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News from the pathogen that causes sleeping sickness
(University of W ü rzburg) A team of researchers from the University of W ü rzburg has discovered an interesting enzyme in the pathogens responsible for African sleeping sickness: It could be a promising target for drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers studying century-old drug in potential new approach to autism
(University of California - San Diego) In a small, randomized Phase I/II clinical trial (SAT1), researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say a 100-year-old drug called suramin, originally developed to treat African sleeping sickness, was safely administered to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who subsequently displayed measurable, but transient, improvement in core symptoms of autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Merck partners with University of California, San Diego (UCSD) to fight Neglected Tropical Diseases
Merck, a leading science and technology company, today announced that it has agreed with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) to share compounds under the WIPO Re:Search open innovation umbrella, thereby deepening its efforts in the fight against Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) to identify potential cures for leishmaniasis, Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) and human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness). (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Merck Group Business and Industry Source Type: news

Scientists effectively disrupt communication between parasites that spread disease
A new intervention to tamper with parasites'communication system may lead to the development of drugs to treat, and prevent the spread of, devastating diseases such as African sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis and Chagas'disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

This Man Went Abroad And Brought Back A Disease U.S. Doctors Had Never Seen
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. Lying in a hospital bed at the State Department medical unit in Washington, D.C., Claude Reece suspected he might have contracted malaria. It was 1995 and the American was sent back to the U.S. after coming down with a fever, sweats, pounding stomach aches and headaches, while on his first assignment working as a USAID country desk officer for Chad. “I felt that whatever ailment I contracted could be treated by the Medical Unit,” Reece told The Huffington Post ― that...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

This Man Went Abroad And Brought Back A Disease U.S. Doctors Had Never Seen
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. Lying in a hospital bed at the State Department medical unit in Washington, D.C., Claude Reece suspected he might have contracted malaria. It was 1995 and the American was sent back to the U.S. after coming down with a fever, sweats, pounding stomach aches and headaches, while on his first assignment working as a USAID country desk officer for Chad. “I felt that whatever ailment I contracted could be treated by the Medical Unit,” Reece told The Huffington Post ― that...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Disease Detectives Unearthed A Forgotten Drug To Fight A Lethal Illness
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. One morning a few years ago, a vial containing just a few drops of a long-forgotten drug candidate arrived at the office of bioengineer Els Torreele in Switzerland.  The compound, fexinidazole, had been studied at a drug company several decades earlier, but researchers had given up on it for no clear reason. Torreele had asked the company to unearth whatever it had left from its archive, hoping to get her hands on the final clue in a long process of painstaking detectiv...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Doctor Gave Up His Shot At A Cushy Career To Cure A Little Known-Disease
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. His name was Tendayi. He had watched five of his nine children die. Yet when he was diagnosed with a serious disease, he steadfastly held onto his will to live ― until he just couldn’t anymore.   Tendayi died about a decade ago, but his picture still sits on Dr. Wilfried Mutombo’s desk in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo. It reminds him daily that a terrifying ― yet treatable ― disease is still killing far too many people. Muto...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: New Finding Offers Breakthrough in Beating Sleeping Sickness
[The Conversation Africa] African sleeping sickness is a deadly disease spread by the bite of the tsetse fly, which only lives in sub-Saharan Africa. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 22, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New drug for tropical disease Trypanosomiasis discovered
Researchers are working to find the fastest way possible to treat and cure human African trypanosomiasis, long referred to as sleeping sickness. Human African trypanosomiasis, or HAT, is a tropical disease endemic to some rural communities in sub-Saharan Africa. A vector-borne parasitic disease, existing diagnosis and treatment regimens are complex, especially challenging in some of the world's most poverty-stricken regions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

UGA researchers discover a drug for a tropical disease
(University of Georgia) Researchers at the University of Georgia are working to find the fastest way possible to treat and cure human African trypanosomiasis, long referred to as sleeping sickness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 30, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New research reveals single class of drug could treat three neglected diseases
New research conducted by scientists from the University of York and Novartis has revealed that one drug might be able to treat three fatal and usually neglected parasitic diseases, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis, als … (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - August 9, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Discovery of enzyme in the sleeping sickness parasite streamlines drug development
The single-celled parasite causing African sleeping sickness has a defense mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals under development against the disease, new research indicates. The deadly parasite has an enzyme that can cleave and hence disarm adenosine analogue pharmaceuticals. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Discovery of enzyme in the sleeping sickness parasite streamlines drug development
(Umea University) Researchers from Umeå University in Sweden have discovered that the single-celled parasite causing African sleeping sickness has a defense mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals under development against the disease. The deadly parasite has an enzyme that can cleave and hence disarm adenosine analogue pharmaceuticals. This according to a study recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Nitric oxide protects against parasite invasion and brain inflammation by keeping the blood brain barrier intact
(PLOS) African trypanosomiasis is called 'sleeping sickness' because when the infection is untreated, trypanosome parasites will invade the brain and cause disruption of sleeping patterns and irreversible neurological damage. A study published on Feb. 25 in PLOS Pathogens reports that in a mouse model of trypanosome disease, nitric oxide plays an unexpected role in preserving the integrity of the blood brain barrier, thereby reducing parasite invasion into the brain, and likely limiting neurological damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 25, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists 'artificially evolve' sleeping sickness bacterium
Scientists are trying to artificially evolve a bacterium linked to the spread of deadly sleeping sickness, African Trypanosomiasis. They aim to better understand the genomics of Sodalis glossinidius, a bacteria which, when present in the gut, allows the Tsetse fly to become a carrier of the parasitic disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rapid 'dipstick' test tackles fatal sleeping sickness
(Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council) Scientists have developed a quick and simple diagnosis method, similar to a dipstick pregnancy test, to fight a deadly sleeping sickness. The test to diagnose Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) just requires a pin-prick blood sample and will remove the need to take complex equipment into remote areas of sub-Saharan Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 15, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

African sleeping sickness: Study suggests new way to help the immune system fight off parasite
African sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is transmitted by the tsetse fly and is fatal if left untreated. New research reveals a method to manipulate trypanosomes in the mammalian bloodstream to acquire fly stage characteristics. The findings suggest that inhibiting specific proteins can 'trick' the parasite into differentiating to a different stage of its lifecycle. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study suggests new way to help the immune system fight off sleeping sickness parasite
There are currently few treatments for the disease, and those that exist have substantial side effects. A new study reveals a method, involving epigenetic mechanisms, that causes the African sleeping sickness parasite to change into a new state, potentially making it easier for the host immune system to eliminate it. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - December 8, 2015 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: pubaff Tags: Science News African sleeping sickness chromatin F. Nina Papavasiliou Günter Blobel immunology Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology parasitic infection small-molecule inhibitors Virology and Microbiology Source Type: news

Study suggests new way to help the immune system fight off sleeping sickness parasite
(Rockefeller University) There are currently few treatments for African sleeping sickness, and those that exist have substantial side effects. A new study reveals a method, involving epigenetic mechanisms, that causes the African sleeping sickness parasite to change into a state that potentially makes it easier for the host immune system to eliminate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 8, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

To survive, a parasite mixes and matches its disguises, study suggests
A detailed look at the African sleeping sickness parasite’s strategy for evading its hosts’ immune systems revealed that the blood parasites assume a surprising diversity of protein coat disguises. In fact, the number of disguises necessary to maintain a long-term infection appears to exceed the functional genes that encode them. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 26, 2015 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: pubaff Tags: Science News antigenic variation F. Nina Papavasiliou George Cross Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology Monical Mugnier parasitic infection sleeping sickness Trypanosoma brucei VSG Source Type: news

8 Rare 'House, M.D.' Cases That Can Actually Happen (And How To Avoid Them)
"House, M.D.," starring Hugh Laurie as a pill-popping genius, was conceived as the medical version of "Sherlock Holmes" and ran for eight seasons on Fox. Sunday, Nov. 16, marked the 10-year anniversary of the premiere. Though it's easy to look back on the show and focus on some of the unbelievable details of the cases, it might surprise you to learn that "House" was actually much more realistic than you thought. Yeah, the odds of all these rare medical cases coming to one hospital in New Jersey are pretty slim, but a variety of sources -- including Andrew Holtz, former CNN Medical Corresponde...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 17, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

New hope for drug discovery in African sleeping sickness
African sleeping sickness, the neglected trop­ical dis­ease, affects tens of thou­sands of people and is mostly fatal. Now, new research has iden­ti­fied hun­dreds of chem­ical com­pounds that could lead to a cure. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 25, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

New hope for drug discovery in African sleeping sickness
(Northeastern University) The neglected trop­ical dis­ease affects tens of thou­sands of people and is mostly fatal. Now, new research co-​​authored by North­eastern chem­istry pro­fessor Michael Pol­lastri has iden­ti­fied hun­dreds of chem­ical com­pounds that could lead to a cure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Eradicating fatal sleeping sickness by killing off the tsetse fly
A professor of biology has lent his expertise in understanding insect movement to help shape a UN-sanctioned eradication effort of the tsetse fly -- a creature that passes the fatal African sleeping sickness to humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. The tsetse fly is the main vector for Human African Trypanosomiasis (aka sleeping sickness), and spreads the disease by biting humans or animals. The disease affects the central nervous system and is fatal if untreated. For some forms of the disease, victims can reach the terminal stage before symptoms even start to show. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 17, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Eradicating fatal sleeping sickness by killing off the tsetse fly
(Brigham Young University) Steven L. Peck, a BYU professor of biology, has lent his expertise in understanding insect movement to help shape a UN-sanctioned eradication effort of the tsetse fly -- a creature that passes the fatal African sleeping sickness to humans, domestic animals, and wildlife.Results of the effort appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Africa: Genome Breakthrough Could Help Fight Against Sleeping Sickness
[IRIN]Kisumu/Nairobi -Scientists have welcomed the development of genome sequence data on the tsetse fly, the vector responsible for the transmission of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), commonly known as sleeping sickness. They say it could be instrumental in devising strategies to eradicate the fly and reduce deaths and the spread of other diseases associated with it. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 29, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Africa: Research Breakthrough Could Cut Sleeping Sickness
[Yale University]New Haven -An international team of researchers led by the Yale School of Public Health has successfully sequenced the genetic code of the tsetse fly, opening the door to scientific breakthroughs that could reduce or end the scourge of African sleeping sickness in sub-Saharan Africa. The study is published in the journal Science. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 25, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Tsetse fly genome reveals weaknesses: International 10-year project unravels biology of disease-causing fly
Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals. The tsetse fly spreads the parasitic diseases human African trypanosomiasis, known as sleeping sickness, and Nagana that infect humans and animals respectively. Throughout sub-Saharan Africa, 70 million people are currently at risk of deadly infection. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 24, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

A scourge of rural Africa, the tsetse fly is genetically deciphered
(Yale University) An international team of researchers led by the Yale School of Public Health has successfully sequenced the genetic code of the tsetse fly, opening the door to scientific breakthroughs that could reduce or end the scourge of African sleeping sickness in sub-Saharan Africa. The study is published in the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Live Q&A: funding drug development for diseases of poverty
It costs $5bn to develop a new drug, but drug resistance in developing countries means they are badly needed. Where will the money come from? Join our chat, Thursday 27 MarchIt takes a long time and many different processes to produce a drug. After being discovered it needs to be clinically tested, approved by regulatory agencies as being both effective and safe and then distributed to wherever it is needed.Predictably, most new drugs that are tested do not get through to the distribution stage. According to an article in Forbes in 2013, 95% of experimental drugs fail and subsequently the cost of developing a new drug has ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Anna Scott Tags: Global health Guardian Professional Infectious diseases Pharmaceuticals industry Malaria and infectious diseases Research Drugs Partnership Drug resistance Editorial Global development professionals network Participation Source Type: news

Africa: Sex Matters for Sleeping Sickness Microbes
[VOA]Scientists are keeping a close eye on the mating habits of microscopic organisms, including those that cause African sleeping sickness. They say what happens between two parasites can have major consequences for humans (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 10, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Sex matters for microbes
Caught in the act! Researchers from the University of Bristol have observed mating for the first time in the microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness.  This tropical disease is caused by trypanosomes, single-celled parasites that are found in the blood of those afflicted. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 3, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: news_text Tags: Press releases Source Type: news

Sex matters for microbes
(University of Bristol) Researchers from the University of Bristol have observed mating for the first time in the microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

According to the WHO, Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) affect over 1 billion people worldwide, and are devastating to patients in the developing world. What is being done to get treatments to these patients and to speed development of new treatments?
conversationsneglected tropical diseasestropical diseasesnew medicinesInnovationOpinion46864687468846894690469246914693Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) impact more than a billion people in some of the poorest, most remote parts of the world, blinding, disabling, disfiguring and sickening those infected. They have a negative impact on life expectancy, productivity and childhood education -- all of which create a cycle of poverty and stigma for affected communities. Today, because of renewed and new commitments, millions impacted by NTDs are being treated, several NTDs are being controlled effectively, and some even elimin...
Source: PHRMA - December 10, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Stephen Source Type: news

Sleeping sickness: a health scourge that refuses to be put to rest
African trypanosomiasis currently puts 70 million people at risk. Though control efforts have produced good results, there can be no elimination without wider health system reformsElimination of Human African Trypanosomiasis, sleeping sickness as it's commonly known, has been on the global health agenda for well over a decade (pdf). In 2001, when unprecedented amounts of drugs were donated by the French pharmaceutical company Aventis (now Sanofi), the global health community began to think disease elimination would become a reality yet the disease remains endemic in 36 sub-Saharan African countries today, putting some 70 m...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 5, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Charles Ebikeme Tags: Global health Blogposts Guardian Professional Infectious diseases Malaria and infectious diseases Health policy Society Drugs Global development professionals network World Health Organisation Policy and advocacy Source Type: news

Breaking new ground for drug discovery research in the fight against sleeping sickness
Scientists at the University of Oulu, Finland, and at the Helmholtz Center Berlin (HZB) have shown the way to new directions in drug development against African sleeping sickness and other tropical parasitic infections. This was based on the structural analysis of the enzyme thiolase, which plays a central role in lipid metabolism in the parasite that causes sleeping sickness. The researchers examined the biomolecule's structure at the MX beamline of electron storage ring, BESSY II, at the HZB... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Blocking the active site of thiolase
(Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie) Scientists at the University of Oulu, Finland, and at the HZB break new ground for drug discovery research in the fight against sleeping sicknessScientists at the University of Oulu, Finland, and at the Helmholtz Center Berlin have shown the way to new directions in drug development against African sleeping sickness and other tropical parasitic infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

An end to the deadly disease of sleeping sickness?
A tag team of two bacteria, one of them genetically modified, has a good chance to reduce or even eliminate the deadly disease African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, researchers at Oregon State University conclude in a recent mathematical modeling study. African trypanosomiasis, caused by a parasite carried by the tsetse fly, infects 30,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa each year and is almost always fatal without treatment. In a 2008 epidemic, 48,000 people died... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Innovative approach could ultimately end deadly disease of sleeping sickness
(Oregon State University) A tag team of two bacteria, one of them genetically modified, has a good chance to reduce or even eliminate the deadly disease African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, researchers at Oregon State University conclude in a recent mathematical modeling study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Designing Novel Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei
Computational simulations of essential biological systems in pathogenic organisms are increasingly being used to reveal structural and dynamical features for targets of interest. At the same time, increased research efforts, especially from academia, have been directed toward drug discovery for neglected tropical diseases. Although these diseases cripple large populations in less fortunate parts of the world, either very few new drugs are being developed or the available treatments for them have severe side effects, including death. This chapter walks readers through a computational investigation used to find novel inhibit...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Pharmacology/Toxicology - April 13, 2013 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Screening Method Created To Expedite The Development Of New Drugs In The Fight Against Tropical Diseases
A novel tool exploits baker's yeast to expedite the development of new drugs to fight multiple tropical diseases, including malaria, schistosomiasis, and African sleeping sickness. The unique screening method uses yeasts which have been genetically engineered to express parasite and human proteins to identify chemical compounds that target disease-causing parasites but do not affect their human hosts. Parasitic diseases affect millions of people annually, often in the most deprived parts of the world... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

U.S. Cuts to Global Health Budget “Mass-scale Malpractice”
Public health workers, activists and policymakers are stepping up a last-minute campaign to highlight the global health impact of historic, sweeping cuts to the U.S. federal budget due to go into effect Friday if Congress doesn’t act. While some are suggesting that the automatic reductions, known here as the “sequester”, could set back health-related research and outcomes by a generation, others are warning that NGOs and project implementers, long working on the assumption that the cutbacks would be averted, are now finding themselves massively underprepared for how to operate on slashed budgets. “W...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 26, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Carey L. Biron Tags: Active Citizens Aid Development & Aid Financial Crisis Headlines Health North America Poverty & MDGs Women's Health World HIV/AIDS sequester United States Source Type: news

Neglected tropical diseases: mapping occurrence and tracking control
Mobile and mapping technologies can play a key role in controlling NTDs, but more effort is required to put them into the hands of frontline workersGPS-enabled smart phones, satnavs and Google maps provide a wealth of data on geographical locations and the things we are interested in. Such geographical richness is not readily available to programmes that tackle neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) – a group of chronic and disabling diseases that mainly occur in the tropics.The recent Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study estimated that NTDs account for only 1% of disability-adjusted life years worldwide. This aggregate ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 30, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Blogposts Guardian Professional Infectious diseases Malaria and infectious diseases Health Society Global development professionals network Science Source Type: news

Discovery May Lead To New Treatments For Deadly Sleeping Sickness
While its common name may make it sound almost whimsical, sleeping sickness, or African trypanosomiasis, is in reality a potentially fatal parasitic infection that has ravaged populations in sub-Saharan Africa for decades, and it continues to infect thousands of people every year. Few drugs have been developed to treat sleeping sickness since the 1940s, and those still in use are highly toxic, sometimes causing painful side effects and even death... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Mathematical Model Suggests Wild Animals May Contribute To The Resurgence Of African Sleeping Sickness
Wild animals may be a key contributor to the continuing spread of African sleeping sickness, new research published in PLOS Computational Biology shows. The West African form of the disease, also known as Gambiense Human African trypanosomiasis, affects around 10,000 people in Africa every year and is deadly if left untreated... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Wild animals may contribute to the resurgence of African sleeping sickness
Wild animals may be a key contributor to the continuing spread of African sleeping sickness, new research shows. The West African form of the disease, also known as Gambiense Human African trypanosomiasis, affects around 10,000 people in Africa every year and is deadly if left untreated. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 17, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news