Africa: Togo is First African Country to End Sleeping Sickness as a Public Health Problem
[WHO] Brazzaville -- Togo has received validation from the World Health Organization (WHO) for having eliminated human African trypanosomiasis or "sleeping sickness" as a public health problem, becoming the first country in Africa to reach this milestone. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 27, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Ute Hellmich receives Exploration Grant for research into membrane proteins of parasites
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Professor Ute Hellmich of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has launched a new research project investigating essential membrane proteins of parasites, some of which can cause a neglected tropical disease (NTD) such as African sleeping sickness and Chagas disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 4, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Clemson researchers ID protein function in parasites that cause sometimes fatal diseases
(Clemson University) In the quest to develop more effective treatments for parasitic diseases, scientists look for weaknesses in the organisms' molecular machinery. A team of College of Science researchers at Clemson recently contributed to that understanding by discovering the function of a specific protein in the three related parasites that cause African sleeping sickness, Chagas disease and Leishmaniasis -- diseases that are sometimes fatal and afflict millions worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yale researchers identify protein that could help neutralize deadly bite of the tsetse fly
(Yale School of Public Health) Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have identified a family of surface proteins that could be promising new vaccine candidates to help control African sleeping sickness, a devastating disease passed on by the bite of infected tsetse flies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insight into the neglected tropical disease sleeping sickness
(Lancaster University) Researchers have shed light on how the parasite which causes sleeping sickness multiples inside its host. Human African Trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, only occurs in Sub-Saharan Africa where an estimated 60 million people in 36 countries are at risk. The infection attacks the central nervous system and is fatal without treatment. Lancaster University researchers have found that the parasite's cell division differs from that of humans and animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists identify a key gene in the transmission of deadly African sleeping sickness
Life scientists from UCLA and the University of Bern have identified a key gene in the transmission of African sleeping sickness — a severe disease transmitted by the bite of infected tsetse flies, which are common in sub-Saharan Africa.The disease is fatal if untreated, as the parasite responsible moves from the bloodstream to the central nervous system. Tens of millions of people in 36 African countries are at risk. There is no vaccine, and conventional drug treatments, which include an arsenic derivative, are antiquated, not very effective and have severe side effects.The research,  published in the journal Nature Co...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers engineer a cost-effective treatment for neglected tropical disease
(University of Tokyo) Researchers have turned a fungus into a disease-curing factory through modern genetic engineering and patience. The natural antibiotic is a promising cure for a neglected tropical disease called human African trypanosomiasis, or African sleeping sickness, that infects thousands of people in remote, rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness. Fundamental research undertaken under the supervision of Professor Ute Hellmich of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has revealed a promising strategy to develop a suitable agent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

East Africa: And Now, a New Drug for Sleeping Sickness
[East African] Scientists working on Neglected Tropical Diseases have welcomed the approval of a new drug for the treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis, commonly known as sleeping sickness. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 29, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Clemson researchers reveal secrets of parasite that causes African sleeping sickness
(Clemson University) A team of Clemson University researchers wants to protect humans and other mammals from the debilitating and even deadly effects of African sleeping sickness. James Morris, a Clemson professor in the College of Science's department of genetics and biochemistry, said that studying the cause of the disease is vital because, although the transmission of African sleeping sickness by tsetse flies has been studied for more than 100 years, the secret to the underlying parasite's success remains largely a mystery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 20, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

EMA Panel Backs First Oral-Only Drug for Deadly Disease EMA Panel Backs First Oral-Only Drug for Deadly Disease
Fexinidazole is for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in adults and children aged 6 years and older.International Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Alert Source Type: news

' Tiny Targets' Aid in Fighting African Sleeping Sickness
(MedPage Today) -- Low-tech devices slash tsetse fly populations in Congo (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - November 1, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Stopping a tiny -- and deadly -- fly in its tracks
(Brigham Young University) New research presents a technique that could help treat African sleeping sickness, which impacts millions in sub-Saharan Africa and -- in its late stages -- can be fatal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Discovery of a potential therapeutic target to combat trypanosomes
(CNRS) Using cryo-electron microscopy, French researchers at the Institut de Biologie Mol é culaire et Cellulaire (CNRS/Universit é de Strasbourg) have analyzed the structure of trypanosomes parasites in details and revealed one of their potential weak points, which has remained undetected until now. This discovery opens the path to the development of new safer therapies that are less toxic and more specific against trypanosomes, the parasites causing the Chagas disease and the African sleeping sickness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genomic screening helps doctors target girl's cancer
(Medical University of South Carolina) Two-year-old Victoria Thompson is part of the national precision medicine trial Peds PLAN through MUSC Children's Health for children with high-risk neuroblastoma. She's also receiving DFMO, a drug normally used to treat African sleeping sickness that may help keep high-risk neuroblastoma that's in remission from recurring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news