Natural infection and vaccination together provide maximum protection against COVID variants

A combination of vaccination and naturally acquired infection appears to boost the production of maximally potent antibodies against the COVID-19 virus, new UCLA research finds.The findings, published today in the peer-reviewed journal mBio, raise the possibility that vaccine boosters may be equally effective in improving antibodies ’ ability to target multiple variants of the virus, including the delta variant, which is now the predominant strain, and the recently detected omicron variant. (The study was conducted prior to the emergence of delta and omicron, butDr. Otto Yang, the study ’s senior author, said the results could potentially apply to those and other new variants.)“The main message from our research is that someone who has had COVID and then gets vaccinated develops not only a boost in antibody amount, but also improved antibody quality — enhancing the ability of antibodies to act against variants,” said Yang, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases and of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.“This suggests that having repeated exposures to the spike protein allows the immune system to continue improving the antibodies if someone had COVID then been vaccinated.”(The spike protein is the part of the virus that binds to cells, resulting in infection.)Yang said it is not yet known whether the same benefits would be realized for people who have re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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The first challenge with rapid at-home self tests for COVID-19 is getting one. But once you have a test, there are now growing questions about what body part you should swab to get the most accurate and reliable results. Your nose? Throat? Cheek? What about your saliva? All of the self tests authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are validated only with nasal samples. But recent coverage of the fact that Omicron tends to cause sore throats, and a small study finding that test samples collected in the throat might detect the presence of the virus earlier than samples collected in the nose, have led to gro...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news
Cureus. 2021 Dec 3;13(12):e20145. doi: 10.7759/cureus.20145. eCollection 2021 Dec.ABSTRACTSince early 2020, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has affected millions of individuals and changed the face of medicine. As the fight against COVID continues, there is still unclear long term effects; although as time passes, more and more is being updated, in regards to the risks of exposure, length of recovery, outcomes of those infected, effectiveness of vaccines, and both expected and unique side effects of both the virus and vaccines, all in an array of individuals. This paper will review a unique top...
Source: Herpes - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract   Purpose of ReviewThe purpose of this review is using the currently available clinical and epidemiological data, to identify key aspects to improve both the clinical management and public health response with regard SARS-CoV-2/HIV co-infection among HIV vulnerable populations and people living with HIV (PLWH).Recent FindingsWhile at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the lack of robust information on SARS-CoV-2/HIV coinfection prevented to have a clear picture of the synergies between them, currently available data strongly supports the importance of common structural factors on both the acquisitio...
Source: Current HIV/AIDS Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Abstract   Purpose of ReviewThe purpose of this review is using the currently available clinical and epidemiological data, to identify key aspects to improve both the clinical management and public health response with regard SARS-CoV-2/HIV co-infection among HIV vulnerable populations and people living with HIV (PLWH).Recent FindingsWhile at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the lack of robust information on SARS-CoV-2/HIV coinfection prevented to have a clear picture of the synergies between them, currently available data strongly supports the importance of common structural factors on both the acquisitio...
Source: Current HIV/AIDS Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has developed into a global pandemic that affect the health of hundreds of millions worldwide. In particular, SARS-CoV-2 infection in people with chronic human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection is of concern, due to their already immunocompromised status. Yet, whether and how the immunological changes brought about by HIV will affect the immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 acute infection and impact the effectiveness of vaccines remain unclear. We discuss the intersection of COVID-19 in HIV-infected individuals.Recent FindingsPe...
Source: Current HIV/AIDS Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewTo introduce readers to policy modeling, a multidisciplinary field of quantitative analysis, primarily used to help guide decision-making. This review focuses on the choices facing educational administrators, from K-12 to universities in the USA, as they confronted the COVID-19 pandemic. We survey three key model-based approaches to mitigation of SARS-CoV-2 spread in schools and on university campuses.Recent FindingsFrequent testing, coupled with strict attention to behavioral interventions to prevent further transmission can avoid large outbreaks on college campuses. K-12 administrators can greatl...
Source: Current HIV/AIDS Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
To assess SARS-CoV-2 outcomes, we matched a municipal COVID-19 registry and clinic rosters from a municipal primary care network containing a large HIV clinic and assessed clinical outcomes by HIV status. The risk of severe COVID-19 was higher among people with HIV (PWH, adjusted relative risk = 1.84, 95% confidence interval = 1.05–3.25), while SARS-CoV-2 incidence was lower despite higher testing rates. SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaigns should prioritize PWH to prevent severe COVID-19 disease given potentially higher risk.
Source: AIDS - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Research Letter Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analyses show that people with HIV, PLHIV with coexisting diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and chronic kidney disease are at a higher likelihood of developing severe COVID-19 outcomes. Bayesian analysis helped to estimate small sample biases and provided predictive likelihoods. Clinical practice should take these risks due to comorbidities into account and not only focus on the HIV status alone, vaccination priorities should be adjusted accordingly.PMID:34797952 | DOI:10.1002/jia2.25841
Source: Journal of the International AIDS Society - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
J Rheumatol. 2021 Oct 15:jrheum.210534. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.210534. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTIn December 2020, France began vaccinations using the messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to combat the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Based on the risk for severe COVID-19, patients with autoimmune diseases (AIDs) who are receiving, or about to receive, steroids or immunosuppressive drugs have been prioritized for vaccination.1.PMID:34654731 | DOI:10.3899/jrheum.210534
Source: J Rheumatol - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Source Type: research
On Oct. 6, the World Health Organization recommended use of the first vaccine to fight malaria. The decision is momentous and highly anticipated for many reasons: among them is that this is the first vaccine to help reduce the risk of deadly severe malaria in young children in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease remains a leading killer. The vaccine offers hope that there can be a circle of learning from one pandemic to the next. Malaria, our oldest pandemic, may offer insights on how we can survive contemporary scourges like COVID-19. Malaria evolved at least 2.5 million years ago and first infected humans in rural part...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health healthscienceclimate Source Type: news
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