What Are the Genetics of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN)?

Discussion Primary care physicians often work as part of a health care team. Their job can be particularly important for helping oversee intermittent or ongoing surveillance for various diseases. Some of the challenges are changes in clinical guidelines or treatment for uncommon diseases, timelines for evaluation that are in the future (particularly several years), and communication between various health care providers especially across locations or health systems. It is not surprising that families with children with special health care needs may move closer to their providers and consolidate their care within one health care system. Like many diseases, multiple endocrine neoplasias (MEN) have been a known entity for many years, but the understanding of their genetics has exploded in the past few years. Molecular diagnosis has made this diagnosis easier along with the important genetic counseling of family members as this is mainly an autosomal dominant disease with high penetrance. MEN requires a multidisciplinary team to monitor the patient (as well as the literature for changing practices) over many years. Some centers have clinical specialists who do cancer screening and monitoring for diagnoses which carry increased risks such as MEN, Beckwith-Widemann syndrome, etc. Learning Point One challenge of MEN is that there are multiple tumor types that can be observed. Below is an overview of the most common tumors and known genetics: MEN Type 1 2-20/100,000 persons affecte...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news