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Food allergies are a public health crisis we can no longer ignore
Nearly every American is touched by serious chronic illness, either as a patient or as a caregiver. The federal government recognizes the far-reaching effects of such conditions, and agencies like the National Institutes of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conduct surveillance of these diseases. Such research allows us to better understand the burden of different diseases, develop new treatments and prevention practices, and protect the public’s health. And it is why surveillance programs exist for virtually every major disease and illness impacting the American public. Despite this fact, there i...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 19, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jennifer-j-bute" rel="tag" > Jennifer J. Bute, PhD < /a > Tags: Conditions Allergies & Immunology Pediatrics Primary Care Source Type: blogs

In Iraq I saved lives. Now, I can ’t give an allergy shot.
I entered the room to see a face that I recognized. As soon as I looked at my chart, I immediately knew this patient. I saved their life last year. I know this because the patient told me so. The teachers and mentors that I was privileged to learn from and train with 25 years ago emphasized the essential principle of osteopathic medicine — we make physical contact with our patients. Some of this is in the form of manual medicine skills to help balance the musculoskeletal, respiratory, lymphatic and digestive systems, and some of this contact is in the form of a thorough, focused physical exam. Some of the contact occ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/todd-fredricks" rel="tag" > Todd  Fredricks, DO < /a > Tags: Physician Allergies & Immunology Primary Care Public Health Policy Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 18th 2017
In this study, researchers put some numbers to the correlation, and improve on previous attempts to rule out wealth and other effects as significant contributing causes. A study finds that a Chinese policy is unintentionally causing people in northern China to live 3.1 years less than people in the south, due to air pollution concentrations that are 46 percent higher. These findings imply that every additional 10 micrograms per cubic meter of particulate matter pollution reduces life expectancy by 0.6 years. The elevated mortality is entirely due to an increase in cardiorespiratory deaths, indicating that air poll...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 17, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

How anti-vaccine parents are finding doctors willing to exempt their kids
Dr. Tara Zandvliet was inundated with calls and emails from parents last year, after California passed a law nixing personal beliefs as an exemption from school vaccinations. Suddenly, many parents sought exemptions for medical reasons. Someone even faked two medical exemption forms purportedly written by the San Diego pediatrician, copying a legitimate document she’d provided for a patient and writing in the names of students she’d never treated, she said. She learned of the forgeries only when the school called for verification. Only 1 in 10 families contacting her for such exemptions could cite a legitimate ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 16, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/ana-b-ibarra-and-barbara-feder-ostrov" rel="tag" > Ana B. Ibarra and Barbara Feder Ostrov < /a > Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205. Question 1 Meigs’ Syndrome resolves after removal of the tumour. What is the classic triad of Meigs’ Syndrome? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet771338363'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetli...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis Argyll Robertson aspergilloma aspergillus Calabar extrinsic allergic alveolitis invasive aspergillosis kartagener's syndrome liver Loa loa worms Meigs syndrome ocular oa Source Type: blogs

$40 Keychain Device Detects Food Allergens
For those with allergic reactions to certain foods, cross-contamination or accidental mislabeling can lead to reactions ranging from annoying to life-threatening. To address this health need, researchers at Harvard Medical School have made a device that can quickly, inexpensively, and accurately detect common food antigens. The integrated exogenous antigen testing, cleverly abbreviated iEAT, was developed to detect five common antigens, including those in peanuts, hazelnuts, wheat, milk, and egg whites. The device consists of three components: a small tube-like extraction kit, a disposable electrode chip, and a k...
Source: Medgadget - September 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Pathology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Pursuing a career as a physician: A reminder why
Last week, I spent a few hours completing an online module for one of my immunology courses. The purpose of this module was simply to expose students to the format of lecturing and assessments that would take place throughout the length of this course. The portion of the module that I found really exciting was a series of videos depicting scenes at a local clinic where a physician examined a patient with psoriasis. Although learning about the biology behind the condition was intellectually stimulating, the video reminded me once again of my purpose of pursuing a career as a physician: to educate patients while comforting t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 12, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sangrag-ganguli" rel="tag" > Sangrag Ganguli < /a > Tags: Education Dermatology Medical school Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Betterhumans Aims to Run Senolytic Trials
Some of you may remember Betterhumans as one of a number of transhumanist community websites from years back, providing news and advocacy in service of efforts to improve the human condition. Extending healthy lifespan by engineering practical rejuvenation therapies has always been a core transhumanist goal. In one of the more interesting second acts in our community, the Betterhumans name is now hanging on the door of a medical research and development non-profit. This organization runs a supercentenarian study, and is now working on trials of senolytic therapies, starting with the dasatinib and quercetin combination that...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Many Common Drugs Have Surprising Mental Side Effects
Many of us have become aware that prescription medications such as Ativan, Xanax and Klonopin may have serious side effects including memory issues. These drugs, which are generally prescribed for anxiety, can possibly increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease since they are in a class known as anticholinergic drugs. They work by blocking a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine in the nervous system. Many over-the-counter drugs used for sleep and allergies are anticholinergic drugs as well, a fact that’s been well publicized. A recent article on Forbes.com spotlighted OTC drugs with these anticholiner...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 6, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

10 things parents should know about flu shots
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire We started giving flu shots at our practice last week, and it made me not just happy, but relieved. I know how bad influenza can be and I always feel better when we can start preventing it. Every year, influenza sickens millions, hospitalizes hundreds of thousands, and kills tens of thousands. This is not your average common cold. While it is especially dangerous for anyone who already has a health problem (such as a weakened immune system, or heart or lung problems), it can be dangerous for healthy people, too. Even if you don’t get that sick from the flu, aside from missing school or ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Cold and Flu Infectious diseases Parenting Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs

The Top 9 Augmented Reality Companies in Healthcare
When Pokemon Go conquered the world, everyone could face the huge potential in augmented reality. Although the hype around the virtual animal hunting settled, AR continues to march triumphantly into more and more industries and fields, including healthcare. Here, I listed the most significant companies bringing augmented reality to medicine and healing.  Augmented Reality Vs. Virtual Reality Augmented reality (AR) has shown an amazing development curve since Boeing researcher, Thomas Caudell coined the term “augmented reality” in 1990. The technology changed how an NFL football game is perceived through te...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 31, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Medical Augmented Reality AR future GC1 Health Health 2.0 Innovation Medical education Medicine technology top VR Source Type: blogs

Molecular Biology of Kinetoplastid Parasites
Hemanta K. Majumder presents a new book on Molecular Biology of Kinetoplastid Parasites Written by a team of authors active in the field of Leishmania and Trypanosoma research, this volume reviews the current research in kinetoplastid parasites. With an emphasis on cellular and molecular biology, areas covered include epigenetic regulation, cellular defence, manipulation of host macrophages, B lymphocyte response, adhesion and invasion of host tissues, immune evasion, immunotherapy, hemeproteins, phospholipids biosynthesis and DNA topoisomerases. A common theme throughout the book is the identification of new therapeutic t...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - August 31, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Ultravision Removes Smoke from Surgical Scene: Interview with Managing Director of Alesi Surgical
Smoke in a surgical field is a common problem, particularly during laparoscopic and robotic procedures, that arises from the use of electrosurgical instruments, lasers, and other devices. Typically, smoke is vented out through one of the instrument ports, too often with slow and imperfect results. Alesi Surgical, a company out of Cardiff, Wales, offers a technology that significantly improves on simple ventilation (see video at the bottom of this post). We spoke with Dominic Griffiths, PhD, Managing Director of Alesi Surgical, about how the company’s Ultravision technology works, how it was developed, and w...
Source: Medgadget - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Surgery Thoracic Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

What to Consider When Administering GBCAs
This study demands the need for further research on GBCAs, and the protocol physicians should take when deciding on whether or not to administer the drug. (Source: radRounds)
Source: radRounds - August 25, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Einkorn No Knead Artisan Bread (and a primer on ancient wheat)
All wheat is not the same. What we now call wheat is actually the product of hybridization and cross breeding of wheat species to increase crop yields, ease harvesting, decrease costs and scale up production. As a result, where there were once just 5 or so species of wheat, there are now literally thousands, which genetically, may be virtually unrecognizable to ancient grains from which they are descended. Allow me to introduce these so-called ancient grains to you now: Einkorn Wheat (14 chromosomes / Diploid): The first known wheat ever cultivated by humans (circa 3300 BC in Europe) is Einkorn Wheat, which has just 14 ch...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 24, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Bread Artisan Einkorn Flour Lahey No-Knead Wheat Source Type: blogs

5 Signs Your Therapy Is Working
You're reading 5 Signs Your Therapy Is Working, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Most people take that initial plunge into therapy with the highest of hopes. We want to make real changes in our lives. We want to be more successful. We want to be in control of our emotions. In short, we want to BE better than we are today, right at this very moment. For therapists, it’s a requirement of their own success to ensure that they are providing treatment that will steer their patients toward a positive outco...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angela Tags: confidence depression featured happiness health and fitness motivation productivity tips psychology relationships self confidence self improvement benefits of therapy build healthy relationships Mentegram stay healthy work wi Source Type: blogs

New Research Says
How many times when you are talking to your doctor have you heard them say'new research says...'or'recent studies have shown....'? I get it all the time. And I am not sure I like it. Or how it makes me feel...I realize being a doctor or other medical professional takes a lot of work and study just to get there and then they need to constantly work at staying up to date so of course they are reading research and following studies. But when they shove it in my face by saying that the new research told them this, I feel like they aren't practicing medicine but reading research.I realize a lot of new information comes out for ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - August 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient clinical trials medical research uncertainty with doctors Source Type: blogs

Meditation Isn ’t the Answer to Overthinking
You're reading Meditation Isn’t the Answer to Overthinking, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. You’ve been meditating daily for the last week, month, or maybe even years. In moments it’s blissful, in others it can be frustrating. Thoughts come and go – but you’re now more aware of them. But not too long afterwards a meditation, your mind can go back to its habitual patterns of thinking, churning negative thoughts in different periods of the day. Over time, I’ve come ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - August 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Samy Felice Tags: confidence depression featured happiness meditation philosophy breathing focus mditation stress relief Source Type: blogs

Why the anti-vaxxer label makes this medical student uncomfortable
I’ve had some of the most wonderful experiences of my entire medical training working with kids and their families. And this, to me, is not surprising. After all, I envisioned myself as a pediatrician long before I ever entered medical school. However, I remember that more frequent news of declining vaccination rates at one point temporarily gave me pause: What would it be like to take on the tremendous responsibility of convincing a parent to protect their child against some of the world’s most dangerous diseases? I knew that with time I would be up for the challenge, but early on in my training, it definitely...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/subha-mohan" rel="tag" > Subha Mohan < /a > Tags: Education Allergies & Immunology Medical school Pediatrics Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Why You Should Never Sign the Refusal to Vaccinate Form
Conclusion These refusal to vaccinate forms were created to increase vaccination rates, scare parents, and potentially take children away from parents who decline vaccines or mandate medical treatment. Parents should refuse to sign these forms. Has your child’s health care provider asked you to sign a refusal to vaccinate form? How did you respond? Please share your experiences in the comments section below. You can help other parents by sharing this article on social media. References: https://www.aap.org/en-us/Documents/immunization_refusaltovaccinate.pdf http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/115/5/1428.lo...
Source: vactruth.com - August 21, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Missy Fluegge Tags: Missy Fluegge Top Picks Patricia Finn refusal form truth about vaccines vaccine refusal Source Type: blogs

Food allergies are frightening, not funny
Last night, my son was reading a book that was required summer reading for 6th grade. This book was published over 30 years ago. When he got to a sentence that used the word “retard,” he stopped and innocently asked, “Mom, what does that word mean?” At first, I was shocked that he did not know the meaning, but as I thought about it more, I realized this term was no longer an acceptable descriptor in society. He simply had never heard someone use the term. When I grew up, I vividly remember people would joke and use the phrase. This was considered the normal slang, and common in everyday conversation...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lianne-mandelbaum" rel="tag" > Lianne Mandelbaum < /a > Tags: Patient Allergies & Immunology Mainstream media Pediatrics Primary Care Source Type: blogs

What Every Parent Needs to Know About Back to School Vaccine Threats and Exemptions
Conclusion Because the mainstream media has financial interest in promoting vaccines, informed parents must seek information elsewhere about back to school vaccine mandates and exemptions. Parents, as you prepare to send your child back to school, do your homework and determine which exemptions are available in your area. A list of vaccine exemptions for all fifty states is published online by the National Vaccine Information Center. Sharing this article with other parents will also help them make informed decisions about vaccines. References: http://www.nvic.org/vaccine-laws/state-vaccine-requirements.aspx http://www.oma...
Source: vactruth.com - August 17, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Missy Fluegge Tags: Top Stories truth about vaccines Vaccine Exemptions Source Type: blogs

Home remedies: stung by a bee
Generally, bee stings are just annoying, plus home treatment is all that’s necessary to relieve the pain of bee stings. In case you’re allergic to bee stings or you get stung numerous periods, you may have a more-serious reaction that needs emergency treatment. Related Posts:How Can I Keep My Ibs Under Control?How Does Extreme Period Pain Caused By Endometriosis Differ…Treatment for IBS With Severe ConstipationNew IBS treatment shows possible in Phase 2 researchThe gene-sequence swap using CRISPR in order to cure…The post Home remedies: stung by a bee appeared first on My Irritable Bowel Syndrome ...
Source: My Irritable Bowel Syndrome Story - August 11, 2017 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Ken Tags: IBS News Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound to Improve Effectiveness of Cancer Drugs: Interview with Focused Ultrasound Foundation ’s Jessica Foley, PhD
Most people think of ultrasound as an imaging modality. Yet, there are many other clinical uses for the high frequency soundwaves. Focused ultrasound waves can promote the opening of the blood-brain barrier, and they can be used to ablate fibroids, among other uses. Yet the potential of ultrasound in clinical medicine is far from fully realized, as new uses and studies evaluating them are rapidly sprouting, and a particularly interesting one involving checkpoint inhibitors to treat stage IV metastatic breast cancer is about to begin. To get a sense for how ultrasound can improve cancer care in combination with checkpoint i...
Source: Medgadget - August 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine News Source Type: blogs

These Recommendations From The Office Of The Information Commissioner On The myHR Are Worth Publishing In Full.
These appeared a few days ago:My Health Records You can register for your own My Health Record. A My Health Record is an electronic summary of your health information. Healthcare providers can add information about your health to your My Health Record, in accordance with your access controls. This may include information such as medical history and treatments, diagnoses, medications and allergies.You can control your own My Health Record, including by choosing to restrict which healthcare provider organisations can access it and what information is included.Follow these tips to protect your My Health Record:Read the terms...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - August 10, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

The Dangerous Reasons You Should Never Give Your Baby Tylenol After Vaccines
Conclusion The widely accepted use of acetaminophen pain relievers, such as Tylenol, has been shown in scientific studies to deplete levels of our bodies’ master antioxidant, glutathione. Parents should question the popular notion that dozens of vaccine doses in infancy are safe, and they should certainly research the damaging effects acetaminophen can have on the developing brain. References: http://articles.mercola.com/…vaccine-dosage-for-babies.aspx https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003292.htm http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=97635&page=1 http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=97635&...
Source: vactruth.com - August 9, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Missy Fluegge Tags: Missy Fluegge Top Stories acetaminophen glutathione truth about vaccines Tylenol Source Type: blogs

EU Court Issues Over-Reaching Ruling on Vaccines
In June 2017, the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled that courts may consider vaccines to be the cause of an illness, even if there is no scientific evidence confirming a link. The Court said that if the development of a disease is timely to the person’s receiving a vaccine, it may serve as enough proof – provided that the person was previously healthy with a lack of history of the disease in their family and if a significant number of disease cases are reported among people receiving a particular vaccine. The ruling stemmed from the case of a French man known as J.W., who was vaccinated against hepa...
Source: Policy and Medicine - August 9, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

New Zealand Seems To Be Making Some Great Headway With A Simple Summary Record.
This appeared last week:HealthOne an e-health record for all?Liane Topham-Kindleyliane@nzdoctor.co.nzTuesday 01 August 2017, 1:40PM The electronic shared health records system HealthOne is operating throughout the South Island as of today, with Nelson Marlborough DHB officially joining the system. Now all DHBs in the South Island have access to HealthOne allowing general practice teams, hospital clinicians, pharmacists and a growing number of community providers access to shared information including test results, allergies, medications, previous hospital admissions and appointments and med ical imaging. It’s a s...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - August 9, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Celgene Settles Cancer Drug Whistleblower Suit
Celgene Corporation has settled a whistleblower lawsuit for $280 million, alleging that the pharmaceutical company committed fraud promoting Thalomid, a cancer drug allegedly promoted for uses not approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The settlement will be broken up between the United States and twenty-eight states and Washington, D.C. California will receive the largest state sum, $4.7 million. The payment is equivalent to about two weeks’ worth of sales of Revlimid, which generated $6.97 billion in revenue for Celgene last year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The settlement,...
Source: Policy and Medicine - August 3, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

US Senate Passes FDA User Fees, Right to Try and Opioid Legislation
After many months of debate, both chambers of Congress passed the FDA User Fee Package. This comes after the Senate passed its bill (S. 934) which cleared the Senate HELP Committee in May on a bipartisan basis. The House passed its bill on July 13 (H.R. 2430). The FDA Reauthorization Act (FDARA) renews and enhances the FDA drug, medical-device, biosimilar, and generic-drug user-fee provisions. The bill was uniquely tied to “Right to Try” legislation, and the Senate also passed bipartisan legislation on the opioid epidemic. Senate FDARA Bill The politics of the bill were intricately locked in with another memb...
Source: Policy and Medicine - August 3, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Explore the behavioral factors behind antibiotic misuse
None of us wants to live in a world without access to lifesaving antibiotics. No patient should be subject to an allergic reaction or organ dysfunction from these drugs. No one wants to contract a potentially deadly form of diarrhea, claiming roughly 30,000 lives a year in the U.S., that can take hold after antibiotics wipe out healthy gut bacteria. Yet, every day, patients are prescribed antibiotics that they did not need or that are not clinically indicated, exposing them to the risk of these harms. In clinics, 30 percent of prescriptions are unnecessary. In hospitals, 20 percent to 50 percent of...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 1, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peter-pronovost" rel="tag" > Peter Pronovost, MD, PhD < /a > Tags: Meds Medications Source Type: blogs

MOCAcare Review: Heart Monitor in Your Pocket and Blood Pressure Cuff on Your Wrist
The essence of digital health is making patients the point of care – no matter how unexpected the method. Could you ever imagine that there will be a time when you could measure your heart rate with a device slipped into your key chain holder or your blood pressure on your wrist? MOCAcare does both of that. Moreover, it provides its measurements in good quality and gives meaningful information even for laypeople. The heart of the matter MOCAcare’s tagline can be familiar as the title of a famous Graham Greene book about the destructive power of pity, but also as a song by Pete Doherty’s former band, The ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 1, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers future gc3 Health 2.0 heart heart health heart rate Innovation Personalized medicine review wearable wearables Source Type: blogs

Pain in the Bite
​A 14-year-old boy with no past medical history was brought to the ED in some distress by his parents. One hour earlier while looking for his baseball glove in the garage he had felt a small pinprick just above his right ankle. The patient, however, became increasingly uncomfortable and began complaining of diffuse abdominal pain.​His initial vital signs were a temperature of 97°F, heart rate of 112 bpm, blood pressure of 151/91 mm Hg, and 98% pulse oximetry on room air. He appeared uncomfortable, was diaphoretic, and had a rigid abdomen. A small puncture wound with some mild erythema to the lateral right ankle was...
Source: The Tox Cave - August 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

UNICEF Vaccinates African Refugee Children with Combination OPV/IPV Vaccines as Part of Vaccination Experiment
In 2014, a report published by UNICEF revealed that, due to an outbreak of polio in Kenya, the charity had decided it was time to step up their efforts to contain the disease. According to their reports, the most effective way to increase the children’s immunity was to vaccinate them with a combination of both the oral (OPV) and the injectable polio vaccine (IPV) simultaneously. [1] According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “There are two types of vaccines that protect against polio: inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). IPV is given as an injection in ...
Source: vactruth.com - July 31, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Christina England, BA Hons Tags: Christina England Interviews Recent Articles Top Stories Bill Gates Polio Vaccine truth about vaccines vaccine-induced polio Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 31st 2017
In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 30, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Study: Change Your DNA with Mind-Body Interventions
According to this study, people who practice MBIs such as meditation, yoga and tai chi experience a decrease in the production of NF-kB and cytokines. These are proteins that cause inflammation on the cellular level. This inflammatory response the body has was useful to humans in the past, when stress was short lived and the threat of infection ran high. But today, with stress more of a long-term issue, a pro-inflammatory gene response can linger, causing psychiatric problems such as depression, and medical issues such as cancer, say the researchers. “Millions of people around the world already enjoy the health benef...
Source: World of Psychology - July 29, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Publishers Research Spirituality & Health dna Mind Body Connection Mind-Body Intervention Tai Chi Yoga Source Type: blogs

How Do US Vaccine Rates, Policies and Children ’s Health Compare to Other Countries?
Conclusion The US has the highest vaccination rate of all industrialized countries. US children are experiencing a health epidemic with more chronic diseases than ever before in our history. The US has the highest infant mortality in a study comparing America with 29 other developed countries. Children in the US suffered with more autism than in all other countries studied. Studies comparing vaccinated and unvaccinated show conclusively that unvaccinated children enjoy far superior health. Research and data demonstrate that vaccines cause neurological damage and contribute to significant health damage. Vaccines are a major...
Source: vactruth.com - July 29, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michelle Goldstein Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Recent Articles Top Picks autism truth about vaccines vaccine injuries Source Type: blogs

Physician Workforce Trends And Their Implications For Spending Growth
Controlling the growth rate of health care spending is central to the success of the Affordable Care Act or any subsequent reform. Because labor represents more than 50 percent of health care costs and the clinical workforce drives use and prices, the size and composition of the health care workforce has important ramifications for spending growth. We set out to understand the trends underlying the growth in the clinical workforce and their potential implications for health care spending, health policy, and health system design. A large literature establishes a link between primary care–oriented health systems and lo...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - July 28, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Christopher Barbey, Nikhil Sahni, Robert Kocher and Michael Chernew Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Health Professionals Organization and Delivery nurse practitioners physician’s assistants Primary Care Source Type: blogs

This EHR Mess We ’ re In
MICHAEL CHEN, MD Dr. Matthew Hahn blogs about the current state of today’s EHR’s and rightly points out many of the same reasons that I have identified in my previous posts: The negative impact of Meaningful Use (MU) since 2009 Poor usability of EHR’s There are several other important concerns that have been left unanswered by our current Health IT offerings. Patient privacy and control of their health records Interoperability Government Pipedream? The solution Dr. Hahn proposed is one that hinges on the hope that government will abandon MU (unlikely given this political climate), and create a w...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Tech EHR Michael Chen Open Source Source Type: blogs

The ABCs of Wheat Belly Baking
When we divorce ourselves from wheat, we lose the gluten and amylopectins that, when combined with yeast, generate the “rise” that gives wheat bread that light and airy texture, as well its stretchy, or “viscoelastic,” property. It means that we often struggle to create non-wheat breads that rise and are sturdy enough to make sandwich breads or buns. The rise generated by yeast just means that carbon dioxide (CO2) was generated by the metabolism of carbohydrates (amylopectin and amylose) by yeast, with gluten providing a “scaffold” for capturing CO2 gas. We can also generate CO2 by other...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 26, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle baking Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free low-carb Source Type: blogs

Competitors for survival signals maintains immune system balance
According to a new research published in the journal Immunity, 2 types of immune cells compete for any shared source of proteins that permit them to survive. The “contestants” are the lately discovered and ultra-rare innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and the abundant Big t cells: ILCs are more effective. Movie director of the Academy of Immunology plus Microbiology (AIM) in Institute intended for Basic Science (IBS), Charles G. Surh, led this international energy with researchers from La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and The Scripps Research Institute. These types of findings could promote our knowledge...
Source: My Irritable Bowel Syndrome Story - July 26, 2017 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Ken Tags: IBS News Source Type: blogs

The Failed MMR Vaccine Policies on College Campuses
Conclusions The current policy on most college campuses requires verification that incoming students have received two doses of the MMR vaccination. The goal of this policy is to prevent the diseases measles and mumps. A longstanding federal trial against Merck, the pharmaceutical company responsible for making the MMR vaccine, accuses Merck of manipulating data to show the MMR to be more effective against mumps than it is. Recent outbreaks of mumps on college campuses by students vaccinated with the MMR vaccine provides additional evidence that the MMR vaccine is ineffective. Data from the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting...
Source: vactruth.com - July 25, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michelle Goldstein Tags: Michelle Goldstein Top Stories college vaccination Mandatory Vaccination MMR vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs

A View of the Immunology of Age-Related Disease
In this open access paper, the authors present their view of the role of the immune system in age-related disease. Chronic inflammation is the primary focus of many considerations of immune aging, but there are arguably many other areas of disarray and dysfunction in the aging immune system that are just as relevant to the progression of age-related disease. Like other researchers, the authors here divide the complexity of immune aging into two broad categories: inflammaging, changes that increase chronic inflammation and inappropriate immune activation, and immunosenescence, changes that weaken the efforts of immune cells...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Most cases of pink eye (conjunctivitis) don ’t require antibiotics
If you or your child has ever had acute conjunctivitis or “pink eye,” you know how nasty it can be.  “Crusty,” “goopy,” “bloodshot,” “itchy,” and “gritty” are all common words used to describe the eye condition that affects some six million people in the US every year. What is conjunctivitis exactly? Conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva, which is the thin membrane that covers the whites of the eyes. There are three main types of conjunctivitis: allergic, viral, and bacterial. Allergic conjunctivitis often accompanies other allergy sy...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mallika Marshall, MD Tags: Cold and Flu Drugs and Supplements Eye Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 17th 2017
This study aimed to estimate associations between combined measurements of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with mortality and incident coronary artery disease (CAD). This study followed 130,473 UK Biobank participants aged 60-69 years (baseline 2006-2010) for 8.3 years (n = 2974 deaths). Current smokers and individuals with recent or disease-associated (e.g., from dementia, heart failure, or cancer) weight loss were excluded, yielding a "healthier agers" group. Ignoring WHR, the risk of mortality for overweight subjects was similar to that for normal-weight subjects. However, among normal-weight subjects...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 16, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 20-year-old male college student with a superficial skin infection
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 20-year-old male college student on the wrestling team is evaluated for a superficial skin infection. He has a history of several episodes of folliculitis and furunculosis over the past year that has required systemic treatment. His recurrent infections were treated with various oral antibiotics, including cephalexin, clindamycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. He currently takes no medications, has no drug allergies, and is otherwise in good health. On physical examination, vital signs are normal....
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Don ’t be impatient with your doctor
Fifteen minutes. This is the typical amount of time allotted for any single follow-up or acute type appointment in Primary Care. 30-minute spots are reserved for new or complicated appointments. Now, I just want that to sink in for a minute. I want everyone to sit down and think real hard for a moment, about how much they can get done in 15 minutes. How long does it take you to unload and load the dishwasher? How organized, nearby and accessible are your cabinets? If your house is like mine, half the cabinet doors have locks on them, so there’s that obstacle as well. Are all the dishes already rinsed off and in the s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/erin-olaughlin" rel="tag" > Erin O'Laughlin, DO < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 189
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the  189th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains  4 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Jus...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Emergency Medicine R&R in the FASTLANE Resuscitation EBM Education recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

LEAF Interviews Gary Hudson of Oisin Biotechnologies
Oisin Biotechnologies is developing a gene therapy approach to the clearance of senescent cells, and here I'll link to an interview with the CEO Gary Hudson conducted by the volunteers of the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation (LEAF). Oisin Biotechnologies is very much a company of our community: seed funded by the Methuselah Foundation and SENS Research Foundation, later angel investors drawn from the audience here, and headed by by one of the earliest supporters of the Methuselah Foundation and the SENS rejuvenation research programs. As regular readers will know, the accumulation of senescent cells is one of the root ca...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs