Orlando Health to start construction of downtown orthopedic hospital soon
Orlando Health aims to break ground in November on its future 350,000-square-foot, $295 million downtown orthopedic hospital and medical pavilion, Vice President of Asset Strategy Matt Taylor told Orlando Business Journal. The new 75-bed Orlando Health Jewett Orthopedic Hospital, medical pavilion, outpatient surgery center and 322,470-square-foot parking garage will be built at the southeast corner of Lucerne Terrace and Columbia Street. The project originally was slated to break ground in spring… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 19, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ryan Lynch Source Type: news

Orlando Health to start construction of downtown orthopedic hospital soon
Orlando Health aims to break ground in November on its future 350,000-square-foot, $295 million downtown orthopedic hospital and medical pavilion, Vice President of Asset Strategy Matt Taylor told Orlando Business Journal. The new 75-bed Orlando Health Jewett Orthopedic Hospital, medical pavilion, outpatient surgery center and 322,470-square-foot parking garage will be built at the southeast corner of Lucerne Terrace and Columbia Street. The project originally was slated to break ground in spring… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ryan Lynch Source Type: news

What is the Allergen Cross-Reactivity Rate of Legumes?
Discussion There are 8 common foods which compromise 90% of food allergens with those being peanuts, soybeans, cow’s milk, eggs, fish, crustacean/shellfish, wheat and tree nuts. Some people believe that lupin (a legume) is 9th. Legumes belong to the Fabaceae family. They provide protein, fat, vitamins other essential nutrients and therefore are used in the human diet throughout the world. “[A]llergenicity due to consumption of legumes in decreasing order may be peanut, soybean, lentil, chickpea, pea, mung bean and red gram.” Other common legumes include alfalfa, clovers, beans, lupins, mesquite, carob...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 14, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

👉 Alfalfa From Little Rascals Arrested After Overdose Report via Hvper.com
(Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A formative figure in the company's history: Roche Honorary Chairman Fritz Gerber dies at the age of 91
Basel, 11 Mai 2020- On May 10th 2020 Dr. h.c. Fritz Gerber died in his 92nd year. For more than two decades, he had shaped Roche's development into a leading global healthcare company in an exceptionally successful dual role as Group CEO (1978-1998) and Chairman of the Board (1978-2001). He remained closely associated with Roche throughout his life as Honorary Chairman. Starting at the end of the 1970s, Fritz Gerber led the company from a difficult situation to new success. Under his leadership, Roche's Group structures were fundamentally renewed and decentralized – ranging from focusing on the core businesses to mod...
Source: Roche Investor Update - May 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A formative figure in the company's history: Roche Honorary Chairman Fritz Gerber dies at the age of 91
Basel, 11 Mai 2020 - On May 10th 2020 Dr. h.c. Fritz Gerber died in his 92nd year. For more than two decades, he had shaped Roche's development into a leading global healthcare company in an exceptionally successful dual role as Group CEO (1978-1998) and Chairman of the Board (1978-2001). He remained closely associated with Roche throughout his life as Honorary Chairman. Starting at the end of the 1970s, Fritz Gerber led the company from a difficult situation to new success. Under his leadership, Roche's Group structures were fundamentally renewed and decentralized – ranging from focusing on the core businesses to mo...
Source: Roche Media News - May 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Orlando Health acquires local orthopedic firm, to build $250 million downtown hospital
Orlando Health is preparing to build a first-of-its kind hospital at its downtown campus. The $3.8 billion nonprofit health care system will break ground in late spring on the $250 million Orlando Health Jewett Orthopedic Hospital, after acquiring Jewett Orthopaedic Clinic for an undisclosed sum, the Orlando Sentinel reported. Orlando Health is expected to complete the up to 75-bed hos pital at the southeast corner of Lucerne Terrace and Columbia Street in 2023. “It’s not only an inpatient hospital… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 5, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ryan Lynch Source Type: news

Orlando Health acquires local orthopedic firm, to build $250 million downtown hospital
Orlando Health is preparing to build a first-of-its kind hospital at its downtown campus. The $3.8 billion nonprofit health care system will break ground in late spring on the $250 million Orlando Health Jewett Orthopedic Hospital, after acquiring Jewett Orthopaedic Clinic for an undisclosed sum, the Orlando Sentinel reported. Orlando Health is expected to complete the up to 75-bed hos pital at the southeast corner of Lucerne Terrace and Columbia Street in 2023. “It’s not only an inpatient hospital… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 4, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ryan Lynch Source Type: news

Swimmers Beware of Deep Brain Stimulation
The electronic implants reduced Parkinson ’s symptoms, but also erased some patients’ ability to swim. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Denise Grady Tags: Parkinson ' s Disease Medical Devices Brain Swimming Medtronic Inc Lucerne (Switzerland) Australia Abbott Laboratories Boston Scientific Corporation your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

How to Save the Colorado River from Climate Change and Chronic Overuse
Paul Kehmeier is a fourth-generation farmer from western Colorado. One hundred and twenty years ago, his great grandfather Wilhelm Kehmeier bought land in Delta County, dug an irrigation ditch to bring water from a nearby stream, and got to work planting. The Kehmeier family has been farming on the same land ever since, growing alfalfa, hay and oats. But a few years ago, Paul Kehmeier did something unusual: he decided not to water about 60% of his fields. He was one of a few dozen farmers and landowners in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico—the four states comprising the upper basin of the Colorado River— ...
Source: TIME: Science - September 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lucas Isakowitz Tags: Uncategorized climate change Environment Source Type: news

Competition to grow medical marijuana in Utah heats up
Candidates for the medical marijuana grower program in Utah include a longtime alfalfa farmer whose battle with cancer sparked an interest in cannabis and an ambitious hemp processor who lost his mother to an opioid addiction (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Honey bee colonies more successful by foraging on non-crop fields
(US Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service) Honey bee colonies foraging on land with a strong cover of clover species and alfalfa do more than three times as well than if they are put next to crop fields of sunflowers or canola, according to a study just published in Scientific Reports by an Agricultural Research Service scientist and his colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Here's why you should eat alfalfa microgreens, the "King of all Foods"
(Natural News) Small and unassuming, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) microgreens are chock-full of various vitamins, nutrients, and minerals. The alfalfa plant, which belongs to the legume family, is also considered an herb. While alfalfa is currently grown all over the world, it originally came from Central Asia and South Asia. People make use of its sprouts, leaves, and seeds.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

White House Nominates Entomologist to Lead USDA Research
President Trump has nominated Dr. Scott Hutchins, the Global Head of Integrated Field Sciences for Corteva Agriscience, the agriculture division of DowDuPont, for the top science role at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Hutchins is an entomologist with a background in insect management and crop protection. If confirmed by the Senate, he will oversee the Agricultural Research Service as the Undersecretary of Agriculture for Research, Education, and Economics. Hutchins has a Ph.D. in entomology from Iowa State University, where he studied the effect of insect-induced injury on alfalfa. Presently, he wor...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 24, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Alfalfa as human food: A rich source of nutrients, it is consumed as a tea, herb, supplement and now as flour
(Natural News) Could alfalfa concentrate help you meet your recommended daily intake (RDI) of various nutrients? According to a recent study, it most certainly can. A team of Romanian investigators has found this legume to be an exceptional source of minerals, proteins, and much more. Through laboratory analysis, the researchers were able to assess the nutritional... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Native Bees And Alfalfa Farmers — A Seedy Love Story
Northwest farmers produce a quarter of the country's alfalfa seeds, but they get help from millions of alkali bees, thanks to one of the most unique agricultural partnerships in the country.(Image credit: Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aaron Scott Source Type: news

River Valley Sprouts Recalls Alfalfa Sprouts and Garlic Alfalfa Sprouts Due to Possible Salmonella Contamination
River Valley Sprouts is voluntarily recalling its 5 ounce Alfalfa Sprouts, 4 ounce Alfalfa Sprouts, 5 ounce Garlic/Alfalfa and 5 ounce Variety sprouts because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail, elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illness such as arterial infections, endoca...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - March 17, 2018 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

High unemployment after childhood cancers
(Deutsches Aerzteblatt International) Survivors of childhood cancers are at higher risk of unemployment as adults. One-sixth of the former pediatric cancer patients is unemployed. This is the conclusion drawn from a systematic literature search by Mader and colleagues from the University of Lucerne in the current issue of Deutsches Ä rzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017; 114: 805-12). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a win
(American Society of Agronomy) In the U.S., alfalfa is grown mainly in western and northern states. The cold winters and other factors can lead to losses for farmers and forage shortages. Researchers have identified annual forage crops that can be cultivated in fields with winter-killed or terminated alfalfa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Manage the menopause naturally without HRT
This article helps you identify some simple changes you can make almost immediately which will help you manage the menopause naturally. Hot flushes and night sweats are common symptoms. Eighty percent of menopausal women experience them. Many women feel embarrassed about hot flushes, but it’s not as obvious to everyone else as it may seem to you! Symptoms can be reduced by eating lots of plant foods, especially those rich in phytoestrogens, which help to rebalance your hormones naturally. Phytoestrogens are found in abundance in soya products, legumes, and in brassica vegetables, such as cauliflower, broccoli, Brusse...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - November 20, 2017 Category: OBGYN Authors: Susie Kearley Tags: Alternatives to HRT healthy diet menopause Source Type: news

NIFA invests in programs to increase productivity, profitability, stewardship of 3 crops
(National Institute of Food and Agriculture) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced support for research to increase the productivity, profitability, and natural resources stewardship of canola, potato, and alfalfa production systems. The grants are funded through three NIFA programs: Alfalfa and Forage Research, Supplemental and Alternative Crops, and Potato Breeding Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rapid Medical launches Tigertriever registry study
Neurovascular device maker Rapid Medical said it launched a registry study of its Tigertreiver controllable stent retriever. The Israel-based company touts the Tigertriever as the only controllable, fully-visible stent retriever which can be adjusted by the physician to fit in the dimensions of the blocked blood vessel. The newly launched European multi-center registry study looks to enroll patients in France and Switzerland, and will be the 1st to examine the use of the Tigertriever in a real-life setting. The company said it has enrolled its 1st patient in the trial at Switzerland’s Cantonal Hospital of L...
Source: Mass Device - September 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Catheters Clinical Trials Stents rapidmedical Source Type: news

USDA announces $1.9 million for alfalfa and forage research
(National Institute of Food and Agriculture) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced the availability of $1.9 million in funding for research and development to improve the agricultural productivity, profitability, and conservation of the U.S. alfalfa forage industry. Funding is made through NIFA's Alfalfa and Forage Research Program (AFRP). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

13 ways to keep free radicals away, and why it's so important
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Sprouts Are Especially Good At Harboring Dangerous Bacteria
Sprouts may sound cute, but the tiny greens have sickened more than 2,500 people and caused 186 hospitalizations and three deaths in the past two decades, a new report finds. “Sprout contamination continues to pose a serious public health concern,” the researchers from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) wrote in their report. The arm of the FDA that wrote the new report focuses on investigating outbreaks and finding ways to prevent them. The findings on sprouts were presented on Oct. 28 at IDWeek 2016, a meeting in New Orleans of several organizations focused on infectious diseases. The report on sprouts ha...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why Sprouts Are Especially Good At Harboring Dangerous Bacteria
Sprouts may sound cute, but the tiny greens have sickened more than 2,500 people and caused 186 hospitalizations and three deaths in the past two decades, a new report finds. “Sprout contamination continues to pose a serious public health concern,” the researchers from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) wrote in their report. The arm of the FDA that wrote the new report focuses on investigating outbreaks and finding ways to prevent them. The findings on sprouts were presented on Oct. 28 at IDWeek 2016, a meeting in New Orleans of several organizations focused on infectious diseases. The report on sprouts ha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 'Juice' In Pre-Packaged Salad Greens May Encourage Salmonella Growth
When your unopened salad package starts collecting a clear liquid slime at the bottom of the bag, you might want to throw it out.  New stomach-turning research from the University of Leicester in England finds that this “salad juice” can help dangerous bacteria like salmonella cling to salad greens, potentially increasing consumers’ risk for food poisoning.  Microbiology researchers and study authors Primrose Freestone and Giannis Koukkidis explain in the video below that when juice from damaged leaves starts forming in a closed salad bag, it can encourage the salmonella bacterium to grow and st...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The 'Juice' In Pre-Packaged Salad Greens May Encourage Salmonella Growth
When your unopened salad package starts collecting a clear liquid slime at the bottom of the bag, you might want to throw it out.  New stomach-turning research from the University of Leicester in England finds that this “salad juice” can help dangerous bacteria like salmonella cling to salad greens, potentially increasing consumers’ risk for food poisoning.  Microbiology researchers and study authors Primrose Freestone and Giannis Koukkidis explain in the video below that when juice from damaged leaves starts forming in a closed salad bag, it can encourage the salmonella bacterium to grow and st...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This year, Roche and Lucerne Festival present the eighth Roche Commissions composition
The eighth ‘Roche Commission’, Trurliade – Zone Zero, a concerto for percussion and orchestra by Olga Neuwirth, will be premiered at the Culture and Convention Centre Lucerne (KKL Luzern) on Saturday 27 August as part of the Lucerne Summer Festival. (Source: Roche Media News)
Source: Roche Media News - August 25, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Salmonella outbreak in 9 states linked to alfalfa sprouts
An outbreak of salmonella probably caused by alfalfa sprouts has infected 30 people in nine states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday. Five people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here’s Another Case For Switching To A Vegetarian Diet
When it comes to the food we eat, there’s practically no such thing as a “guilt-free” diet — practically any food, unless you grow it yourself without using excessive pesticides or water, comes with nutritional, environmental or ethical consequences. But according to new research published last week in the Elementa journal, some diets fare far better than others when it comes to the important measure of how much agricultural land is required to produce the food they require. Specifically, diets that contained less meat tended to be far less land-dependent and, therefore, held the potential to feed a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Here’s Another Case For Switching To A Vegetarian Diet
When it comes to the food we eat, there’s practically no such thing as a “guilt-free” diet — practically any food, unless you grow it yourself without using excessive pesticides or water, comes with nutritional, environmental or ethical consequences. But according to new research published last week in the Elementa journal, some diets fare far better than others when it comes to the important measure of how much agricultural land is required to produce the food they require. Specifically, diets that contained less meat tended to be far less land-dependent and, therefore, held the potential to feed a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Alternative Treatments For Kidney Problems
There’s something you should know about chronic kidney disease. Most doctors will tell you there is no alternative treatments for kidney problems besides costly dialysis or a transplant to deal with impaired renal function. What Is Kidney Failure? Kidney dialysis is a treatment that uses a special machine to filter harmful wastes, salt and excess from your blood. But there is another option. It’s called stem cell biotherapy, and it offers new hope to those with this life-threatening disease. You may think your kidneys are just fine and you have nothing to worry about. But consider this… What Causes Kidn...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - June 16, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Health Source Type: news

The GMO Labeling Conundrum Made Simple!
I am a Holistic Nutritionist and passionate environmentalist, and I still get confused about the whole GMO labeling conundrum - and conundrum it most definitely is: As I write, there is a bill in the Senate (also known as the DARK Act) that, if passed, would eradicate states' rights to label GMOs and replace simple, legible on-package labels with QR codes. But first let's get back to the basics. What is a GMO (genetically modified organism) or a GE (genetically engineered) ingredient? Simply put, genetic engineering is removing the genetic material from one organism and inserting it into the permanent genetic code (DNA) ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Everything You Need To Know About Hawaii's Wildly Popular Poke Bowls
If you live in any major U.S. city, you've probably caught wind of the nation's new favorite food -- the poke bowl. Not "poke" like the always awkward Facebook feature, but "POH-keh" -- cubed raw fish, seasoned any way you want it. While it may seem like a new trend, this simple and addictive Hawaiian dish has been around for centuries. It's basically Hawaii's favorite food and for good reason: Poke is healthy, delicious and totally unique. A photo posted by Foodland Hawaii (@foodlandhi) on Apr 6, 2014 at 2:51pm PDT Walk into virtually any supermarket in the Aloha State and you'll find ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Is Going On With Glyphosate? EPA's Odd Handling of Controversial Chemical
The Environmental Protection Agency's ongoing risk assessment of the world's most widely used herbicide is starting to generate more questions than answers. On Monday, it also generated a giant "oops" from the EPA. On Friday, April 29, the EPA posted on its website a series of documents related to its long-awaited risk assessment for glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup herbicide and other weed-killing products sold around the world. The risk assessment started in 2009 and was supposed to conclude in 2015. But questions about whether or not glyphosate may cause cancer are dogging the agency's ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

CeQur looks to treble workforce in Massachusetts
CeQur is looking to treble the size of its workforce in Massachusetts with an expansion of the plant in Marlborough it plans to use to make the PaQ insulin device it hopes to launch this year. PaQ, a patch-like device, is designed to deliver both basal insulin and on-demand bolus insulin over 3 days. CeQur says it’s optimized the device for high-volume, low-cost manufacturing ahead of the planned commercialization of the 2nd generation this year. The 1st-generation PaQ device won CE Mark approval in the European Union in November 2012. CeQur, which is based in Marlborough and L...
Source: Mass Device - April 11, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Business/Financial News Diabetes Wall Street Beat CeQur SA Source Type: news

FDA Investigates Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Muenchen Linked to Alfalfa Sprouts Produced by Sweetwater Farms
The FDA, CDC, state and local officials are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Muenchen illnesses linked to alfalfa sprouts produced by Sweetwater Farms LLC, Inman, Kansas. The CDC reports that 13 people were infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Muenchen in four states: Kansas (5), Missouri (3), Oklahoma (3), and Pennsylvania (2). Five people have been hospitalized. Reported illness onset dates range from December 1, 2015 through January 21, 2016. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - March 2, 2016 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Jack and the Green Sprouts, Inc. is Voluntarily Recalling Alfalfa and Alfalfa Onion Sprouts
State health and agriculture officials are investigating an outbreak of food borne illness. Retailers and restaurants should not sell or serve alfalfa sprouts and consumers should not eat them at this time. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - February 29, 2016 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Multi-state E. coli outbreak linked to alfalfa sprouts
Nine people in Minnesota and Wisconsin have become ill from E. Coli, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday. Two of the individuals have been hospitalized. Alfalfa sprouts from Jack & The Green Sprouts in River Falls, Wiscons... (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - February 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E. coli outbreak linked to alfalfa sprouts
Nine people in Minnesota and Wisconsin have become ill from E. Coli, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday. Two of the individuals have been hospitalized. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Salmonella outbreak linked to alfalfa sprouts
Health officials urge consumers not to eat alfalfa sprouts produced by Sweetwater Farms at this time (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Alfalfa Sprouts: CDC
(Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Highlights: Feb. 24, 2016
Senate Confirms Califf to Lead FDA Judge Okays Fines for NYC Restaurants That Don't Post Salt Warnings Jury Awards $72 Million in Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder Case Alfalfa Sprouts Likely Cause of Salmonella Outbreak: CDC (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - February 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Highlights: Feb. 24, 2016
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Alfalfa Sprouts Likely Cause of Salmonella Outbreak: CDC A salmonella outbreak that has sickened 13 people in four states has been linked to... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 24, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Salmonella outbreak linked to alfalfa sprouts
Alfalfa sprouts are the likely source of a multistate salmonella outbreak that has caused 13 people to become ill, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - February 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Multistate salmonella outbreak linked to alfalfa sprouts
Alfalfa sprouts are the likely source of a multistate salmonella outbreak that has caused 13 people to become ill, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GMOs have been 'catastrophic' for US agricultural exports, says Canadian alfalfa exporter
(NaturalNews) Pandora's box is a disturbingly apt metaphor for the GMO industry. In the Greek myth, Pandora was tempted into opening a forbidden box which contained all the evils in the world. Once the box was opened and Pandora realized what she had done, she tried to close it, but... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How plants interact with beneficial microbes in the soil
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) A team of molecular biologists led by Dong Wang at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, working with the alfalfa-clover Medicago truncatula, has found how a gene in the host plant encodes a protein that recognizes the cell membrane surrounding the symbiotic bacteria, then directs other proteins to harvest the nutrients. Details appear online in the January edition of Nature Plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 12, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to Pass a Urine Drug Test Using Science
This article originally appeared on Inverse. By Yasmin Tayag Drug testing, like heroin, got popular in the late '80s and early '90s. As Reagan's Drug War rushed towards its logical conclusion, employers hustled to create drug-free work environments despite a lack of evidence that there was any advantage in it or that tests actually worked. Now, as the legalization movement gains momentum, tests to screen for marijuana use seem outrageous, but they remain relatively common. Plenty of businesses still require a piss test and plenty of would-be employees still struggle to pass. There are cleanses and adulterants that promise...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news