LITFL Review 175

Welcome to the 175th LITFL Review. Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week If you are trained in transcutaneously pacing then you absolutely must read part 1 and part 2 of Transcutaneous Pacing Success, over at the EMS 12-Lead Blog. [MG] The Best of #FOAMed Emergency MedicineEM Didactic offers a great primer to the concept of cognitive bias in Emergency Medicine. [AS]Is there a role for prehospital use of furosemide in acute decompensated heart failure? Should it be given in the field at all? A Medic’s Medicine provides a thoughtful review of the literature. [MG]The Blunt Dissection is back, and kicking things off with the case of “a splitting headache.” [MG]Taming the SRU (Shock Resuscitation Unit, pronounced Shrew) features another fantastic prehospital trauma management case with thoughtfully curated expert commentary. Spoiler alert: read the case first before jumping ahead to the commentary to maximize your learning! [MG]Thinking about setting up an in situ simulation programme? Have a listen to this great podcast via Injectable Orange. [SL]The Best of #FOAMcc Critical CareThis years EMCrit Critical Care Conference Blast Winner: Ice Water Baths...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

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Source: European Journal of Sport Science - Category: Sports Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Siamashvili M, Davis S Abstract INTRODUCTION: Bromocriptine mesylate quick release (QR) is a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and is the only oral, primarily centrally acting drug that can be used for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. AREAS COVERED: The authors describe current recommendations on the use of bromocriptine mesylate QR. Major efficacy and safety parameters of the late phase trials, including The Cycloset Safety Trial, have been identified and presented. EXPERT OPINION: Efficacy of bromocriptine mesylate QR monotherapy appears to be low but is compensated by favorable safety pr...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research
Conclusion: Ambulatory renal and cardio-vascular follow-up in case of neonatal medical history can be enhanced, with necessity to raise awareness and to edict guidelines available to pediatricians.What is Known:•There is a compelling evidence of long-term renal and cardiovascular consequences of prematurity and low birth weight.•Specific cardiovascular and renal follow-up guidelines, coming from professional organizations, are currently not available for these patients.What is New:•Pediatricians in ambulatory setting do not adapt their renal and cardiovascular follow-up in case of neonatal medical history.&b...
Source: European Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Vanda Craveiro, Elisabete Ramos, Joana Araújo
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Neurología (English Edition)Author(s): N. Morollón, R. Belvís, A. De Dios, N. Pagès, C. González-Oria, G. Latorre, S. Santos-Lasaosa
Source: Neurologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and ImmunityAuthor(s): Irene Esteban-Cornejo, Chelsea M. Stillman, Maria Rodriguez-Ayllon, Arthur F. Kramer, Charles H. Hillman, Andrés Catena, Kirk I. Erickson, Francisco B. Ortega
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Volume 89Author(s): Mario Gennaro Mazza, Rebecca De Lorenzo, Caterina Conte, Sara Poletti, Benedetta Vai, Irene Bollettini, Elisa Maria Teresa Melloni, Roberto Furlan, Fabio Ciceri, Patrizia Rovere-Querini, COVID-19 BioB Outpatient Clinic Study group, Francesco Benedetti
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Volume 89Author(s): Xiaoqin Liu, Trine Munk-Olsen, Clara Albiñana, Bjarni J. Vilhjálmsson, Emil M. Pedersen, Vivi Schlünssen, Marie Bækvad-Hansen, Jonas Bybjerg-Grauholm, Merete Nordentoft, Anders D. Børglum, Thomas Werge, David M. Hougaard, Preben B. Mortensen, Esben Agerbo
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Volume 89Author(s): Fernando Lopes, Fernando A. Vicentini, Nina L. Cluny, Alexander J. Mathews, Benjamin H. Lee, Wagdi A. Almishri, Lateece Griffin, William Gonçalves, Vanessa Pinho, Derek M. McKay, Simon A. Hirota, Mark G. Swain, Quentin J. Pittman, Keith A. Sharkey
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Neuro-ophthalmologic findings are mostly normal in patients with visual snow syndrome. Retinal or neurological diseases must be excluded as possible causes of visual snow. PMID: 33029971 [PubMed]
Source: Journal of Clinical Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: J Clin Neurol Source Type: research
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