Metabolic Defects in Myeloid Cells Contribute to the Chronic Inflammation of Aging

Today's commentary discusses recent research into age-related changes in myeloid cell lineages of the innate immune system. These cells are produced by hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, and play important roles in immune function and tissue function throughout the body. With age, hematopoiesis becomes biased towards an ever greater production of myeloid cells at the expense of other immune cells, a problematic shift. As noted in this commentary, the changes also extend to the behavior of myeloid cells, and thus to the capabilities of the immune system. The work here pinpoints one set of changes in myeloid cells outside the brain that nonetheless negatively affects cognitive function, most likely via increased inflammatory signaling. The chronic inflammation of aging is coming to be understood as an important contribution to neurodegeneration. Inflammation is a necessary and useful aspect of our biochemistry when it is present in the short term, in response to infection and injury, for example. When sustained over the long term, however, inflammation disrupts normal tissue function throughout the body - and inflammatory signaling originating outside the brain can pass the blood-brain barrier to alter the behavior of cells in the brain. Myeloid Metabolism as a New Target for Rejuvenation? The immune system is drastically affected with ageing. While the adaptive immune response comprising B-cells and T-cells is diminished, the innate immune syst...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs