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Fine Dining, Dysphagia Style
Steve and Kristie Matt met 13 years ago and have been married for 12 of those years. “We immediately knew we were the perfect match from the moment we met,” says Kristie. They also both worked in Philadelphia’s bar/restaurant industry for years—many of them side-by-side—with Steve cooking and Kristie tending bar. A little more than two years ago, Steve noticed hoarseness and low volume in his voice. Shortly thereafter, he began to experience weakness in his legs. Steve and Kristie Matt Diagnosed with bulbar-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in January 2016, Steve immediately jumpe...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - May 17, 2017 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Meredith Pauly Tags: Speech-Language Pathology ALS Dysphagia Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs

Saving a life through health IT
I recently watched Jimmy Kimmel share a personal story about his new son on live television. His son, Billy Kimmel, was born with an undetected heart defect that required immediate surgery. Because of the great healthcare his son received, Billy lives to see his future.  While my heart ached as I listened to Jimmy’s emotional message, I was overcome with appreciation for all the work medical professionals do within healthcare. I think of the compassion and care that clinicians provide every day for patient-centered care – within our own healthcare system and beyond.  These prestigious professionals ha...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Louisiana Purchase
By ROBERT PEARL, MD “Pigs get fat, but hogs get slaughtered,” the saying goes. And so may it prove to be true for the pharmaceutical industry. Three articles, all published recently, illustrate the greed and egregious pricing by certain drug companies that are gaining public recognition and scrutiny. Marathon Pharmaceuticals LLC serves as a case in point. Over the last 15 years, its chairman and CEO Jeffrey Aronin generated a billion-dollar valuation for the company. As reported in a Wall Street Journal article, “Drug Price Revolt Prods a Pioneer to Cash Out,” he achieved this milestone not by inve...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

New Checks and Balances For Big Pharma
By ROBERT PEARL, MD “Pigs get fat, but hogs get slaughtered,” the saying goes. And so may it prove to be true for the pharmaceutical industry. Three articles, all published recently, illustrate the greed and egregious pricing by certain drug companies that are gaining public recognition and scrutiny. Marathon Pharmaceuticals LLC serves as a case in point. Over the last 15 years, its chairman and CEO Jeffrey Aronin generated a billion-dollar valuation for the company. As reported in a Wall Street Journal article, “Drug Price Revolt Prods a Pioneer to Cash Out,” he achieved this milestone not by inve...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Little Louisiana Purchase
By ROBERT PEARL, MD “Pigs get fat, but hogs get slaughtered,” the saying goes. And so may it prove to be true for the pharmaceutical industry. Three articles, all published recently, illustrate the greed and egregious pricing by certain drug companies that are gaining public recognition and scrutiny. Marathon Pharmaceuticals LLC serves as a case in point. Over the last 15 years, its chairman and CEO Jeffrey Aronin generated a billion-dollar valuation for the company. As reported in a Wall Street Journal article, “Drug Price Revolt Prods a Pioneer to Cash Out,” he achieved this milestone not by inve...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Interleukin-7 and Immunosenescence
Researchers here examine what is known of the role of interleukin-7 (IL-7) in the gradual decline and malfunction of the aging immune system. In the old, the immune system is both more active, producing chronic inflammation that drives the progression many of the most common age-related diseases, and at the same time less effective at carrying out its tasks. This is a major component of the frailty of old age. In the bigger picture, this is a story of molecular damage, misconfiguration of immune cells, and resulting disarray in the regulation of the immune response, but the low-level details of this progressive functional ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Joint Commission surveys matter more than we think
Recently, the online version of JAMA published an original investigation entitled “Patient Mortality During Unannounced Accreditation Surveys at US Hospitals.” The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of heightened vigilance during unannounced accreditation surveys on safety and quality of inpatient care. The authors found that there was a significant reduction in mortality in patients admitted during the week of surveys by The Joint Commission. The change was more significant in major teaching hospitals, where mortality fell from 6.41 percent to 5.93 percent during survey weeks, a 5.9...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 9, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/tracy-cardin" rel="tag" > Tracy Cardin, ACNP < /a > Tags: Policy Hospital Hospitalist Source Type: blogs

Waiting Room Neurology • UCEM
LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Last update: May 9, 2017 @ 9:59 am The Utopian College of Emergency for Medicine (UCEM) is devoted to keeping up with the latest evidence, techniques and iOS updates to ensure that waiting room medicine is at the forefront of critical care applied within the adverse environments of war zones, natural disasters and public hospitals. In an effort to combat that most pertinacious of symptoms ‘the chronic headache‘ – UCEM have scoured all the available informat...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Cassidy Tags: Neurology Utopian Medicine chronic headache iWR SPGB sphenopalatine ganglion block UCEM Waiting Room Medicine Source Type: blogs

This Was The Really Big News Of Last Week In Digital Health. What An Unexpected Outcome - NOT!
This appeared late last week.Evaluation of the My Health Record Participation TrialsPage last updated: 04 May 2017In July 2012, My Health Record (then called Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record) was launched. This is a secure online summary of a person ’s medications, diagnosed illnesses, treatments, allergies and tests. Each person can control what goes onto their My Health Record, and who is allowed to see it. For healthcare providers, knowing more about a patient’s medical history can lead to a better understanding of what is happening, and result in better treatment decisions. In most parts of ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - May 9, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Even short term use of oral steroids (less than 30 days) linked to increased risk of severe infection (sepsis), blood clots and fracture
One in five American adults in a commercially insured plan were given prescriptions for short term use of oral corticosteroids during a three year period, with an associated increased risk of adverse events. Of 1.5 million adults, 21% received at least 1 prescription for oral corticosteroids over 3 period.The most commonindications for use were:- upper respiratory tract infections- spinal conditions- allergies.Within 30 days of drug initiation, there wasan increase in rates of:- sepsis- venous thromboembolism- fractureRisk over the subsequent 31 –90 days.The increased risk persisted at prednisone equivalent doses of ...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - May 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Allergy Infectious Diseases Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

If pharmaceutical companies don ’t restrain themselves, someone else will
Imagine that you are gasping for breath, literally on the verge of death. Then someone injects you with a medicine and — miracle! — you are perfectly healthy again. Would you pay $300 for that injection? The treatment is epinephrine; your illness was a life-threatening allergy. And that $300 price? That reflects a six-fold increase from a couple of years ago. It’s one thing for medications to be expensive. But why does the same medication become more expensive over time?! Americans are justifiably angry about rising prices for drugs that have been on the market for years. Continue reading ... Your patien...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 7, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peter-ubel" rel="tag" > Peter Ubel, MD < /a > Tags: Meds Medications Source Type: blogs

Taking Charge of My Medical Crap - Again
I try to be in charge of my medical care. I really do. I take notes at appointments and I write little notes to myself in my calendar on things to ask my doctors at each visit. I am not sure if I am weird for doing this or not but I have no brain so I can't remember anything.In recent months, I have a new pain management doctor who has been very good at talking to me about different pain medications and what are options. I am very happy with this. Basically he is helping me switch to new medications to replace the ones that I have with ones that work better - fewer side effects, reducing the number of medications I am on, ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: doctor questions health issues medical crap organization Source Type: blogs

Highlights from 16th Annual Design of Medical Devices Conference
The University of Minnesota and their industry sponsors held the 16th Design of Medical Devices Conference, touted by the organizers as the world’s largest premiere medical devices conference. Hundreds of biomedical engineers, students, physicians, and industry representatives traveled from all over the world to gather in a truly unique atmosphere. The state of Minnesota has a rich history in medical innovation. Clinicians at the University of Minnesota performed the first successful open-heart operation and implanted the first small, portable, battery-powered pacemaker. In fact, a great deal of medical device techno...
Source: Medgadget - May 5, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

The Endoplasmic Reticulum: Networking Inside the Cell
Like a successful business networker, a cell’s endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the structure that reaches out—quite literally—to form connections with many different parts of a cell. In several important ways, the ER enables those other parts, or organelles, to do their jobs. Exciting new images of this key member of the cellular workforce may clarify how it performs its roles. Such knowledge will also help studies of motor neuron and other disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), that are associated with abnormalities in ER functioning. Structure Follows Function An illustration of some of ...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - May 4, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Kathryn Calkins Tags: Cell Biology Cells Cellular Processes Proteins RNA Source Type: blogs

Keep your seasonal allergies in check
Seasonal allergies can be frustrating. When spring crawls in, many people begin to experience all-too-familiar itchy and watery eyes, runny nose, and congestion. Symptoms of seasonal allergies are the result of an immune system in overdrive in response to pollen and other allergens. Those bothersome symptoms are intended to protect you from unwanted foreign particles, but in this situation they end up causing misery. There are quite a few options when it comes to controlling allergy symptoms, but we want to watch out for a few that can be quite dangerous when used incorrectly. Nasal steroids The first-line treatment for se...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dominic Wu, MD Tags: Asthma and Allergies Ear, nose, and throat Health Source Type: blogs

The Coombs test: some things you need to know
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - April 29, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: allergy and immunology hematology Source Type: blogs

Update on the clinical and pathologic aspects of ANCA diseases
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - April 28, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: allergy and immunology rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Note to Congress: It ’s your fault there’s a physician shortage
When you go to the internet or phone book today, there are hundreds of physicians listed in most urban areas. In the next two decades, you can expect more difficulty finding a physician in your hometown — a major physician shortage is looming. In the last year, I have noted many mid-career physicians are leaving the practice of medicine. While the growth of mid-level hospital administrators has ballooned at nearly 3,000 percent, fewer students are entering medical school. In fact, according to Compdata Surveys, hospital administrators now account for a large proportion of the costs of health care. The impending physi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 26, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kevin-r-campbell" rel="tag" > Kevin R. Campbell, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Heart Source Type: blogs

Minority Health Month
By Jameson Roth, Communications Intern Each April marks the beginning of Minority Health Month at UMMC, when we strive to celebrate and acknowledge the initiatives in place to reduce health disparities among minority groups in the greater Baltimore area. UMMC also seeks to honor the service of the individuals who work tirelessly to bring these initiatives to deserving communities across the city. One of these hardworking individuals is Anne Williams, DNP, RN, whose current role is director of community health improvement at University of Maryland Medical Center. Williams perfectly sums up her mission at UMMC, “I am c...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - April 25, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Parenting a Bone Marrow: Suffer, Suffer, Suffer, Suffer, Relief
I walked in on Bone Marrow as she was mainlining pollen. Talk about having your tongue tied. I entered the balcony of our apartment and there was my teenage bone marrow “daughter” injecting into herself—I mean, injecting into us—the pollen she had plucked from the air and collected in a small mountain on the bistro table.Bone Marrow saw my shock and said, “It’s maple, our worst allergen,” as if that statement was enough for me to understand her reasoning.Eventually, words came to my mind, and I said, “You can’t just shock our body into building immunity like this withou...
Source: cancerslayerblog - April 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer-free anniversary life lessons Source Type: blogs

The Payment Reform Landscape: For Employers, Keep Pushing Ahead
With all the tumult in Washington, D.C. surrounding health care reform, it is hard to know which reforms will be prioritized at the federal level and whether provider payment reform will still be a central focus. But in some corners of the health care Marketplace, efforts to implement payment reform continue, building on experimentation to better understand how to increase value. These efforts are coming from private employers, other large purchasers of health care, and the health plans that act as their agents. While employers are sure to be affected in many ways by changes to federal health care laws, much of the cost an...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 21, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Suzanne Delbanco and Andréa Elizabeth Caballero Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Insurance and Coverage Payment Policy Quality Behavioral Health employer-sponsored health coverage maternity care Payment Reform Source Type: blogs

Depression: The Magic of Shrubbery
This article was shoddy journalism; the report bordered on wishful thinking.Anybody looking for a quick fix for their depression by hitting Home Depot’s garden department may be disappointed in the results. It’s not that greenery is a bad idea. If you find aromatic plants stress-relieving and uplifting, you may experience benefits to having those plants around you. If you can get out to the forests and mountains for a hike, the fresh air and abundant nature will do you good. Do it often enough, and you might be able to manage mild depression that way. However, a tree in and of itself isn’t going to lift y...
Source: The Splintered Mind by Douglas Cootey - April 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Depression Goodreads Source Type: blogs

I Wonder Why Discharge Summaries Are Not Discussed With The Patient Before Being Uploaded To The myHR.
This blog appeared last week:My Health Record in General Practice Monday, 10 April 2017Dr Steve Hambleton, MBBS FAMA FRACGP (Hon) GAICDFollow Dr Steve on Twitter @SteveJHambletonAmongst my other roles, I've been a GP at the Kedron Park 7-Day Medical Centre in Brisbane for the past 29 years. Many of my patients have been in my care for a long time and I know them very well but I cannot be there for them every day. Like a lot of GPs who have been in the same practice for a long time, I mainly treat people with chronic and complex disease.I believe one of the responsibilities of General Practitioners is to facilitate patients...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - April 20, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

What Should Primary Care Look Like in the Future?
I truly hope that very soon I do not have to make an appointment at the GP when I suspect signs of a disease, but my GP will send me a message that she spotted something irregular in my latest test results and my digital health data, so I’d better visit. Let me show you in detail, how primary care should be carried out in the future! Digital health should become organic part of primary care in the future I live a fairly healthy life. I use data to improve my lifestyle and to make better decisions through optimizing my sleep pattern, my physical, my cognitive or my emotional abilities; and I had several genetic t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 19, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers digital health Education gc3 GP health trackers Healthcare Innovation primary care technology wearables Source Type: blogs

New bowel disorder treatments needed, FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION says
(HealthDay)—There’s no known cause or cure for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which affects more than 15 million Americans, based on the U. S. Food and Drug Management. Related Posts:FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION approves new drugs for…Eluxadoline eases pain and diarrhea for a few with IBSNew study indicates why children are likelier to develop…Zelnorm By Novartis: Risks Outweigh BenefitsProtein from bacteria alleviates food allergic reactionsThe post New bowel disorder treatments needed, FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION says appeared first on My Irritable Bowel Syndrome Story. (Source: My Irritable Bowel Syndrome Story)
Source: My Irritable Bowel Syndrome Story - April 17, 2017 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Ken Tags: IBS News Source Type: blogs

Four Crucial Questions To Ask Your Doctor
I am seeing an increasing number of patients who did not know they had a choice about taking a medicine or having a procedure. Why did you have that heart cath? A: My doctor said I should. Why are you on that medicine? A: My doctor prescribed it. It’s time we re-review the basic four questions you should ask your doctor. I wrote about this in April of 2015 for WebMD. Here is 2017 update: 1. What are the odds this test/medicine will benefit me? Medical decisions are like gambles. Benefit is not guaranteed. In my field, catheter ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) has a success rate approaching 99%, but th...
Source: Dr John M - April 17, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Grassley Seeks Answers from EpiPen Competitor
In early March 2017, Senator Chuck Grassley sent a letter to the manufacturer of Auvi-Q (an epinephrine injector similar to EpiPen), requesting an explanation of its pricing, including which entities within the health care system pay the cited list price of $4,500 for a two-pack when consumers without insurance pay $360 for the product. Kaléo said that as a part of its Auvi-Q AffordAbility program, patients with commercial insurance will pay nothing out-of-pocket. For patients without insurance and a household income of less than $100,000, Auvi-Q will be made available free of charge, according to the company. Eac...
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 14, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

A Care Plan?
A long time ago, back when I was in a support group weekly, I was offered a care plan to complete with my doctor to make sure I kept track of my cancer treatment.... It was several pages that were copies of copies of copies and difficult to read. I got the point but decided to skip that.There were several reasons (besides starting with the s-word) that I avoided it.First of all, it only covered your cancer diagnosis. It didn't include other issues, like additional cancer diagnoses, and other ailments. It only covered one cancer treatment.Second, I keep better records than my doctors. I started a spread sheet of my medical ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - April 11, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer history medical records Source Type: blogs

Don ’t let allergy season catch you off guard
The woman next to me in the checkout line looked upset. Her eyes were red and her nose was running. My first thought was to give her privacy, until I saw her shopping basket filled with supplies to fight allergy symptoms, and then our eyes met. “I can’t believe how bad my allergies are this year!” she said, exasperated. My fellow shopper isn’t the only one suffering. “Warm weather and a mild winter, as we’ve experienced this year, can stimulate trees to pollinate. The southern U.S., which has a warmer climate, is particularly susceptible to earlier allergy seasons. Other climate factors ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Asthma and Allergies Source Type: blogs

Keeping Anxiety at Bay: My Arsenal of Recovery
Looking back on my childhood, there was never really a time I wasn’t unsure of myself. I never thought I was cute enough, smart enough, funny enough or fun enough. In fact, I doubted that any of my playmates actually liked me. On my birthday, I wondered whether my friends would actually show up to my party. And if they did, was it because my parents paid them to come? If so, how much? How much was I worth? Decades later, I realize this was one of the first indications that I suffered from anxiety. Through countless hours of therapy, research and reflection, I have come to understand the many manifestations of anxiet...
Source: World of Psychology - April 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Elizabeth Penney Tags: Anxiety and Panic Medications Personal Psychotherapy Self-Esteem Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Hypertension overwhelm Panic Attack Paranoia Psychology self-worth Suffering Worry Source Type: blogs

H. pylori, a true stomach “bug”: Who should doctors test and treat?
In 1982, two Australian scientists discovered that a certain bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, was a common cause of persistent stomach inflammation and stomach ulcers. This realization revolutionized ulcer treatment. While fairly common, this infection usually causes no symptoms, but it can sometimes lead to ulcers in the stomach or the very first part of the small intestine (duodenum), and to certain types of stomach cancer. There is also evidence linking H. pylori infection to other conditions like iron-deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency. The bacteria are thought to spread through contaminated water, vomit, or f...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Wynne Armand, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Infectious diseases Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Madeline ’ s Wheat Belly success . . . in a real world
Madeline shared her story on our Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox private Facebook page. Her experience highlights many important aspects of this lifestyle, but especially how health can be transformed by sticking to this lifestyle and not being confused by “gluten-free” foods, the misguided advice of doctors, and overcoming stress that is inevitable in everyone’s lives. Her reward? Magnificent transformation in her health and appearance, all achieved by rejecting conventional dietary advice. “I’m posting to show that not everyone looses at the same speed–don’t be discouraged. I l...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 5, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle asthma diabetes gluten grains skin rash Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

OPDP Picks Up Steam on Enforcement Letters
After a fairly slow 2016, the United States Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Office of Prescription Drug Promotion (OPDP) issued a quick burst of letters in the span of nine days in December. This flurry of activity more than doubled the enforcement letters that had been issued up to that point in the year. Although there was an apparent increase in enforcement activity in December (perhaps related to the new Administration and the mark the old Administration wanted to leave on the industry), the type of activity and the nature of Draft Guidances issued in 2017 prior to the Trump Administration taking office ind...
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 5, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

The flu shot saves children ’s lives
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Of the 358 children who died from influenza between 2010 and 2014, only 26% had been vaccinated against it, according to a study just released in the journal Pediatrics. That means 74%, or three out of four of them, had not. And maybe if they had been vaccinated, they’d be alive right now. Of all the vaccines I give as a pediatrician, the flu shot is the one that families refuse most. Parents don’t think they need it. They don’t think it works. They think it is dangerous. This frustrates me, because none of these reasons for refusing the flu shot are true. Influenza can be a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Cold and Flu Infectious diseases Parenting Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs

HL7 Releases New FHIR  Update
HL7 has announced the release of a new version of FHIR designed to link it with real-world concepts and players in healthcare, marking the third of five planned updates. It’s also issuing the first release of the US Core Implementation Guide. FHIR release 3 was produced with the cooperation of hundreds of contributors, and the final product incorporates the input of more than 2,400 suggested changes, according to project director Grahame Grieve. The release is known as STU3 (Standard for Trial Use, release 3). Key changes to the standard include additional support for clinical quality measures and clinical decision s...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - April 3, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Anne Zieger Tags: Clinical Decision Support EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR Healthcare Healthcare Interoperability HealthCare IT HL7 Medication Adherence AthenaHealth Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Boston Children's Source Type: blogs

Immune Cell Epigenetics Become More Disarrayed with Age
This study focused on immune tissue: specifically, CD4+ T cells. The immune system is like a symphony orchestra, with many different types and subtypes of cells working together to fight infections. But as the immune system ages, its response to infection weakens for reasons that are not yet clear. One long-standing debate amongst scientists concerns two central hypotheses: either the functional degradation is caused by a loss of cellular performance, or it is down to a loss of coordination among cells. To resolve the debate, scientists have studied many different cell types, analysing 'average' gene expression prof...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 31, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine Is Our Best Hope In The Fight Against Cancer
In the fight against cancer, precision medicine is one of the most promising tools and the logical outcome of current healthcare trends. As start-ups offering personalized healthcare solutions multiply like mushrooms after rain, governments and regulatory agencies have to give appropriate responses in regulating the grass-root healthcare jungle. Here is my analysis about the potential and dilemmas about precision medicine. Precision medicine is the logical outcome of modern healthcare There is one phrase, which is not part of the Hippocratic Oath, but everyone in medicine knows it. Primum non nocere, meaning “first ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 30, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Genomics Healthcare Design Personalized Medicine AI cancer cancer research chemotherapy digital gc4 genetics Genome Innovation oncology precision medicine targeted treatment technology Source Type: blogs

Why the AHCA would have been bad for children — and an unavoidable truth moving forward
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Last week the Republicans’ proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, failed to get the support it needed and was taken off the table. This is good news for children. Despite all the problems with health insurance generally and the ACA specifically, things are going pretty well for children when it comes to health insurance. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, currently 95% of children in the United States have health insurance, thanks to Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and the ACA. The proposed replacement, called the Am...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Health Managing your health care Parenting Source Type: blogs

Bit by the Research Bug: Priscilla ’s Growth as a Scientist
This is the third post in a new series highlighting NIGMS’ efforts toward developing a robust, diverse and well-trained scientific workforce. Credit: Christa Reynolds. Priscilla Del Valle Academic Institution: The University of Texas at El Paso Major: Microbiology Minors: Sociology and Biomedical Engineering Mentor: Charles Spencer Favorite Book: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot Favorite Food: Tacos Favorite music: Pop Hobbies: Reading and drinking coffee It’s not every day that you’ll hear someone say, “I learned more about parasites, and I thought, ‘This is so cool!...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - March 28, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Christa Reynolds Tags: Being a Scientist Bacteria BUILD Infectious Diseases Profiles Training Source Type: blogs

Dr. Greene ’ s Guide to Allergy Care: How To Prevent And Treat This Season ’s Allergies
If you’re in the Northern hemisphere of this beautiful planet, it’s the beginning of spring for you. The blossoming flowers and budding leaves are amazing to watch, but can also trigger allergies. If you or a loved one experiences allergies, here are some of my favorite recommendations on what can be done to help – a guide to allergy care for you and your family. How to Prevent Symptoms: Avoid Triggers Your first step towards feeling better on a daily basis is avoiding the things that cause your allergic reactions in the first place. TIPS TO AVOID ALLERGENS: – Keep doors and windows closed on high-p...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - March 27, 2017 Category: Child Development Authors: Alexandra Carmichael Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Allergies Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 27th 2017
In conclusion, DNAm of multiple disease-related genes are strongly linked to mortality outcomes. The recently established epigenetic clock (DNAm age) has received growing attention as an increasing number of studies have uncovered it to be a proxy of biological ageing and thus potentially providing a measure for assessing health and mortality. Intriguingly, we targeted mortality-related DNAm changes and did not find any overlap with previously established CpGs that are used to determine the DNAm age. Our findings are in line with evidence, suggesting that DNAm involved in ageing or health-related outcomes are mostly...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 26, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

An open letter to Psychological Medicine, again!
In conclusion, noted Wilshire et al., “the claim that patients can recover as a result of CBT and GET is not justified by the data, and is highly misleading to clinicians and patients considering these treatments.” In short, the PACE trial had null results for recovery, according to the protocol definition selected by the authors themselves. Besides the inflated recovery results reported in Psychological Medicine, the study suffered from a host of other problems, including the following: *In a paradox, the revised recovery thresholds for physical function and fatigue–two of the four recovery mea...
Source: virology blog - March 23, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information adaptive pacing therapy CFS chronic fatigue syndrome clinical trial cognitive behavior therapy Dave Tuller exercise graded exercise therapy mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis outcome PACE trial recovery Source Type: blogs

Functional Tooth Regrowth Demonstrated in a Canine Model
This study represents a substantial advancement in organ replacement therapy through the transplantation of bioengineered organ germ as a practical model for future whole-organ regeneration. Whole-tooth replacement therapy holds great promise for the replacement of lost teeth by reconstructing a fully functional bioengineered tooth using three-dimensional cell manipulation in vitro. It is anticipated that bioengineering technology will ultimately enable the reconstruction of fully functional organs in vitro through the proper arrangement of epithelial and mesenchymal cell components. Many researchers have attempted ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 21, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

More on PCSK9 Inhibition to Dramatically Reduce Cholesterol Levels, Lowering the Risk of Later Cardiovascular Disease
There is good evidence for at least some methods of achieving dramatic reductions in blood cholesterol in humans to be safe and reduce the risk of age-related cardiovascular issues. To pick one of the underlying mechanisms involved in these benefits, the common age-related condition of atherosclerosis is at root caused by interactions between damaged cholesterol and the cells of blood vessel walls. Cells become irritated by the presence of that cholesterol, and this begins a series of overreactions and unfortunate events that leads to the generation of fatty plaques that narrow blood vessels and weaken blood vessel walls. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 18, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The scary evolution of direct-to-consumer advertising
One night in 1997, as Americans watched Touched by an Angel they were touched by something else unexpected: an ad for a prescription allergy pill called Claritin, sold directly to patients. Prescription drugs had never been sold directly to the public before — a marketing tactic called direct-to-consumer or DTC advertising. How could average people, who certainly had not been to medical school, know if the medication was appropriate or safe without a doctor’s recommendation? Soon, ads for Meridia, Propecia, Singulair, Paxil, Prozac, Vioxx, Lipitor, and Viagra followed — exhorting patients to “ask th...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 17, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/martha-rosenberg" rel="tag" > Martha Rosenberg < /a > Tags: Conditions Cancer Source Type: blogs

NasoNeb II Nasal Nebulizer Gets Green Light in Europe
MedInvent, a company based in Medina, Ohio, received European CE Mark approval for its NasoNeb II Nasal Nebulizer. The device is intended for patients with chronic sinusitis and allergic rhinitis, delivering drugs (typically budesonide) into the nasal and paranasal sinus cavities. The company says the product provides superior spread of the drug through the target sinuses and promises “no pulmonary deposition.” It can be used by patients at home, each session lasting only a couple minutes. Components are made to be easily washed and reused. Here’s a company promo video introducing the NasoN...
Source: Medgadget - March 14, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

An open letter to Psychological Medicine about “ recovery ” and the PACE trial
In conclusion, noted Wilshire et al., “the claim that patients can recover as a result of CBT and GET is not justified by the data, and is highly misleading to clinicians and patients considering these treatments.” In short, the PACE trial had null results for recovery, according to the protocol definition selected by the authors themselves. Besides the inflated recovery results reported in Psychological Medicine, the study suffered from a host of other problems, including the following: *In a paradox, the revised recovery thresholds for physical function and fatigue–two of the four recovery mea...
Source: virology blog - March 13, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information adaptive pacing therapy CFS chronic fatigue syndrome clinical trial cognitive behavior therapy Dave Tuller exercise graded exercise therapy mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis outcome PACE trial recovery Source Type: blogs

Happy 12th birthday to the Health Business Blog
The Health Business Blog has turned 12 years old! Continuing a tradition I established with birthdays one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten and eleven I have picked out a favorite post from each month. Thanks for continuing to read the blog! March 2016: Health Wonk Review -Tales of the Trump My roundup of policy posts from the blogosphere took Trump seriously and literally. April 2016: Listen app – ResApp diagnoses respiratory ailments An Australian company developed a smartphone app to diagnose respiratory diseases by analyzing the sound...
Source: Health Business Blog - March 13, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: dewe67 Tags: Announcements Blogs Source Type: blogs

IVF patients need to learn that doctors don't have all the answers
Dear Dr Malpani,I read your recent email with interest, as it relates directly to me.After 5 years of IVF and only one successful transfer, which occurred last year at the age of 49 (2016) and I was pregnant for 11 weeks. Unfortunately the embryo failed at 11 weeks due to Edwards syndrome, but these were my own eggs from about age 46.Since this, I have now done two transfers with donor eggs (23 year old donor) and neither has worked.The only successfully pregnancy I had involved a treatment protocol designed by a fertility immunologist, as a result of extensive and expensive blood tests in the US (exactly a you describe - ...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - March 13, 2017 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs