Progress Toward Regional Measles Elimination - Worldwide, 2000-2020

This report describes progress toward World Health Assembly milestones and measles elimination objectives during 2000-2020 and updates a previous report (2). During 2000-2010, estimated MCV first dose (MCV1) coverage increased globally from 72% to 84%, peaked at 86% in 2019, but declined to 84% in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. All countries conducted measles surveillance, although fewer than one third achieved the sensitivity indicator target of ≥2 discarded†† cases per 100,000 population in 2020. Annual reported measles incidence decreased 88% during 2000-2016, from 145 to 18 cases per 1 million population, rebounded to 120 in 2019, before falling to 22 in 2020. During 2000-2020, the annual number of estimated measles deaths decreased 94%, from 1,072,800 to 60,700, averting an estimated 31.7 million measles deaths. To achieve regional measles elimination targets, enhanced efforts are needed to reach all children with 2 MCV doses, implement robust surveillance, and identify and close immunity gaps.PMID:34758014 | DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm7045a1
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research

Related Links:

Biomed Res Int. 2021 Dec 14;2021:6995096. doi: 10.1155/2021/6995096. eCollection 2021.ABSTRACTAt the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, early modelling studies estimated a reduction in childhood vaccinations in low- and middle-income countries. Regular provision of both curative and preventive services such as antenatal care and childhood immunizations has been negatively affected since the onset of the pandemic. Our study was aimed at examining the impact that the pandemic had on childhood vaccination services at the Tamale Teaching Hospital (TTH). A mixed methods study design was employed for the study, which was conduc...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsDuring the COVID-19 outbreak in 2020 there was a decline in all notified infectious diseases compared to the previous years, likely due to massive NPIs adoption, as well as, possibly, to decreased access to care and preventive services that caused difficulties to the surveillance system to detect notifiable infectious diseases. VCRs were still high for most important vaccines while there was a decline for other vaccines as evidence of the impact of the pandemic on vaccination activities.Key messagesNPIs had a deep impact on the reduction of airborne diseases.The decline for non-airborne infections is likely due ...
Source: The European Journal of Public Health - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Sep 3;70(35):1183-1190. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm7035a1.ABSTRACTThe Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that adolescents aged 11-12 years routinely receive tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap); meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY); and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Catch-up vaccination is recommended for hepatitis B (HepB); hepatitis A (HepA); measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR); and varicella (VAR) vaccines for adolescents whose childhood vaccinations are not current. Adolescents are also recommended to receive a booster dose of MenACWY vaccine at age...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
Vaccine uptake can greatly impact on the ability of a country or region to eliminate a disease, which could be detrimental to society if allowed free reign. A high vaccine coverage can produce herd immunity, which confers protection upon the unvaccinated individuals within the population. Although some countries take a voluntary approach to vaccination policies, other countries have mandatory vaccination for specific pathogens. There is a clear inverse correlation between vaccine uptake and incidence of disease and in many countries a trivalent vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella is included in the vaccination sched...
Source: Reviews in Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Tags: VIROLOGY Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Given declines in immunizations during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is reason to be concerned that measles and varicella-associated morbidity and mortality may rise. Employers, especially those with large foreign-born populations or who require international travel may want to educate their populations about common contagious illnesses and offer immunity validation or vaccinations at no or low cost.PMID:33813919 | DOI:10.1177/21501327211005902
Source: Primary Care - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
When does a pandemic end? Is it when life regains a semblance of normality? Is it when the world reaches herd immunity, the benchmark at which enough people are immune to an infectious disease to stop its widespread circulation? Or is it when the disease is defeated, the last patient cured and the pathogen retired to the history books? The last scenario, in the case of COVID-19, is likely a ways off, if it ever arrives. The virus has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and killed more than 2 million. New viral variants even more contagious than those that started the pandemic are spreading across the world. And...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Marian L. TupyHumanity has suffered from deadly diseases for millennia without fully knowing what they were, how they were transmitted, or how they could be cured. Smallpox, which killed between 300 million and 500 million people in the 20th century alone, originated in either India or Egypt at least 3,000 years ago. But it was not until the late 18th century that the English physician Edward Jenner vaccinated his first patient against the disease. It took another two centuries before smallpox was finally eradicated in 1980. Similar stories can be told about other killer diseases. The fate of humanity, our ancestors t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news
More News: Children | COVID-19 | Epidemiology | International Medicine & Public Health | Measles | Measles Vaccine | Outbreaks | Pandemics | Rubella | Rubella Vaccine | Vaccines | WHO