Endoscopic Fundoplication Goes Forward: Medigus MUSE System for GERD Cleared in U.S.
Medigus (Omer, Israel) received FDA clearance for the latest version of its minimally invasive GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) treatment system. The MUSE, known as the SRS System in its previous incarnation, allows a physician to perform an anterior fundoplication using one instrument that includes a stapler, video camera, and ultrasonic sights that help with alignment. Fundoplication normally involves opening the abdominal wall or less invasively with laparoscopic instruments. The MUSE system allows the procedure to be done endoscopically, restoring the functionality of the esophageal valve with just a fe...
Source: Medgadget - March 25, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: GI Surgery Source Type: blogs

Studies Prove Without Doubt That Unvaccinated Children Are Far Healthier Than Their Vaccinated Peers
Conclusion I find it amazing that despite mainstream media and leading government agencies stressing repeatedly that studies comparing vaccinated children to unvaccinated children cannot take place for ethical reasons, groups around the world are taking it upon themselves to do these studies anyway. While surveys of this kind are often dismissed as being purely epidemiological and passed off as little more than stamp collecting, I believe that studies of this nature should not be dismissed out of hand. After all, many stamp collections contain just one stamp that is worth far more than its weight in gold. These studies sho...
Source: vactruth.com - February 26, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories truth about vaccines vaccinated vs. unvaccinated Vaccine Safety Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Rise and shine, everyone, another busy day is on the way. And while this is shaping up to be a rather cold one, in fact, the sun is shining strongly over the hectic Pharmalot corporate campus, where the short people are enduring their usual ritual of hustling off to their houses of learning. As for us, we are, of course, indulging with a cup of needed stimulation as we sort through our to-do list and decide what to leave in and what to leave out. Perhaps you can relate. In any event, here are some items of interest to help along your own ride. Have a smashing day and drop us a line if something interesting occurs... CVS An...
Source: Pharmalot - December 11, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly holiday recipes II
Now for the desserts! Here are recipes for Pumpkin Pie, Apple Cranberry Crumble, and Pumpkin Spice Muffins. Remember: By taking out wheat and other grains, not resorting to gluten-free junk carbohydrate replacements, not adding sugar or high-fructose corn syrup, limiting net carbohydrate content and not using other problem ingredients, we now have healthy desserts that do not pack on the pounds, screw with blood sugar, mess with satiety signals, or exert inflammatory effects. Have your Apple Cranberry Crumble or Pumpkin Spice Muffin and suffer not a moment of guilt! And I think they’re pretty darned tasty, too. Hap...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 26, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Recipes Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly holiday recipes I
At the start of their Wheat Belly journey, many people resign themselves to a life without gravy, biscuits, or pumpkin pie, having to make the best of holidays devoid of enjoyment and indulgence. Just eat your dry turkey meat and lettuce leaves! It’s not true. You can indeed have all your holiday dishes. But we are going to recreate them without wheat, without other grains, without use of gluten-free junk carbohydrates (no cornstarch, tapioca starch, potato starch, or rice flour), with little to no added sugars, and no other problem ingredients. Minus all the undesirable ingredients, in fact, pumpkin pie, biscuits, a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 25, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Recipes Source Type: blogs

Weird wheat re-exposure reactions
As the world of people who are wheat-free continues to grow, I am witnessing a range of weird re-exposure reactions when people, intentionally or inadvertently, get re-exposed. Among the peculiar reactions: Congestive heart failure–A woman with a clear-cut syndrome of wheat intolerance that was evidenced by diabetes, excessive expression of small LDL particles (around 2000 nmol/L at the start), high triglycerides, gastrointestinal distress, widespread joint pain, and a peripheral neuropathy (impaired coordination, reduced sensation to the legs), and negative blood markers for celiac disease, improved substantially a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 19, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Re-exposure syndromes Source Type: blogs

Jessica L.
Jessica’s story is truly inspiring. Her battle back to better health is the kind of empowerment I hope to facilitate with Grain Brain. Adopting a Grain Brain-friendly lifestyle not only gave Jessica back control of her health, but her entire life. – Dr. Perlmutter As a travel writer with a somewhat unusual story of having sold everything my husband and I valued and owned, with no storage, on Halloween, one year ago, we left our lifetime home, family, and friends to travel the world and write about our daily adventures and share photos. Just one year prior to that, I wasn’t able to go to any of our grandch...
Source: Renegade Neurologist - A Blog by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN - November 1, 2013 Category: Neurologists Authors: gbadmin Tags: Success Alzheimer’s gluten free Grain Brain low-carb Spinal degeneration sugar travel Source Type: blogs

Is There a Right Way to Feed a Baby?
This morning I opened “The Four Month Visit” email sitting in my mailbox from my pediatrician’s practice. Under the topics for the approaching visit is “solid foods.” The blurb reads “Solid food: Since Brandon looks hungrily at your food and tries to grab it, how about starting him on a little solid food? Don’t waste your time with cereals, since they offer little added nutritional value. Read more about when, how and why to start your child on solid foods.” Don’t waste my time with cereals? I spoke with some friends whose doctors told them to start with rice cereal. M...
Source: World of Psychology - October 13, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Jill Ceder, MSW, JD Tags: Children and Teens Disorders Eating Disorders Family General Habits Health-related Parenting Research Alan Greene Breakfast cereal Childhood Obesity food little solid food Nutrition Nutritionist Rice rice cereal starter Source Type: blogs

Supreme Court Asks Solicitor General About Whistleblower Cases
The US Supreme Court has asked the US Solicitor General to comment on a case that calls into question whether whistleblowers may be restricted from filing lawsuits alleging drugmakers duped federal healthcare programs into paying for medicines (see page 6). And what may be at stake is the ability of the federal government to recover billions of dollars from healthcare fraud. The case involves a Takeda Pharmaceutical sales manager named Noah Nathan, who claims the drugmaker defrauded Medicare by falsely marketing higher doses of its Kapidex treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, than what was approved by th...
Source: Pharmalot - October 8, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Medical Mispronunciations and Misspelled Words: The Definitive List.
Hearing medical mispronunciations and seeing misspelled words are an under appreciated  joy of working in healthcare.  Physicians often forget just how alien the language of medicine is to people who don't live it everyday.  The best part about being a physician is not helping people recover from critical illness. The best part is not  about  listening and understanding with compassion and empathy.  Nope, the best part about being a physician is hearing patients and other healthcare providers butcher the language of medicine and experiencing great entertainment in the process.   Doctors c...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - October 2, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Tamer Mahrous Source Type: blogs

Go Water Your Eggs or Something
Monday - Entry 36:Not sure where to begin. Let’s try this: And then I was depressed.There. I can work with a beginning like that. It’s spells out the problem and hints that something happened before I made my realization.This day has been a hard one to get through. The sickness lingers, sapping me of energy & strength. Each cough is a gagging experience. My lungs burn. My head throbs. I’ve been sick like this since August 21st. I know. I know. I promised not to count the days. I haven’t. I just remember acutely the day my life ended. You’ll have to forgive me. I don’t consider lying ...
Source: The Splintered Mind by Douglas Cootey - September 24, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Tags: Journaling Writing Depression Therapizing Source Type: blogs

Arrhythmia Masquerading as Cardiac Ischemia
A 45-year-old woman with a history of medication-controlled essential hypertension, stage 2 chronic kidney disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a pack-a-day cigarette habit presented less than 60 minutes after acute onset of severe shortness of breath that awoke her from sleep. She had felt well the previous day, and went to bed with no complaints.   Around 4 a.m., she woke up from sleep very dyspneic, with moderate chest “discomfort” over her left chest that radiated to her back and was unchanged by position or respirations. She denied other symptoms such as fever, cough, nausea, vomiting, numbness, or ...
Source: Spontaneous Circulation - September 12, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Arrhythmia Masquerading as Cardiac Ischemia
A 45-year-old woman with a history of medication-controlled essential hypertension, stage 2 chronic kidney disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a pack-a-day cigarette habit presented less than 60 minutes after acute onset of severe shortness of breath that awoke her from sleep. She had felt well the previous day, and went to bed with no complaints.   Around 4 a.m., she woke up from sleep very dyspneic, with moderate chest “discomfort” over her left chest that radiated to her back and was unchanged by position or respirations. She denied other symptoms such as fever, cough, nausea, vomiting, numbness, o...
Source: Spontaneous Circulation - September 12, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Takeda Manager Asks The Supreme Court To Review A Whistleblower Ruling
Will a recent appeals court ruling restrict the ability of whistleblowers to file lawsuits that allege drugmakers duped federal healthcare programs into paying for medicines? This is the contention made by Noah Nathan, a sales manager at Takeda Pharmaceuticals, who claims the drugmaker defrauded Medicare by falsely marketing higher doses of its Kapidex treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, than what was approved by the FDA. So far, Nathan has lost two rounds in court, but now hopes the US Supreme Court will review his case. Why? In his view, a decision earlier this year by the US Court of Appeals for the ...
Source: Pharmalot - August 14, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly rocks Brazil!
Brazilian rock singer Octavio Godoy of the hard rock band, Metalmorphose, tells his wheat-free success story. (Wheat Belly was recently released in Brazil–19 countries and counting!) Since I was 20 years old, I started to gain weight. My weight back then was about 76 kg [167.2 pounds]. Now I´m 46 and last year I felt like I was exploding: My weight reached 98 kg [215.6 pounds] for my 1.72 m [67-inch] height.                   Octavio, in black, before Wheat Belly. I started to exercise by biking, but could only lose about 3 kg [6.6 lb]. Then I started swimming, too...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 2, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

A physician declares a wheat-free success–from Cyprus!
A physician from the island of Cyprus posted these telling comments: I am wheat and gluten free since the end of January, 2013. I suffer from type II diabetes, which was controlled with difficulty and I could not lose weight. I had acid reflux issues day & night, I was snoring every night, I could not sleep on my tummy, I had pain in several joints and I was suffering from diarrhea almost on a daily basis with tummy aches. (Gastroenterologists thought it was stress related.) After the first long and hard weekend of removing wheat and gluten from my diet (headaches, agitation, arthritic pain), most of these issues reso...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 22, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

Should Lawyers Be The New Doctors?
Dear patients, It has been a hard week. I wanted to take a moment to personally apologize for all that you have endured. As one who has witnessed your pains and struggles, I can only wince with each new passing hurdle you are forced to leap over. This business of disease and illness is not for the weak of heart (metaphorically, that is). To the man stranded in the hospital with a pelvic fracture, I wanted to say I'm sorry. Contrary to what you have been told, it was not I who gave the order to make your admission an observation. In fact, I did just the opposite. I had clicked the full admission order while doing the requ...
Source: In My Humble Opinion - July 17, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Authors: Jordan Grumet Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belliers share their wheat re-exposure experiences
How do we associate cause and effect? How do we KNOW when acid reflux, bowel urgency, depression, anxiety, asthma, joint pain and myriad other health complaints are due to consumption of modern wheat? Simple: When you can turn them on, turn them off, turn them on, turn them off, repeatedly and at will. For instance, avoid wheat, enjoy freedom from bowel urgency and the inconvenient and embarrassing searches for the nearest toilet. Have wheat, explosive return of symptoms. On again, off again: It is the consistent association that establishes a cause-effect relationship in an individual. Read the incredible descriptions fr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 8, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat re-exposure syndromes Source Type: blogs

Hot flashes no more!
Deb posted this comment in response to the Smarter, Faster, Better post describing the transformations in her brother’s life and her own health minus wheat: After watching my 52-year-old brother drop 53 pounds in 6 months, I knew he was onto something BIG! For years he had experienced severe digestive issues, was turning into a recluse, he complained constantly about aches and pains, and he was depressed. A friend turned him onto Wheat Belly and it changed his life. Thank you for giving me my brother back! After eliminating wheat, he no longer has any digestive-colitis issues, his depression is gone (without medicati...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 26, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

How quickly does wheatlessness unfold?
Wheatlessness: the happy, healthy state achieved by not eating wheat. A frequently asked question: Once you eliminate wheat, how fast do the benefits occur? Well, it depends. It depends on what health issue we are discussing, what organ system, and how far along the process of wheat destruction you were. Nonetheless, there are a number of common patterns that develop once you decide to eliminate all things wheat in your life: Gastrointestinal Acid reflux, bowel urgency–5 days is typical for these conditions to reduce or go away entirely. Ulcerative colitis, Crohns–These complex inflammatory conditions require...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 15, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-ectomy Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

How Much? Pfizer And Teva Reach $2.1B Deal Over Patent Dispute
This is an example of why at-risk launches are, well, risky. After nearly a decade of squabbling, Teva Pharmaceutical and Sun Pharmaceutical have agreed to settle a heated patent dispute with Pfizer over the Protonix acid-reflux by paying $2.15 billion. More specifically, Teva will shell out $1.6 billion – half this year and half next year - and Sun will pay the rest. At issue was a bet by Teva to begin selling a generic version of Protonx in December 2007 while simultaneously challenging the patent on the medicine that, at the time, was sold by Wyeth, which Pfizer subsequently acquired. The hope was that Teva, which...
Source: Pharmalot - June 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture Improves Diabetic Gastroparesis
By Diane Fennell "Needleless" acupuncture can provide relief for people dealing with diabetic gastroparesis, according to new research recently presented at the 2013 Digestive Disease Week meeting in Orlando, Florida. As many as 50% of people with diabetes will develop gastroparesis. Gastroparesis, most commonly caused by damage to the nerve fibers that control the movements of the stomach, is a condition in which the stomach's ability to move food into the small intestine is reduced. This slow stomach emptying results in a variety of symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, feelings of fullness after eating, a l...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - May 31, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly saves a life
Tammy posted this astounding story of a life saved by the Wheat Belly message: I have been off wheat since November, 2012, and I can tell you that it was life changing. September and October were very scary months for me. I was very close to killing myself. I imagined taking pills and just ending it. I was terrified to go to bed because that was when the darkest thoughts would come. I was in constant pain, all of my joints were inflamed, and I was getting to the point where I couldn’t walk. I was getting heart palpitations every time I ate. The acid reflux was awful. I felt like I was never digesting my food. I was ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 26, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

Left Bundle Branch Block with Less Than 1 mm of Concordant ST Elevation (in the Setting of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy)
A male in his 60's with a known history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM) presented for chest pain.  He thought  it was "acid reflux," and it started a few hours prior to his presentation to a non-PCI capable hospital.  He denied any associated symptoms.  His pain was not relieved with NTG.  He had an minimally elevated troponin at the referral institution, (assay unknown).  He was diaphoretic and clutching his chest.  Here is the first ECG:There is sinus rhythm with LBBB and high voltage, and all leads have appropriate and proportional discordance EXCEPT for lead V4, which ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - May 3, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Feeding tubes and weird ideas
My favorie BADD post: Tube-ageddon. I haven't had much time to write anything here about the hell I went through getting my GJ tube. I had every indication for a GJ tube. I had gastroparesis so bad it was starting to affect my breathing, in a way that doctors said was likely to result in infection after infection until I died. From the emergency room onward, doctors were saying my best hope was to get a feeding tube. Yet the pressure I got from doctors, while in the hospital for one of those infections, was to just keep getting infections, go home, wait to die. Most of them wouldn't say that outright. But som...
Source: Ballastexistenz - May 2, 2013 Category: Autism Authors: Amanda Tags: Abuse Autism Bullying Cognitive disability Degradation Developmental disability Disability Rights Discrimination Ethics Ethics, justice, etc. Food Hatred Medical Medical stuff Outside Perceptions Physical disability Power Source Type: blogs

EsophyX for Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication (TIF) Proves Itself in Trial (w/video)
Fundoplication surgery has been around since the 1950′s as an option to treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatus hernia. The technique normally requires an invasive procedure and involves suturing the upper part of the stomach around the lower part of the esophagus. This provides the added strength to the lower esophageal sphincter and prevents the expansion of the esophageal hiatus.EsophyX, a device introduced a few years ago by EndoGastric Solutions (Redwood City, CA), offers a new, minimally invasive way for performing fundoplications.  The entire procedure is performed using an incisio...
Source: Medgadget - May 2, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: GI Surgery Source Type: blogs

FDA: Enhancing Benefit-Risk Assessment in Regulatory Decision Making
Last summer, Congress enacted the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA), which included the fifth authorization of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA V).  Title I of FDASIA reauthorizes the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA), which provides FDA with the necessary user fee resources to maintain an efficient review process for human drug and biologic products.  The reauthorization of PDUFA includes performance goals and procedures that represent FDA’s commitments during FY 2013-2017.  These commitments are referred to in section 101 of FDASIA. Section X of these comm...
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 25, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Type 1 diabetes . . . cured?
Carrie posted this wonderfully thought-provoking comment about her diabetic son: My 13 yr old son was diagnosed over a year ago with Type 1 [diabetes]. Before his diagnosis, I was very ‘green’ — bought organic foods, bought meat from free-range, grass-fed local farms, cleaned my house with products I made myself from vinegar and natural products. But we did follow the low-fat, low-calorie, high-fiber, healthy whole grain diet. We were told “eat whatever you want” — just dose for it [with insulin] and be healthy (yep: low-fat, high-fiber, etc.) I didn’t think so: If he has a carb p...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 19, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Diabetes Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

With GERD, How Often Should My Father Have an EGD Done?
GERD, also known as acrid reflux disease, can lead to esophageal cancer. People with GERD are encouraged to have endoscopic exams to check for this cancer.Contributor: Melissa HowePublished: Apr 17, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - April 17, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Diagnosed with Hiatus Hernia, Acid Reflux, and Gastritis, Where Do I Go from Here, and What Does All This Mean?
I am twenty seven years old and have recently had problems with bloating, constipation, blood in my stool, and belching.Contributor: Jessica BroussardPublished: Apr 17, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - April 17, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Could Food Additives Have Been Causing My Acid Reflux?
Has a change in diet overcome my acid reflux disease?Contributor: Gregory LovvornPublished: Apr 17, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - April 17, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Do Alzheimer's Medications Work, Who Should Take Them?
Over the years my clients have asked me, “Should my loved one be taking any of the Alzheimer’s medications?” By Bob DeMarco Alzheimer's Reading Room Over the years my answer has differed depending on how much I knew about the medications, the relative costs of the medications, and how much research has been done on the effectiveness of the medications. Here is what I’m saying currently. There are only 5 medicines that the FDA has approved for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. None of the medications cure the disease. None of the medications stop the disease process from continuin...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - April 15, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Another Blow To AstraZeneca: S&P Lowers Its Outlook
Three weeks ago, Pascal Soirot unveiled a months-long effort to rebuild AstraZeneca, which he joined last fall as ceo amid a disheartening lack of new drugs and increased generic competition. His plan revolves around consolidating R&D and global marketing operations over the next two years, a move that will eventually eliminate 1,600 jobs by 2016 and save some $900 million annually. Earlier this year, Soirot also booted the former head of global commercial activities and created a new position to bridge R&D and sales (read more here). Initially, the response to his plan was enthusiastic, at least among investo...
Source: Pharmalot - April 9, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

The Ethics of "Hand-Offs" in Medicine
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - April 2, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

A Court Ruling Against Merck May Also Hurt Pfizer
In a setback for Merck, a federal judge refused to dismiss a whistleblower lawsuit that accuses the drugmaker of distorting so-called nominal pricing in order to build a huge customer base for its Nuvaring contraception device and three contraceptive pills. The lawsuit, which was filed by two former employees, also claims the drugmaker offered kickbacks to physicians in exchange for prescribing a cancer medication. At issue is an alleged scheme in which Organon – which Merck (MRK) inherited as part of its 2009 purchase of Schering-Plough – offered a steep discount to Planned Parenthood for its contraceptive pro...
Source: Pharmalot - February 26, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: Ed Silverman Tags: Uncategorized Birth Control Pills Contraception Contraceptives Medicaid Merck Nuvaring Organon Pfizer Planned Parentood Schering Plough Wyeth Source Type: blogs

The happy “coincidences” of wheatlessness
Wheat Belly Blog reader, Limor, posted this triumphant story of freedom from the health-destroying bonds of wheat: You validated what I have felt for so many years!! I read you book and watched your lectures over and over again and was fascinated by your knowledge and findings. I am a therapist in NYC specializing in Eating Disorders and I also recovered from Anorexia and Bulimia. I have been gluten-free for over a year and, after reading your book, I am working hard on being wheat-free. Prior to being wheat-free, I suffered severe pains and cramps in my stomach. After several failed attempts to ask various doctors why I...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 26, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Eating disorderes Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

Chef Pete Evans goes wheat-free!
Australian chef and TV personality, Pete Evans, asked me to write a section for his new cookbook: Over the last 12 months we have been working on a new cookbook, which will be available in about a years time [February 2014]. Dr William Davis, a preventative cardiologist who wrote “WHEAT BELLY” (a must read book) has kindly shared his research for our new book, along with a host of other highly respected health and wellness pioneers and experts. And for the record the only flour we use at home is coconut and almond flours. Pete tells me that, in the new cookbook, “there will be no recipes featuring wheat&...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 24, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A drug for every wheat condition
Nina posted this tale of an entire family’s health gone sour, treated with medication after medication, only to discover that it was wheat at the bottom of it all. Thank you, thank you, thank you for your book. So many answers in one place. My oldest daughter had what moms call “upset stomach” a lot while growing up. She began having acid reflux which only got worse and, by her sophomore year of high school, she had grade B esophageal ulcers and was diagnosed with depression. By senior year, her GI doctor had run all the tests. She was on 3 types of meds: one for reflux, one for irritable bowel, and one...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 12, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Gluten sensitivity Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

FDA May Change Warning Regs For Generic Labels
Last year, the US Supreme Court ruled generic drugmakers are not required to strengthen labeling even when alerted to side effects. The decision came in response to lawsuits by two women who claimed changes could have been made under state law and without FDA approval. They argued generic drugmakers would create uncertainty about safety if they are not held liable under state laws and update labeling in the face of evidence of serious side effects. Under current FDA regulations, however, generic drugmakers cannot update labeling, even if they become aware of a potential risk not mentioned in the labeling. Brand-name drugm...
Source: Pharmalot - February 11, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: Ed Silverman Tags: Uncategorized FDA Pliva Preemption Prescription Drug Lableling Takeda Pharmaceuticals Source Type: blogs

Celiac is not a disease
. Lest you think I’ve gone off my rocker, let me explain. Say that, of 100 people you know who smoke, only 1 gets lung cancer. Do we declare that the only person who has problems with cigarettes is the poor unfortunate guy or girl with the one lung cancer? Shall we ignore the 60 cases of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, the 10 abdominal aortic aneurysms, the 5 thoracic aortic and iliofemoral aneurysms, the oral, tongue, and laryngeal cancers, and the several dozen other conditions that typically develop in smokers–but not as imminently fatal as lung cancer? In other words, do we dismiss all these conditions ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 5, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Celiac disease Source Type: blogs

Feeling good–for the first time . . . ever!
Asha posted this wonderful tale of life and health turned around minus wheat. I am so excited! I am in my 5th or 6th week of Wheat Belly. I was so sick. My life was all about seeing the next doctor. My earliest memories are sitting in a hospital or doctor’s office with my mom. Actually, until now I don’t ever recall feeling good. One illness after another. The doctors I went to could not figure out what was wrong, or did not have time to take a deeper look. I saw an episode on the Doctor Oz Show a couple of months ago on wheat and Dr. Davis’ testimony about his patients, so I thought I would give it a ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 23, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

Nutritional supplements in the wake of wheat elimination
Consumption of modern wheat distorts health at many levels. Remove wheat, like removing a splinter that makes your finger hot, sore, and open to infection, and the body needs to readjust to this new lifestyle. There are a number of strategies to consider to accelerate the adjustment. And there are other strategies worth considering that help recover overall ideal health. This last item, of course, is a huge issue, but there are several basic efforts that provide outsized benefits. Among the issues/strategies to consider: Bowel health Remove this great disrupter of normal bowel flora called modern wheat and you need to tra...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 12, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat withdrawal Source Type: blogs

Interview with Jacques Lepine, CEO Slow Control, inventor of the 1st smart fork
Have you heard of the digital fork? Jacques Lépine, the man who wants us all to be "eating slowly" is the founder of ‘Slow Control’. He created a concept, a product, and a company, in order to help us manage the speed with which we eat. And many people are listening to him at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, where his fork is debuting at the HapiLabs stand. My company Basil Strategies is accompanying this French start-up, that we believe is making its mark on the Quantified Self movement. DS  How would you describe your invention? JL  Well, as an engineer, I can say that th...
Source: Denise Silber's eHealth - January 8, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Denise Silber Tags: eHealth Quality of healthcare Source Type: blogs

Interview with Jacques Lepine, CEO Slow Control, inventor of the 1st smart fork
Have you heard of the digital fork? Jacques L épine, the man who wants us all to be"eating slowly" is the founder of‘Slow Control’. He created a concept, a product, and a company, in order to help us manage the speed with which we eat. And many people are listening to him at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, where his fork is debuting at the HapiLabs stand. My company Basil Strategies is accompanying this French s tart-up, that we believe is making its mark on the Quantified Self movement.DS  How would you describe your invention?JL  Well, as an engineer, I can say that thi...
Source: Denise Silber's eHealth - January 8, 2013 Category: Information Technology Authors: Denise Silber Tags: eHealth Quality of healthcare Source Type: blogs

First Person: Living with GERD
Thousands of people suffer from Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). For a food and drink lover like me, it was one of the most disappointing things that could happen to me. But I was able to get my condition under control and so can you.Contributor: Rochelle Miller-HernandezPublished: Jan 07, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - January 7, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Asthma, atrial fibrillation, and attitude
David posted these important observations he made about his own health. I am a 48 year old male and have been healthy and fit for the majority of my life. I am an avid cyclist and have been so for twenty years now. I have the good fortune of excellent blood pressure and heart rate and my cholesterol and triglycerides are in the healthy range. Until recently, my only notable health challenge has been exercise-induced asthma. I have not been able to ride my bike without an inhaler since I was a kid. Anyone who uses a salbutamol inhaler will be aware that it is a nasty inhalant and can make you agitated and irritable. I have ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 4, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Asthma Atrial fibrillation Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs