Liver injury in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis leads to a leaky gut

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the more severe form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease that can progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, is associated with leakiness of the intestinal wall, which in turn may worsen liver disease, according to research.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - Category: Science Source Type: news

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co Giannini Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most frequent primary liver cancer, is the sixth most common cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and accounts globally for about 800,000 deaths/year. Early detection of HCC is of pivotal importance as it is associated with improved survival and the ability to apply curative treatments. Chronic liver diseases, and in particular cirrhosis, are the main risk factors for HCC, but the etiology of liver disease is rapidly changing due to improvements in the prevention and treatment of HBV (Hepatitis B virus) and HCV (Hepatitis C virus) infect...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
AbstractAlcohol ‐induced liver disease (ALD) is one of the major causes of chronic liver disease globally. The pathogenesis of alcohol‐induced hepatic injury is characterized by steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis, which can eventually progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma1). Recently, the mechanism of both ALD and non ‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been fairly well studied, but a successful treatment for ALD and NAFLD is not available yet.
Source: Journal of Diabetes Investigation - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: COMMENTARY Source Type: research
We read with great interest the review by Tr épo and Valenti on recent developments in genetics of NAFLD,1 which highlighted the need for further confirmation of the association between the rs2642438 (p.A165T) variant in the mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component 1 (MARC1) gene and liver disease risk. This missense variant was recently sh own to associate with protection from all-cause cirrhosis.2 MARC1 encodes for a molybdenum-containing enzyme in the outer mitochondrial membrane, which has reductive activity for N-hydroxylated compounds, e.g.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
In this study, we show that perforin can act as an immune regulator to prevent the progression of NAFLD. Aged perforin-deficient (Prf−/−) mice have increased lipid accumulation in the liver compared to WT mice. With high-fat diet (HFD) challenge, Prf−/− mice have increased liver weight, more severe liver damage, and increased liver inflammation when compared with WT controls. Mechanistic studies revealed that perforin specifically regulates intrinsic IFN-γ production in CD4 T cells, not CD8 T cells. We found that CD4 T cell depletion reduces liver injury and ameliorates the inflammation and me...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Khneizer G, Rizvi S, Gawrieh S Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the leading liver disease globally. NAFLD patients can have a progressive phenotype, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that could lead to cirrhosis, liver failure and cancer. There is a close bi-directional relationship between NAFLD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); NAFLD increases the risk for T2DM and its complications whereas T2DM increases the severity of NAFLD and its complications. The large global impact of NAFLD and T2DM on healthcare systems requires a paradigm shift from specialty care to early ...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Abstract The most common cause of liver disease worldwide is now non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD refers to a spectrum of disease ranging from steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, causing cirrhosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the impact of NAFLD is not limited to the liver. NAFLD has extra-hepatic consequences, most notably, cardiovascular and renal disease. NAFLD and chronic kidney disease share pathogenic mechanisms including insulin resistance, lipotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress. Not surprisingly, there has been a recent surge in efforts to manage NAFLD...
Source: Journal of Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: J Nephrol Source Type: research
Clinical Liver Disease, Volume 15, Issue 5, Page 195-199, May 2020.
Source: Clinical Liver Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Chronic liver diseases (CLD) are a worldwide clinical problem, as they are related to high morbidity and mortality. The principal causes include viral, alcoholism, cholestatic, autoimmune and metabolic diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). These CLD can evolve into cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Patients with CLD showed significant health problems like ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatic encephalopathy and persistent variceal bleeding concomitant with a decrease in health-related quality of life [1-3].
Source: Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
We read with interest the manuscript by Srivastava et  al.1 We are excited to hear of a novel pathway to capture patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis using sequential non-invasive scoring systems. With the development of agents to potentially reverse NAFLD fibrosis, there is a significant need to i mprove screening of at-risk populations and develop mechanisms for early effective linkage-to-care. Srivastava et al. shed light on the scale of the problem when it comes to screening in the UK, but data from the US remain limited.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeIndicators to assess early liver damage and disease progression in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain unsatisfactory. Albumin binding function has been reported to be an early indicator of liver damage in hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. However, its role in NAFLD patients is unknown.MethodsAn age/sex-matched, case-control study was performed. Albumin-binding capacity (ABiC) and albumin metal ion binding ability, assessed by ischemia modified albumin (IMA), were measured. Correlation analysis was performed to assess the association of albumin binding function with liver function enzymes and noninv...
Source: Endocrine - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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