What does it mean to live in the age of Abilify? 
I learned recently that the antipsychotic Abilify is the biggest selling prescription drug in the U.S.  To be a top seller, a drug has to be expensive and also widely used.  Abilify is both.  It’s the 14th most prescribed brand-name medication, and it retails for about $30 a pill.  Annual sales are over $7 billion, nearly a billion more than the next runner-up. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 23, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Medications Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Abilify: It's Really Expensive!
Sometimes, I like to bother pharmacists.  They are the nicest people, and very patient about looking up medication costs for me.  Once, I wrote a post called The Co$t of Being Depressed, where I compared the cost of anti-depressants. Today,  I'm writing over on our Clinical Psychiatry News website about The Surprisingly High Cost of Abilify.  Here's the short form, but do surf over there for details:I called three pharmacies and compared prices on Abilify.Please remember, this data is for three pharmacies only A single 2 mg tablet cost between $30 and $33 dollars.  More don't cost appreciably less ...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 14, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

A patient’s experience with diagnostic overshadowing
I have been a victim of diagnostic overshadowing by a primary care physician.  I’ve been dealing with major depressive disorder, recurrent, severe and anorexia for twenty-five years — practically my entire adult life.  However, I work full-time and I’m a published writer.  At the time I saw this PCP, I was on hefty doses of Cymbalta (an antidepressant) and Abilify (an antipsychotic which can also be used to boost the effects of an antidepressant). Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 4, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Patient Pain management Patients Primary care Source Type: blogs

Clever Hospitals Find Another Way to Snag New Patients
Last month, I wrote about a hospital system in Colorado that had discovered a way to cross market its more profitable emergency room services if a patient first came to its urgent care center. Pretty clever! Then recently I came across another health care marketing trick close to home and just as sly. As I sat on a New York subway one sizzler of a day, an ad for an ice cream cone grabbed my attention. Ice cream! Hot day! After a closer read, I realized the ad was not touting ice cream but the Center for Advanced Digestive Care, a part of New York Presbyterian, one of the city’s most prestigious hospitals and well kno...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - August 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What’s In Our Medicine Cabinets?
By HANS DEUVEFELT, MD  Recently published statistics show that the top-grossing medication in the U.S. for 2013 was the antipsychotic Abilify (aripiprazole) with over $6 billion in sales, narrowly beating out the previous few years’ winner, Nexium. The past decade’s dominating pharmaceuticals have been Lipitor (atorvastatin) for high cholesterol and Nexium (esomeprazole) for acid reflux. Nexium […] (Source: The Health Care Blog)
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: THCB Abilify Drug sales Medicalization Nexium Pharmaceutical sales Viagra Source Type: blogs

Cardiovascular and Diabetes Outcomes Among Those taking Novel Antipsychotics
I remember from medical school and the early days of my residency when the only medications available to treat psychosis were the neuroleptics.  Patients hated taking them: the high potency medicines like Haldol and Prolixin left people rigid; they had pill-rolling movements with their fingers, cogwheeling in their joints, and they walked liked zombies.  The lower potency medications like Mellaril left people drooling and sedated.  I once heard these medications described as like having molasses poured into your brain.  We'd cajole people in to taking them, and like all medications, there were some peop...
Source: Shrink Rap - January 20, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Results of the Survey on Who Are the Mentally Ill?
Thank you to everyone who participated!The survey was published on Shrink Rap from December 10, 2013 - December 22, 2013.Respondents were solicited through social media, including blogs, listservs, Facebook, and Twitter.  Respondents were not limited to the United States.  Please note that the survey was not validated.  The data below was pasted directly from the Google "Summary of Responses" with no analysis or interpretation.SummaryAnyone who has seen a therapist is mentally illTrue172%False67698%Anyone who has been in psychotherapy with a psychiatrist is mentally illTrue619%False63091%Anyone who take...
Source: Shrink Rap - January 2, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

A Guide To: Abilify
Abilify has quickly become one of the top prescription medications in the United States. This guide offers beginner information about the antipsychotic drug.Contributor: Nicole M.Published: Nov 03, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - November 3, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Antipsychotics Can Triple The Risk That Children Develop Diabetes
In a disturbing finding, children prescribed several widely prescribed antipsychotics face a threefold risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the first year of usage compared with other medications that are available for the same disorders the medicines are used to treat. Originally prescribed for schizophrenia, the pills are now used to treat bipolar disorder, ADHD and mood disorders, such as depression. “It’s well known that antipsychotics cause diabetes in adults, but until now the question hadn’t been fully investigated in children,: Wayne Ray, one of the study authors and director of the division of pharmacoe...
Source: Pharmalot - August 22, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Over-Drugged Medicaid Children
As reported in the Wall Street Journal (here):"Federal health officials have launched a probe into the use of antipsychotic drugs on children in the Medicaid system, amid concern that the medications are being prescribed too often to treat behavioral problems in the very young.  "The effort applies to a newer class of antipsychotic drugs known as "atypicals," which include Abilify, the nation's No. 1 prescription drug by sales. The drugs were originally developed to treat psychoses such as schizophrenia, but some now have Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of children with conditions such as bipo...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - August 13, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Tags: Cymbalta Seroquel medicaid anti-psychotics Children Abilify Source Type: blogs

Feds Probe Antipsychotic Prescriptions For Children In Medicaid
In response to the rising rate at which antipsychotics are prescribed to children, the Office of Inspector General at the US Department of Health & Human Services is investigating the trend and asked the states to tighten prescribing oversight, The Wall Street Journal writes. The move comes amid ongoing that the drugs are used too freely to children to curb violent or aggressive behavior. The issue, in fact, has been contentious for several years, especially before drugmakers won FDA approval to market their antipsychotics, which are approved to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autistic disorder, to increasing...
Source: Pharmalot - August 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

At Last! - U.S. Probes Use of Antipsychotic Drugs on Children
By LUCETTE LAGNADO Federal health officials have launched a probe into the use of antipsychotic drugs on children in the Medicaid system, amid concern that the medications are being prescribed too often to treat behavioral problems in the very young. The inspector general's office at Department of Health and Human Services says it recently began a review of antipsychotic-drug use by Medicaid recipients age 17 and under. And various agencies within HHS are requiring officials in all 50 states to tighten oversight of prescriptions for such drugs to Medicaid-eligible young people. View Graphics The effort applies to a newe...
Source: PharmaGossip - August 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Breakthroughs in Bipolar Treatment
"We should continue to repurpose treatments and to recognise the role of serendipity" (Geddes & Miklowitz, 2013).That quote was from a recent review article in The Lancet, which did not hint at any impending pharmacological breakthroughs in the treatment of bipolar disorder. In other words, the future of bipolar treatment doesn't look much different from the present (at least in the immediate term). Bipolar disorder, an illness defined by the existence of manic or hypomanic highs, alternating with depressive lows, can be especially difficult to treat. And the mood episode known as a mixed state, where irritability, ex...
Source: The Neurocritic - August 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

OCD & Chinatown
One way to explain obsessive-compulsive disorder involves a comparison to the old Roman Polanski film “Chinatown”, starring Jack Nicholson. Nicholson plays a detective investigating a suspicious California land developer (played by the director John Huston). As in many detective thrillers, the closer he gets to the truth, the more chaos ensues. He uncovers an incestuous relationship, innocent characters are murdered, and in the final scene, his friend declares his efforts to make the situation right a lost cause, a tragedy (“It’s Chinatown, Jake”). Thankfully, I don’t view obsessive-compulsive disorder ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 21, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Keith Fraser Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Money and Financial OCD Personal Treatment Academic Achievement California Land Chinatown Director John Huston Film Of The Same Name Great Source Type: blogs

Bristol-Myers Coupons For Abilify Are Not Bribes: Judge
For the second time in recent weeks, a federal judge has dismissed lawsuits filed by unions that claimed the coupons issued by drugmakers interfered with their health plans and violated racketeering and anti-trust laws by masquerading as bribes and kickbacks. The latest victory went to Bristol-Myers Squibb, which was charged with defrauding the union health plans by offering discounts directly to consumers in a bid to preserve market share for its Abilify anti-psychotic. In April, a similar case against Merck (MRK) was dismissed by a different federal Judge (read the ruling here). In a 35-page decision, US District Court J...
Source: Pharmalot - June 4, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs