Tsetse fly genome reveals weaknesses: International 10-year project unravels biology of disease-causing fly
Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals. The tsetse fly spreads the parasitic diseases human African trypanosomiasis, known as sleeping sickness, and Nagana that infect humans and animals respectively. Throughout sub-Saharan Africa, 70 million people are currently at risk of deadly infection. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 24, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

A scourge of rural Africa, the tsetse fly is genetically deciphered
(Yale University) An international team of researchers led by the Yale School of Public Health has successfully sequenced the genetic code of the tsetse fly, opening the door to scientific breakthroughs that could reduce or end the scourge of African sleeping sickness in sub-Saharan Africa. The study is published in the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Live Q&A: funding drug development for diseases of poverty
It costs $5bn to develop a new drug, but drug resistance in developing countries means they are badly needed. Where will the money come from? Join our chat, Thursday 27 MarchIt takes a long time and many different processes to produce a drug. After being discovered it needs to be clinically tested, approved by regulatory agencies as being both effective and safe and then distributed to wherever it is needed.Predictably, most new drugs that are tested do not get through to the distribution stage. According to an article in Forbes in 2013, 95% of experimental drugs fail and subsequently the cost of developing a new drug has ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Anna Scott Tags: Global health Guardian Professional Infectious diseases Pharmaceuticals industry Malaria and infectious diseases Research Drugs Partnership Drug resistance Editorial Global development professionals network Participation Source Type: news

Africa: Sex Matters for Sleeping Sickness Microbes
[VOA]Scientists are keeping a close eye on the mating habits of microscopic organisms, including those that cause African sleeping sickness. They say what happens between two parasites can have major consequences for humans (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 10, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Sex matters for microbes
Caught in the act! Researchers from the University of Bristol have observed mating for the first time in the microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness.  This tropical disease is caused by trypanosomes, single-celled parasites that are found in the blood of those afflicted. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 3, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: news_text Tags: Press releases Source Type: news

Sex matters for microbes
(University of Bristol) Researchers from the University of Bristol have observed mating for the first time in the microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

According to the WHO, Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) affect over 1 billion people worldwide, and are devastating to patients in the developing world. What is being done to get treatments to these patients and to speed development of new treatments?
conversationsneglected tropical diseasestropical diseasesnew medicinesInnovationOpinion46864687468846894690469246914693Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) impact more than a billion people in some of the poorest, most remote parts of the world, blinding, disabling, disfiguring and sickening those infected. They have a negative impact on life expectancy, productivity and childhood education -- all of which create a cycle of poverty and stigma for affected communities. Today, because of renewed and new commitments, millions impacted by NTDs are being treated, several NTDs are being controlled effectively, and some even elimin...
Source: PHRMA - December 10, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Stephen Source Type: news

Sleeping sickness: a health scourge that refuses to be put to rest
African trypanosomiasis currently puts 70 million people at risk. Though control efforts have produced good results, there can be no elimination without wider health system reformsElimination of Human African Trypanosomiasis, sleeping sickness as it's commonly known, has been on the global health agenda for well over a decade (pdf). In 2001, when unprecedented amounts of drugs were donated by the French pharmaceutical company Aventis (now Sanofi), the global health community began to think disease elimination would become a reality yet the disease remains endemic in 36 sub-Saharan African countries today, putting some 70 m...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 5, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Charles Ebikeme Tags: Global health Blogposts Guardian Professional Infectious diseases Malaria and infectious diseases Health policy Society Drugs Global development professionals network World Health Organisation Policy and advocacy Source Type: news

Breaking new ground for drug discovery research in the fight against sleeping sickness
Scientists at the University of Oulu, Finland, and at the Helmholtz Center Berlin (HZB) have shown the way to new directions in drug development against African sleeping sickness and other tropical parasitic infections. This was based on the structural analysis of the enzyme thiolase, which plays a central role in lipid metabolism in the parasite that causes sleeping sickness. The researchers examined the biomolecule's structure at the MX beamline of electron storage ring, BESSY II, at the HZB... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Blocking the active site of thiolase
(Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie) Scientists at the University of Oulu, Finland, and at the HZB break new ground for drug discovery research in the fight against sleeping sicknessScientists at the University of Oulu, Finland, and at the Helmholtz Center Berlin have shown the way to new directions in drug development against African sleeping sickness and other tropical parasitic infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

An end to the deadly disease of sleeping sickness?
A tag team of two bacteria, one of them genetically modified, has a good chance to reduce or even eliminate the deadly disease African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, researchers at Oregon State University conclude in a recent mathematical modeling study. African trypanosomiasis, caused by a parasite carried by the tsetse fly, infects 30,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa each year and is almost always fatal without treatment. In a 2008 epidemic, 48,000 people died... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Innovative approach could ultimately end deadly disease of sleeping sickness
(Oregon State University) A tag team of two bacteria, one of them genetically modified, has a good chance to reduce or even eliminate the deadly disease African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, researchers at Oregon State University conclude in a recent mathematical modeling study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Designing Novel Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei
Computational simulations of essential biological systems in pathogenic organisms are increasingly being used to reveal structural and dynamical features for targets of interest. At the same time, increased research efforts, especially from academia, have been directed toward drug discovery for neglected tropical diseases. Although these diseases cripple large populations in less fortunate parts of the world, either very few new drugs are being developed or the available treatments for them have severe side effects, including death. This chapter walks readers through a computational investigation used to find novel inhibit...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Pharmacology/Toxicology - April 13, 2013 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Screening Method Created To Expedite The Development Of New Drugs In The Fight Against Tropical Diseases
A novel tool exploits baker's yeast to expedite the development of new drugs to fight multiple tropical diseases, including malaria, schistosomiasis, and African sleeping sickness. The unique screening method uses yeasts which have been genetically engineered to express parasite and human proteins to identify chemical compounds that target disease-causing parasites but do not affect their human hosts. Parasitic diseases affect millions of people annually, often in the most deprived parts of the world... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news