbreakingly horrible decisions. We get into recovery to be more than that. The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. – Lao Tzu Wherever you go, there you are. – Unknown We’ve all heard or tried the myth of the geographic cure: that we can change the unmanageability of our addictions simply by changing locations. The program suggests waiting a year to make major changes in our lives, such as moving to a new place or getting divorced. That s...
Source: World of Psychology - March 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Addiction Personal Publishers Recovery The Fix Moving Relocation Sobriety Source Type: blogs

A Xanax prescription that should have been rejected
In hindsight, I should have never accepted a Xanax prescription from my doctor. What followed was catastrophic — rapidly developing tolerance and physical dependence on the drug and a prolonged illness. Three-and-a-half years later, I am still slowly tapering off Valium (having transitioned to a longer-acting benzodiazepine to aid in tapering) and experiencing debilitating symptoms […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 28, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christy-huff" rel="tag" > Christy Huff, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Meds Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Will US Drug Policymakers Blow It Again —This Time With Benzodiazepines?
In a recent  column, Maia Szalavitz reports on the rise in overdose deaths related to benzodiazepines (a class of tranquilizers including Xanax, Valium, and Ativan). According to a recent  study in JAMA, the number benzodiazepine prescriptions doubled in the US   from 2003 to 2015. And benzodiazepines are found in the bloodstream of almost a third of all opioid overdose victims—a nearly ten-fold increase since the beginning of this century. Szalavitz reminds us that the US is not the only developed country with an overdose problem from the nonmedical use of prescription drugs: ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 14, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Benzodiazepines and Addiction
What is a Benzodiazepine? Benzodiazepines are a prescription drug sedative used to treat a variety of conditions. They are classified as Schedule IV in the Controlled Substances Act. Some of the conditions that Benzodiazepine can treat include: Insomnia Anxiety Seizures Muscle tension Panic disorders When used as prescribed under the supervision of a medical professional, Benzodiazepines can be very useful in the treatment of these disorders. Many people are able to live healthy, happy lives while taking Benzodiazepines to curb the symptoms of their various conditions. However, because of the addictive nature of Benzodia...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 31, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Uncategorized benzo benzodiazepines prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription pills Source Type: blogs

Heroin Addiction Explained: How Opioids Hijack the Brain - The New York Times
THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC is devastating America. Overdoses have passed car crashes and gun violence to become the leading cause of death for Americans under 55. The epidemic has killed more people than H.I.V. at the peak of that disease, and its death toll exceeds those of the wars in Vietnam and Iraq combined. Funerals for young people have become common. Every 11 minutes, another life is lost.So why do so many people start using these drugs? Why don't they stop?Some people are more susceptible to addiction than others. But nobody is immune. For many, opioids like heroin entice by bestowing an immediate sense of...
Source: Psychology of Pain - December 20, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

We Seem To Have News Thick And Fast On Prescription Monitoring.
First we have:DORA the ignorer: Prescription-tracking system failing to monitor all high-risk addictive drugs Diazepam, quetiapine and fluoxetine contributed to ex-Navy submariner's death, says coronerAntony Scholefield2nd October 2018A coroner has stressed the need for real-time script-tracking software to cover addictive schedule 4 drugs such as diazepam and quetiapine, not just opioids.The Tasmanian coroner made the comments after investigating the 2014 death of 44-year-old ex-Navy submariner Michael Allan Steer, who died from a toxic combination of prescription medication.Toxicology analysis revealed the presence of di...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - October 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Can I Become Addicted to My Anxiety Medication?
What is Anxiety? Having anxiety is a difficult issue suffered by millions. It is much more than just butterflies in your stomach before going on stage or before an important event – it can be crippling and can cause severe impacts on one’s life, and you may need to be on anxiety medication to help with the symptoms. According to anxiety.org, there are many anxiety-related disorders, and they are divided into three main categories: Anxiety disorders Obsessive-compulsive and related disorders Trauma and stressor-related disorders Anxiety disorders are characterized by a general feature of excessive fear (i.e. e...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - October 8, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Anxiety Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment PTSD anxiety medication benzodiazepines Source Type: blogs

Is Addiction Hereditary?
Looking at Your Family History It can be widely speculated that addiction can be hereditary. If there are addicts in your family, it could be possible that their behaviors can be passed on to you, as well. When considering this, it is important to look at your family history, especially your parent’s. Numerous studies show the cause of addiction can be broken down to 50 percent genetic and 50 percent issues with coping skills. Further studies have shown that children of addicts are up to 8 times more likely to also develop an addiction. One study in particular took 231 individuals who had been clinically diagnosed wi...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - September 20, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Alcohol Alcoholism Depression Depression Treatment Drinking Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eating Disorder Treatment Mental Health family family disease hereditary Source Type: blogs

Anxiety and Addiction
Anxiety and Anxiety Disorders Anxiety is a complex condition that affects millions of people all over the world. It is a broad term in itself and can look different on everybody. It is literally defined as: “a nervous disorder characterized by a state of excessive uneasiness and apprehension, typically with compulsive behavior or panic attacks.” Often times, anxiety and addiction can also go hand-in-hand. Much like anxiety, panic attacks can be completely different for everybody who experiences them. You may experience all symptoms, or only some. Some symptoms of anxiety and panic attacks may include: Rapid he...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - September 11, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Anxiety Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eating Disorder Treatment Source Type: blogs

Depression: Common medication side effect?
This study is especially thought-provoking, given that more and more people are taking medications with depression or suicidal thoughts as possible side effects. The CDC just released updated data showing a troubling recent rise in suicide rates, and that 54% of those who die from suicide do not have a known mental health disorder, so this is an important public health issue. That said, it is important to note: in this study, people who used these medications were more likely to be widowed and have chronic health problems, both of which are associated with a higher risk of depression. And many (but not all) of these medica...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Anxiety and Depression Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs

A pediatrician ’s healing spirit: treating depressed, anxious, and suicidal teens
I had not one, but two suicidal teen patients today. This is only one day after I had an eight-year-old suicidal patient come to see me. Three weeks ago, a 17-year-old female walked in, she had hung herself in her closet one month earlier — saved only by the timely breaking of the crossbar of her closet — passed out on the closet floor by her mother. A 16-year-old male coming in for a routine physical examination confided that earlier in the year, he had slept for over 36 hours after ingesting a bag of his friend’s mother’s Xanax in an attempt to take his life. Ten years ago, teen depression, struck...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/uchenna-umeh" rel="tag" > Uchenna Umeh, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

I Guess This Means The Federal Government Is Moving Forward With RTPM.
This popped up last week:Health to build national data exchange for prescription trackingBy Justin Hendry on Jun 21, 2018 6:54AM For real-time monitoring system.The Department of Health will establish a national data exchange for transferring prescription information between states and territories in real-time.The exchange is the first piece of work for the national prescription monitoring system, which was funded with $16.4 million last year to target the misuse of certain prescription drugs.The system will be used to instantly alert pharmacists and doctors if a patient has previously been supplied with prescription-only ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - June 26, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Might Depression Be Linked to One of These Popular Medications?
If you’re taking beta blockers, certain kinds of anxiety drugs, certain types of painkillers (including ibuprofen), proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (used to treat acid reflux), ACE inhibitors (used to treat high blood pressure), or anti-convulsant drugs, you may be at greater risk for depression. That’s according to a new, large-scale study published earlier this week in JAMA. However, this was a correlational study, so it can’t say that these medications actually cause depression or not. It may be that people with greater health problems are more likely to take one of these medications and be depressed abo...
Source: World of Psychology - June 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression General Medications Psychiatry Research Drugs cause depression popular medications Source Type: blogs

BBC - Future - Pain bias: The health inequality rarely discussed
In 2009, my doctor told me that, like"a lot of women", I was paying too much attention to my body. Saying there wasn't an issue, he suggested I just relax and try to ignore the symptoms.The decision seemed to run counter to what my records showed. A few weeks earlier, I had ended up in the emergency room with chest pains and a heart rate hitting 220 beats per minute. The ER crew told me it was a panic attack, gave me Xanax and told me to try to sleep.I'd had panic attacks before. I knew this episode was not one. So I went to my doctor.He put me on a heart monitor overnight. Bingo: I had another episode, t...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 31, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Internet support forums for benzodiazepine withdrawal: the good, the bad, and the ugly
Since the advent of the internet and rise of social media, patients can connect and compare their experiences with prescribed drug withdrawal. A problem that was once considered rare is a worldwide epidemic that is finally getting noticed.  A recent New York Times article discussed the problems many have discontinuing antidepressants, and more than 8,800 readers responded about their difficulty stopping these drugs. Another recent article discussed the role of online communities in supporting patients withdrawing from prescribed drugs. This led me to reflect on my observations as both a doctor and patient navigating o...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christy-huff" rel="tag" > Christy Huff, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Medications Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Stop Stigmatizing Psychiatric Treatment!
Stigma is a sticky, two-sided issue, one that we talk about often in our field of psychiatry.  Many things are stigmatized. While mental illness is an obvious one --and I'll come back to this-- many other things are stigmatized as well.  To name just a few: drug use, smoking, being a criminal, going to jail, behaving in a disruptive way, smelling badly and being physically unkempt in certain settings, begging for money in public, being on public assistance (in certain circles), beating your children (again, in certain circles), incest (in all cultures), being morbidly obese (especially when it happens in someone ...
Source: Shrink Rap - April 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Rappers: Stop glamorizing prescription drug use
During his 2004 stand up “Never Scared,” Chris Rock said, “I love rap music, but I am tired of defending it.” That statement, for me, holds true more today than ever before. Mumbling about nonsense is already hard to defend and only gets worse when the first line to every song these days has a reference to drugs. Drugs, sex, and money have always been an important part of music, and it never really bothered me — until I became a physician and continuously witnessed drug overdoses in teens and young adults leading to their death. Rappers have now made it “cool” to take prescription ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/hassan-patail" rel="tag" > Hassan Patail, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

Why Can ’t I Shut Off My Mind?
Beth came to therapy because she could not stop her mind from worrying. She’d think about the same things over and over, get stuck in a thought with no solutions loop. She’d wake up obsessing about her future and blaming herself for past mistakes. Intellectually she knew she just had to do her best and take everything a day at a time. But she could not quiet her mind. Ruminating, as defined by Webster’s Medical Dictionary, is “obsessive thinking about an idea, situation, or choice especially when it interferes with normal mental functioning; specifically: a focusing of one’s attention on negat...
Source: World of Psychology - January 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hilary Jacobs Hendel, LCSW Tags: Anxiety and Panic Fear Obsession OCD Worry Source Type: blogs

Thync Relax Pro: A Medgadget Review
Conclusion While the Thync Relax Pro might have shown a glimmer of hope in actually calming us down, its frustrating design quirks ultimately made us feel anything but relaxed. Thync will need to go back to the drawing board and redesign the device if it hopes to make its bioelectronic therapy successful with consumers. More information and a link to purchase a Thync Relax Pro: Thync website… Flashback: Medgadget @ CES 2015: Thync Mood Stimulating Wearable… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - November 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Exclusive Neurology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Top 25 Psychiatric Medications for 2016
Most people understand that the role of psychiatric medications is to help alleviate the symptoms associated with different types of mental disorders, such as depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia, anxiety, and more. Psychiatric medications are an important part of a comprehensive treatment plan for effectively treating people who have a mental health concern or mental illness. It’s good to know what drugs are being most-often prescribed for mental disorders in the U.S. These are the top 25 psychiatric medications by number of U.S. prescriptions dispensed in 2016, according to QuintilesIMS, a global infor...
Source: World of Psychology - October 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Medications Psychiatry Treatment medications for mental illness Psychiatric Drugs Psychiatric Medications psychiatric meds top psychiatric medications Source Type: blogs

Many Common Drugs Have Surprising Mental Side Effects
Many of us have become aware that prescription medications such as Ativan, Xanax and Klonopin may have serious side effects including memory issues. These drugs, which are generally prescribed for anxiety, can possibly increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease since they are in a class known as anticholinergic drugs. They work by blocking a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine in the nervous system. Many over-the-counter drugs used for sleep and allergies are anticholinergic drugs as well, a fact that’s been well publicized. A recent article on Forbes.com spotlighted OTC drugs with these anticholiner...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 6, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Is Suboxone Potent?
We get about 5000 readers of SuboxForum per day who ask question, provide answers, or share their experiences with buprenorphine medications. If you’re a patient on buprenorphine, consider joining us. It is free, and you’ll find help for starting buprenorphine, tapering off the medication, and everything in between.  Or if you’re a buprenorphine prescriber consider joining to see what patients are doing and thinking, and to help answer their questions! Yesterday someone wrote about the high potency of buprenorphine. He also wrote that it is hard to get off buprenorphine medications. I ended up writin...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - April 27, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: Jeffrey Junig MD PhD Tags: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Is Suboxone Potent?
We get about 5000 readers of SuboxForum per day who ask question, provide answers, or share their experiences with buprenorphine medications. If you’re a patient on buprenorphine, consider joining us. It is free, and you’ll find help for starting buprenorphine, tapering off the medication, and everything in between.  Or if you’re a buprenorphine prescriber consider joining to see what patients are doing and thinking, and to help answer their questions! Yesterday someone wrote about the high potency of buprenorphine. He also wrote that it is hard to get off buprenorphine medications. I ended up writin...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - April 27, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Is Suboxone Potent?
We get about 5000 readers of SuboxForum per day who ask question, provide answers, or share their experiences with buprenorphine medications. If you’re a patient on buprenorphine, consider joining us. It is free, and you’ll find help for starting buprenorphine, tapering off the medication, and everything in between.  Or if you’re a buprenorphine prescriber consider joining to see what patients are doing and thinking, and to help answer their questions! Yesterday someone wrote about the high potency of buprenorphine. He also wrote that it is hard to get off buprenorphine medications. I ended up writin...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - April 27, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Addiction Source Type: blogs

10 Things Every Alzheimer's Caregiver Needs to Know and Discuss with Their Doctor
TheAmerican Geriatrics Society has published a list of ten things doctors and their patients should consider, know and understand.I think it is important forevery caregiver of a person living with Alzheimer's, or a related dementia, todiscuss these 10 issues with the doctor. Doing this in advance might be one of the most important caregiverdecisions you can make.It might also be a good idea toshare this article in support groups, and bookmark (save) it so you can find it when you need it.What is Alzheimer's Disease?By Carole Larkinhttp://www.alzheimersreadingroom.comI think this is an important list of things that nee...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - April 13, 2017 Category: Neurology Authors: rtdemarco at gmail.com Tags: alzheimer care care of dementia patients dementia help for caregivers elderly dementia care geriatrics health help alzheimer's help with dementia help with dementia care life news memory care facility Source Type: blogs

Keeping Anxiety at Bay: My Arsenal of Recovery
Looking back on my childhood, there was never really a time I wasn’t unsure of myself. I never thought I was cute enough, smart enough, funny enough or fun enough. In fact, I doubted that any of my playmates actually liked me. On my birthday, I wondered whether my friends would actually show up to my party. And if they did, was it because my parents paid them to come? If so, how much? How much was I worth? Decades later, I realize this was one of the first indications that I suffered from anxiety. Through countless hours of therapy, research and reflection, I have come to understand the many manifestations of anxiet...
Source: World of Psychology - April 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Elizabeth Penney Tags: Anxiety and Panic Medications Personal Psychotherapy Self-Esteem Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Hypertension overwhelm Panic Attack Paranoia Psychology self-worth Suffering Worry Source Type: blogs

Medications that Increase the Risks of Falling
Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for adults 65 and older, and research suggests that those taking four or more medications are at an even greater risk than those who don ’t.ByAlzheimer's Reading RoomWhat ’s the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and DementiaHow to Test Your Memory for Alzheimer's and DementiaHow to Get Answers To Your Questions About Alzheimer's and Dementia“Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for adults 65 and older, and research suggests that those taking four or more medications are at an even greater risk than those who do...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - February 1, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care care of dementia patients dementia care health help alzheimer's help with dementia care medications falls Prescription Medications Risks risk of falling senior care Source Type: blogs

Benzos and Buprenorphine
The high safety of buprenorphine, except when combined with a benzodiazepine, has been twisted in comments about the drug (and in the minds of regulators) to buprenorphine being uniquely dangerous when combined with benzodiazepines, which is not true. I’ve heard more and more from insurers, regulators, and well-meaning agencies about the dangers of combining buprenorphine and benzodiazepines.   Some insurers protest paying for buprenorphine if patients are taking benzodiazepines.  Medicaid recently sent a letter that described a ‘severe risk’ of using benzodiazepines in patients on buprenor...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - January 27, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: Jeffrey Junig MD PhD Tags: Benzos Buprenorphine pharmacology risks Suboxone tolerance buprenorphine and benzodiazepines suboxone overdose xanax and suboxone Source Type: blogs

Benzodiazepines: What You Should Know Before Filling Your Prescription
The opioid crisis is still in full swing, but that doesn’t mean opioids are the only class of drugs hurting people. Benzodiazepines, like Xanax, Versed, Ativan, or Valium, are a class of drugs that are prescribed for anxiety and panic disorders. Prescriptions for and overdoses caused by benzodiazepines, which depress the central nervous system, have increased at alarming rates over the last twenty years. Here’s what you need to know about benzodiazepines before you fill your prescription. Like all prescription drugs, there are some people in specific circumstances who can benefit from properly used prescriptio...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - November 29, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: sheilas Tags: Richard Taite Source Type: blogs

The fuzzy line between medication use and abuse
Opioid painkillers, such as Vicodin (hydrocodone) and OxyContin (oxycodone), are crucial medical tools that are addictive and widely abused. Tranquilizers and sleeping pills of the benzodiazepine class, like Xanax (alprazolam), Ativan (lorazepam) and Klonopin (clonazepam), are safe and effective in limited, short-term use, but are often taken too freely, leading to drug tolerance and withdrawal risks. Stimulants such as Ritalin (methylphenidate) and Adderall (amphetamine) ease the burden of ADHD but are also widely used as college study aids as well as recreationally. All of these medications are available only by prescrip...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 16, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/steven-reidbord" rel="tag" > Steven Reidbord, MD < /a > Tags: Meds Patients Source Type: blogs

How Going Paleo Saved My Life
I have been fascinated by the entire Paleo and Primal movement that has exploded over the last few years. Initially seen as a fad diet craze by most, similar to the Atkins Diet, it has gathered momentum and not a little medical support. It has also been adopted by a great many athletes, which can be seen as a litmus test for such things as you don’t easily persuade triathletes and other endurance athletes to switch from tried and tested ‘carb loading’ prior to events. I experimented with going Paleo in 2010, but never stuck at it even though during my research I couldn’t find anybody who had s...
Source: A Daring Adventure - September 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tim Brownson Tags: Guest Posts paleo primal Source Type: blogs

Why You ’re An Idiot, And I Am Too
I love Donald Trump! Everything I read about him persuades me that he is the man to take this country forward. No, no, no, I meant I love Hillary Clinton! Everything I read about her persuades me thats she is the woman to take this country forward. Oh f. it, let’s face facts. If a country of 350+ million people has to pick from either of these two dubious characters to lead them, then quite frankly it’s more f.ed than a blind haddock who has cut his fin and swims into a ‘hungry sharks only’ bar looking for sympathy and maybe a bandaid. Do you want my opinion? Seriously, do you? If so, I’ll a...
Source: A Daring Adventure - September 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tim Brownson Tags: Life Coaching Source Type: blogs

Dementia Care, Which Drugs Increase the Risk of Falling
Medications can increase the risk of falls and falling; and, are a major cause of injuries and death in older adults.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomDuring the entire 8 and a half years, 3,112 days, that I was taking care of my mother, I worried about her falling.Falls can result in hip injuries, head injuries, or something worse.If you loved one is falling, or complaining of "dizziness" check out the list of medications below; and then, consult with your personal care doctor.Problems with Balance, Walking, Falling an Early Sign of DementiaThe drugs older people take can make them more susceptible to fallin...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - September 7, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care Alzheimer's Dementia dementia care dementia falls dementia help for caregivers family caregiving help alzheimer's help with dementia care memory care searches related to falling Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: September 3, 2016
Here in the U.S., we’re currently in the throes of Labor Day Weekend (and I’m at a local music and arts festival, celebrating!). Labor Day is the first Monday of September, and although it gives us a nice little three-day weekend, it’s about much more than that: Labor Day honors our country’s labor movement and “constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.” So, Happy Labor Day! I hope you’re doing something to celebrate all your hard work and, once you get a chance, check out this week&rsq...
Source: World of Psychology - September 3, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior Celebrities Depression Disorders Happiness Medications Memory and Perception Personality Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Sleep Stress Technology Android Anti-Anxiety Medication Antidepressan Source Type: blogs

Elaine’s transformation started with the Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox
Elaine was one of around 20 people who came to New York City in 2015 to start the Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, the initial test panel of volunteers described in the book. A year has now passed since that experience. Here is Elaine’s update: “Here it is: 1 year wheat-, grain-, and sugar-free. I never took actual ‘before’ pics, mostly because I really didn’t think that giving up all the low fat, fat-free, ‘healthy whole grains’ would make a difference, and that this lifestyle was something that I was going to stick with. Well, I was certainly wrong. “The weight loss is curre...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories acid reflux anxiety diabetes facial change pre-diabetes sinus sinusitis Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Louisiana Mother Knows 8 Vaccine Doses Killed Her 2 Month-Old Son
Two month-old Reid Thomas Englehart was vaccinated on May 20, 2015. He was given eight vaccine doses, which included the DTaP, Hib, polio, pneumococcal, hepatitis B and the oral rotavirus vaccines. These are the routine vaccines given to two month-old babies, even premature babies, in the United States and elsewhere. [1] At the time of his appointment, Reid was still wheezing from a previous infection and still had a residual cough, but his doctor insisted it was fine to vaccinate him, after a test came back that Reid was negative for pertussis. Nine days later, without a struggle and without any obstruction of his airways...
Source: vactruth.com - March 7, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Augustina Ursino Tags: Augustina Ursino Case Reports on Vaccine Injury Human DTaP vaccine Hepatitis B vaccine HiB Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV7) Polio Vaccine Reid Thomas Englehart Rotavirus Vaccine Vaccine Death Source Type: blogs

The psychiatric secrets that harm physicians
I know your secrets. I keep secrets for a living. I know about the eye opener before your shift; the Adderall prescribed for your son that you take in the morning; the Xanax a colleague gave you for upcoming air travel that that you take at night; the near DUI that you got out of by showing your hospital badge, the letters “Dr.” prominent on the left side; your wife who tells white lies about why you can’t attend the retirement party of a colleague’s (“Patient emergency. He has to go to the hospital. I do know you understand.”); or why you didn’t show up for your last appointment w...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 20, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

When will we start taking mental health seriously?
As a fourth-year medical student in a sub-internship in internal medicine, I have something that no doctor in America has. I have as much time as I want to spend with my patients. Don’t get me wrong, I am still a student. I’m still paying hospitals to let me be there, and I only have a maximum of four patients per day, but I inevitably end up spending more time with each patient than the average resident. Today, I spent my time with one patient in particular. She was a Caucasian woman who was a previous intravenous drug abuser who has been sober for fifteen years. She is on methadone and takes Xanax for anxiety...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 25, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Hospital Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The surprising reason behind an early refill of alprazolam
Theresa arrived in a cloud of noise and commotion. She had called after four o’clock the day before, but I hadn’t noticed the new message in my electronic inbox before I left the clinic. Her almost brand new alprazolam bottle and her pain pills were missing, and Theresa was reeling. As she walked down the hall to the exam room, I heard her explain to Autumn how she had been to Walmart and a couple of other stores, slinging her big handbag over her shoulder, opening it to pull out her wallet, stuff receipts, and her reading glasses away and fumble for her asthma inhaler. In my exam room she repeated her story an...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 2, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Elaine freed of anxiety, heartburn, sinusitis, prescriptions, and 37 pounds
“Before and after photo: wheat, grain and sugar free 5 months, down 37 lbs and off all meds: Xanax for anxiety, Dexilant and Prilosec for heartburn and indigestion, a steroid spray for chronic sinus infections. Feels good! Elaine lost the 37 pounds put there by national advice to eat more “healthy whole grains.” But, even more, she reversed anxiety and inflammatory conditions. By removing wheat and grains, she is no longer exposed to gliadin-derived opiates with their peculiar mind effects. She is no longer exposed to the gliadin that remains undigested and intact and initiates autoimmune phenomena. She ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 4, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories acid reflux anxiety gluten grains indigestion sinusitis Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Of PCPs and THC
By ROB LAMBERTS, MD The drug test came back abnormal.  There was THC present.  I walked back to Mrs. Johnson and raised my eyebrows. “What’s wrong?” she asked, not used to whatever kind of look I was giving her. “Uh, you forgot to mention to me that you smoke weed.” She blushed and then smirked.  “Well, yes, I guess I forgot to put that down on the sheet.  I don’t do it real often, but sometimes it takes mind off of things.  I just get real anxious about my kids, my husband…and my heart problems. I only smoke one or two a night” She&rsquo...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: THCB Source Type: blogs

Why I Disagree With The Government And Use Antipsychotics Anyway. It's Good Palliative Care!
The outcry over antipsychotics has ranged far and wide.  Every one from governmental agencies to senior advocacy organizations have pointed to the abysmal data.  Antipsychotics have a negative impact on morbidity and mortality.  They say we are chemically restraining those who are too fragile to stick up for themselves.  They say we are sedating instead of treating.And I disagree wholeheartedly. I manage a large group of moderately to severely demented nursing home patients.  They are agitated and delirious on a regular basis.  Often searches for infections, pain, constipation, depression, and...
Source: In My Humble Opinion - June 13, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Jordan Grumet Source Type: blogs

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
The urine drug screen commonly utilized in the emergency department is an immunoassay that uses antibodies to detect specific drugs or their metabolites. This allows for rapid screening for drugs of abuse, but it has many limitations.   Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is the confirmatory test, but it is more costly, time-consuming, and generally can only be performed by outside laboratories. This confirmatory test is generally not useful in the emergency department, but has a role in cases of pediatric exposures, research, or occupational drug testing.     One of the limitations of a urine d...
Source: The Tox Cave - June 1, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
The urine drug screen commonly utilized in the emergency department is an immunoassay that uses antibodies to detect specific drugs or their metabolites. This allows for rapid screening for drugs of abuse, but it has many limitations.   Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is the confirmatory test, but it is more costly, time-consuming, and generally can only be performed by outside laboratories. This confirmatory test is generally not useful in the emergency department, but has a role in cases of pediatric exposures, research, or occupational drug testing.     One of the limitations of a ...
Source: The Tox Cave - June 1, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Please forgive us for prescribing controlled drugs to just about everybody
Lately I’ve had the opportunity to work in an outpatient clinic where the regular doctor is out sick for a prolonged period of time. It is a breathtakingly beautiful little community, with green hills and a crystal clear river. It is also troubled by methamphetamine and prescription drug abuse. The little clinic in town is unwittingly a partner in this crime. Like the U.S. itself, this small community clinic has been generous with prescribing controlled substances for those who appear to need them. Sedatives in the benzodiazepine (Valium, Ativan and Xanax are brand name examples) family are prescribed for those with ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 25, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Pain management Source Type: blogs

Executions, Doctors, The U.S. Supreme Court, And The Breath Of Kings
This report concluded that even though prison officials decided to inject the drugs into Lockett’s femoral vein (which is a more difficult and risky procedure), Lockett’s surface and deep veins had “excellent integrity.” Another execution that was scheduled to occur that same night has now been stayed for six months, pending an investigation into Mr. Lockett’s execution. On July 23, 2014, Arizona encountered a problem with the same drug in the execution of Joseph Wood, wherein the condemned inmate allegedly gasped for almost two hours before dying. The executions have prompted two important bu...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 26, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: I. Glenn Cohen Tags: All Categories Health Law Policy Politics Public Opinion States Source Type: blogs

Amy’s Wheat Belly life transformation
Amy shared her amazing Wheat Belly experience with me. I believe that, like me, you will be astounded as how much misery she endured before she found this simple, inexpensive, powerful solution to health.   Dear Dr. Davis, Thank you for saving my life. I mean this in a literal sense, truly – I thank you.My name is Amy. I am a culinary artist (chef) and own a restaurant, A. Renee, in Bloomington, IL.My story is very complex so I’ll share the most condensed version I can. I lead a hectic lifestyle, as do most. Owning a demanding business in a field with the highest failure rate while raising two chil...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 18, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories gluten IBS inflamation ulcerative colitis Source Type: blogs