“ I Was Blind, But Now I See ” – Celebrating Malawi’s Progress on World NTD Day
Vainesi, a former trachoma trichiasis patient, cheers in celebration knowing that trachoma has been eliminated in Malawi. Vainesi had suffered with the pain caused by trachoma for 10 years before a local disability mobiliser encouraged her to go to the hospital for treatment. By Lazarus McCarthy ChakweraLILONGWE, Jan 30 2023 (IPS) “I was blind, but now I see.” This is what Vainesi, from Salima District in Central Malawi, said after surgery to treat trachoma. A mother of three, Vainesi had been unable to work or provide for her family once the disease began to affect her eyesight. Vainesi is one of millions of Malawians...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 30, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Lazarus McCarthy Chakwera Tags: Africa Development & Aid Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news

Will a One-Dose Drug Mean the End of Sleeping Sickness? Will a One-Dose Drug Mean the End of Sleeping Sickness?
A single oral dose of acoziborole proved effective for human African trypanosomiasis in a clinical trial. The drug has potential to greatly simplify and expand treatment for sleeping sickness.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - November 30, 2022 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Stronger Healthcare Systems Critical for Africa ’s Socioeconomic Transformation
As Africa rebuilds following the pandemic, investment in the fight against malaria and NTDs will make healthcare systems more resilient and support longer-term pandemic preparedness. Credit: UNDP Kenya/James OchweriBy Claude Mambo MuvunyiKIGALI, Jun 22 2022 (IPS) Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare systems globally have battled to deal with the repercussions unleashed by the disease. From the outset, Africa was considered particularly vulnerable due to several factors: limited healthcare provision in some areas, high prevalence of HIV and TB in a number of countries, and limited fiscal room to respond t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 22, 2022 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Claude Mambo Muvunyi Tags: Africa Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Doctors Treat Girl's Genetic Disorder with Repurposed Drug
In just 16 months, physicians went from identifying a novel rare disease in three-year-old Marley to successfully treating her with a drug previously used to treat African sleeping sickness and... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 1, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Notebook Magazine Issue Source Type: news

FDA Approves Fexinidazole as the First All-Oral Treatment for Sleeping Sickness
July 19, 2021 -- The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved fexinidazole as the first all-oral treatment for both stages of the Trypanosoma brucei gambiense form of sleeping sickness (Human African trypanosomiasis) in patients 6 years of... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - July 19, 2021 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Vaccine target for devastating livestock disease could change lives of millions
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The first ever vaccine target for trypanosomes, a family of parasites that cause devastating disease in animals and humans, has been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute. By targeting a protein on the cell surface of the parasite Trypanosoma vivax, researchers were able to confer long-lasting protection against animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) infection in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 27, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sex cells in parasites are doing their own thing
(University of Bristol) Researchers at the University of Bristol have discovered how microbes responsible for human African sleeping sickness produce sex cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 11, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sex cells in parasites are doing their own thing
Researchers at the University of Bristol have discovered how microbes responsible for human African sleeping sickness produce sex cells. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 13, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Cote d'Ivoire: WHO Validates Cote d'Ivoire for Eliminating Sleeping Sickness As a Public Health Problem
[WHO] C ôte d'Ivoire has successfully eliminated human African trypanosomiasis, also known as "sleeping sickness", as a public health problem, becoming the second African country after Togo to be validated by the World Health Organization (WHO). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 6, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Togo overcomes ‘sleeping sickness’ as a public health problem
The West African nation of Togo has eliminated human African trypanosomiasis or “sleeping sickness” as a public health problem, becoming the first in the continent to achieve the milestone, the UN World Health Organization (WHO) has said.  (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - August 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Africa: Togo is First African Country to End Sleeping Sickness as a Public Health Problem
[WHO] Brazzaville -- Togo has received validation from the World Health Organization (WHO) for having eliminated human African trypanosomiasis or "sleeping sickness" as a public health problem, becoming the first country in Africa to reach this milestone. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 27, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Ute Hellmich receives Exploration Grant for research into membrane proteins of parasites
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Professor Ute Hellmich of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has launched a new research project investigating essential membrane proteins of parasites, some of which can cause a neglected tropical disease (NTD) such as African sleeping sickness and Chagas disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 4, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Clemson researchers ID protein function in parasites that cause sometimes fatal diseases
(Clemson University) In the quest to develop more effective treatments for parasitic diseases, scientists look for weaknesses in the organisms' molecular machinery. A team of College of Science researchers at Clemson recently contributed to that understanding by discovering the function of a specific protein in the three related parasites that cause African sleeping sickness, Chagas disease and Leishmaniasis -- diseases that are sometimes fatal and afflict millions worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yale researchers identify protein that could help neutralize deadly bite of the tsetse fly
(Yale School of Public Health) Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have identified a family of surface proteins that could be promising new vaccine candidates to help control African sleeping sickness, a devastating disease passed on by the bite of infected tsetse flies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insight into the neglected tropical disease sleeping sickness
(Lancaster University) Researchers have shed light on how the parasite which causes sleeping sickness multiples inside its host. Human African Trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, only occurs in Sub-Saharan Africa where an estimated 60 million people in 36 countries are at risk. The infection attacks the central nervous system and is fatal without treatment. Lancaster University researchers have found that the parasite's cell division differs from that of humans and animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news