Rehab Fails: What goes wrong in pain rehabilitation 3

I’m beginning to think this series could grow into a monster – so many #rehabfails to pick from! Today’s post is about rehabilitation that doesn’t fit into the person’s life. Or that the person hasn’t been supported to fit the rehabilitation into their life. THEIR life, not ours! You know what I mean: for six to twelve weeks, this person has been coming along to their treatment sessions, doing the things the therapist suggests. They make progress and it’s time to end the programme. “Good bye patient” the therapist says. And the patient skips off into the sunset, fixed for life. Yeah right. Roll that movie right back to the start. At the first consultation, therapists often ask the person about what they’d like to achieve. Often the person doesn’t really know, after all most people don’t routinely set goals – and particularly if someone is experiencing the disruption of dealing with a painful problem that doesn’t go away like it should. It’s not for nothing that people describe this time as being in “zombie land” and dealing only with “the essentials” (Lennox Thompson, et al, 2019). Nevertheless, therapists ask and people are expected to come up with something that can then form the focus of subsequent therapy. A recent systematic review, however, found that many studies describing goal setting practices fail to implement all the components of effect...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Assessment Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Interdisciplinary teams Occupational therapy Pain conditions Physiotherapy Professional topics Psychology Research Resilience/Health Science in practice Uncategorized Source Type: blogs