Two years into COVID ‐19 – Lessons in SARS‐CoV‐2 and a perspective from papers in FEBS Letters

The 2019 outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Wuhan (Hubei province of China) has given rise to a pandemic spread of virus, more than 240 million incidences and a death toll larger than 5 million people. COVID-19 has set off large efforts in research, therapy and patient care, as well as public and private debates in every imaginable form. A number of scientists used the publication platforms provided by the Federation of the European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) to present their research data, reviews, opinions and other contributions relating to COVID-19 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here, I highlight the recent COVID-19 papers which have been published and collected in a Virtual Issue inFEBS Letters, and discuss their implications towards understanding the molecular, biochemical and cellular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infections, vaccine development and antiviral discovery strategies.
Source: FEBS Letters - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

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When Jeremy Luban first looked over the genetic sequence of the Omicron variant on his phone one day last November, it was five o’clock in the morning. But even at that hour, the University of Massachusetts virus expert knew right away Omicron was a problem. First, there was the sheer number of new mutations—by some counts, as many as 50, with 30 of them in the critical places that vaccines and drug treatments target. Second, this new version of the SARS-CoV-2 virus seemed to appear out of nowhere, unpredictably and with no immediately obvious connection to previous variants. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”tru...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news
World J Hepatol. 2021 Dec 27;13(12):1850-1874. doi: 10.4254/wjh.v13.i12.1850.ABSTRACTThe outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic. Many clinical trials have been performed to investigate potential treatments or vaccines for this disease to reduce the high morbidity and mortality. The drugs of higher interest include umifenovir, bromhexine, remdesivir, lopinavir/ritonavir, steroid, tocilizumab, interferon alpha or beta, ribavirin, fivapiravir, nitazoxanide, ivermectin, molnupiravir, hydroxychloroquine/chloroquine alone or in combination with azithromycin, and baricitinib. Gastrointestinal (GI) sy...
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Abdellatif The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), also known as COVID-19, is currently developing into a rapidly disseminating and an overwhelming worldwide pandemic. In severe COVID-19 cases, hypercoagulability and inflammation are two crucial complications responsible for poor prognosis and mortality. In addition, coagulation system activation and inflammation overlap and produce life-threatening complications, including coagulopathy and cytokine storm, which are associated with overproduction of cytokines and activation of the immune system; they might be a lead cause of organ damage. ...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
In this study, Metadichol® was found to be 270 times more potent an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 (EC50 = 96 ng/mL) than camostat mesylate (EC50 = 26000 ng/mL). Additionally, it inhibits ACE with an EC50 of 71 ng/mL, but it is a very weak inhibitor of ACE2 at an EC50 of 31 μg/mL. Furthermore, the live viral assay performed in Caco-2 cells revealed that Metadichol® inhibits SARS-CoV-2 replication at an EC90 of 0.16 μg/mL. Moreover, Metadichol® had an EC90 of 0.00037 μM, making it 2081 and 3371 times more potent than remdesivir (EC50 = 0.77 μM) and chloroquine (EC50 = 1.14 μM), respectively.PMID:35039793 | ...
Source: Cell Research - Category: Cytology Authors: Source Type: research
This study demonstrates the viral genotypes can be utilized as molecular barcodes in combination with epidemiologic data to monitor the spreading routes of the pandemic and evaluate the effectiveness of control measures. Moreover, the dynamics of viral mutational spectrum in the study may help the early identification of new strains in patients to reduce further spread of infection, guide the development of molecular diagnosis and vaccines against COVID-19, and help assess their accuracy and efficacy in real world at real time. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.PMID:35001392 | DOI:10.1002/jmv.27580
Source: Cancer Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Biosens Bioelectron. 2021 Dec 23;200:113909. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2021.113909. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been recognized as a global pandemic outbreak, opening the most severe socio-economic crisis since World War II. Different scientific activities have been emerged in this global scenario, including the development of innovative analytical tools to measure nucleic acid, antibodies, and antigens in the nasopharyngeal swab, serum, and saliva for prompt identification of COVID-19 patients and to evaluate the immune response to the vaccine. The detection of SARS-CoV-2 in saliva rema...
Source: Biosensors and Bioelectronics - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: research
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., January 6, 2022 – Johnson &Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced new results from the largest study to date on the durability of COVID-19 vaccines in the United States (U.S.), showing that a single shot of the Johnson &Johnson COVID-19 vaccine resulted in long-lasting protection for up to six months against COVID-19 breakthrough infections, hospitalizations, and intensive care unit (ICU) admissions. The study was sponsored by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson &Johnson and conducted in partnership with the Department of Science-Aetion, Inc, and the Division of...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
Preparation means not just improving surveillance and buying more protective gear, but rethinking the way we liveThough at times it can feel hard to believe – especially in recent weeks, perhaps –this pandemic will not last for ever. With more than 5 million dead and hugeeconomic and social costs, its toll has been immense, and unnecessarily so. Secrecy in China, complacency in Europe, reckless and callous rightwing populism in the US and Brazil, and the inequity in vaccine distribution have all contributed.Yet if we learn its lessons, we will be better prepared next time. For there will be a next time. Covid i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Global economy Economics Sars Wildlife Antibiotics Source Type: news
This article summarizes the current pandemic, different strains of SARS-CoV-2, etiology, complexities, surviving medications of COVID-19, and so far, vaccination for the treatment of COVID-19.PMID:34959116 | PMC:PMC8673752 | DOI:10.1016/j.biopha.2021.112550
Source: Biomedicine and pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine and pharmacotherapie - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Source Type: research
Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS), the most frequent cause of acute paralytic neuropathy, is an inflammatory polyneuropathy that is autoimmune in nature. Many infectious agents such as Campylobacter jejuni (the most commonly identified bacteria associated with GBS), cytomegalovirus, Epstein–Barr virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, and Mycoplasma pneumonia, as well as enterovirus D68 and Zika virus and noninfectious agents such as vaccines and surgeries have been reported to trigger GBS. Three main variants of GBS include the classic acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), which is the most comm...
Source: Reviews in Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Tags: FOCUS ON COVID-19 Source Type: research
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