Outcomes of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Because of Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection Stratified by Involved Coronary Artery

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a nonatherosclerotic cause of myocardial infarction.1 Unlike atherosclerosis,2 treating patients with SCAD with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is not associated with better outcomes.3 Because conservative therapy is preferred, its role in those presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) involving left main (LM) or proximal left anterior descending (LAD) arteries or with cardiogenic shock remains undefined. Therefore, we used the Nationwide Readmission Database (NRD) to explore the outcomes of SCAD causing STEMI, stratified by the coronary artery involved and revascularization status.
Source: The American Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research

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Transradial access (TRA) has shown to be a safer procedure than transfemoral access (TFA) because of its lower risk of major bleeding, lower complications related to vascular access, and decreased mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome.1,2 More specifically, emerging evidence has suggested that TRA may be associated with lower mortality compared with TFA in patients who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).2 –4 In a recent meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials by Jhand et al, TRA was associated with a lower all-cause mortal...
Source: The American Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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Source: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Atherosclerosis - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
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