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UCLA cancer research pioneer works with Apple on mobile app to track breast cancer survivors’ experiences

UCLA cancer research pioneer Dr. Patricia Ganz and collaborators Apple and Sage Bionetworks today announced the launch of Share the Journey: Mind, Body and Wellness after Breast Cancer, a patient-centered mobile app that empowers women to be partners in the research process by tracking their symptoms and successes. Available for download today at the iTunes App Store, Share the Journey was developed by UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Penn Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Sage Bionetworks. The app is an interactive research study that aims to understand why some breast cancer survivors recover faster than others, why their symptoms vary over time and what can be done to improve symptoms. Ganz, who is director of cancer prevention and control research at the Jonsson Cancer Center, was a key collaborator with Apple and Sage in developing Share the Journey, which marries science and technology by using surveys and sensor data on the iPhone to collect and track fatigue, mood and cognitive changes, sleep disturbances and reductions in exercise. Share the Journey is one of five new apps being launched in conjunction with Apple’s ResearchKit, an open-source tool that serves as a streamlined hub for iOS apps that can help speed scientific progress toward cures by amplifying the patient voice in shaping research directions and outcomes. Share the Journey shifts the center of care, healing and intervention into the hands of women who have survived ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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ConclusionsWhile QoL in disease-free breast cancer survivors 5  years post-diagnosis was largely comparable to the general population on average, still many survivors suffered from adverse effects. There appears to be a need for ongoing screening and support regarding fatigue, sleep problems, cognitive problems, arthralgia/pain, menopausal/sexual symptoms, phy sical performance, and weight problems during and several years following breast cancer therapy.
Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
CONCLUSION Cognitive impairment can affect daily functioning, quality of life, and capacity to work in patients with cancer and those in remission. Consequently, cognitive assessment is now an important and necessary part of a comprehensive oncological care plan. Cancer-related cognitive impairment might be due to the direct effects of the cancer itself, nonspecific factors, or comorbid conditions that are independent of the disease and/or due to the adverse effects of the treatment or combination of treatments given for the disease. The prevalence and extent of cognitive impairment associated with cancer is recognized but...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognition Current Issue Neuro oncology Neurology Review cancer chemotherapy cognitive impairment neuropsychological assessment treatment Source Type: research
DISCUSSION Outcomes from this study will inform the feasibility and methodology for a future fully-powered RCT. TRIAL REGISTRATION Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry with the identifier ACTRN12617000975392.
Source: Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
In conclusion, the broad diagnosis ‘fatigue’ in cancer survivors needs to be recognized as a diversity of symptoms determined by specific characteristics and likely different etiologies. Taking potential influencing factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, sleep problems, hot flashes, lack of social support, or psychological disorders into consideration might enable a better, individually‐tailored fatigue treatment.
Source: International Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Cancer Epidemiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, the broad diagnosis “fatigue” in cancer survivors needs to be recognized as a diversity of symptoms determined by specific characteristics and likely different etiologies. Taking potential influencing factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, sleep problems, hot flashes, lack of social support, or psychological disorders into consideration might enable a better, individually‐tailored fatigue treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: International Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
This article includes an outline of the protocol for the four-session self-hypnosis classes. PMID: 28557674 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Clin Hypn Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Practices that include gentle movement (such as QG/TCE or our sham protocol) among women with a history of breast cancer may improve many facets of the cancer experience, including QOL, cognitive function, and PA patterns. Practicing QG/TCE may show some advantage for BMI reduction compared to non-meditative gentle exercise. PMID: 27912947 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Med Source Type: research
This study examines moderators and mediators of a yoga intervention targeting quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with breast cancer receiving radiotherapy.Methods. Women undergoing 6 weeks of radiotherapy were randomized to a yoga (YG; n = 53) or stretching (ST; n = 56) intervention or a waitlist control group (WL; n = 54). Depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances were measured at baseline. Mediator (posttraumatic stress symptoms, benefit finding, and cortisol slope) and outcome (36-item Short Form [SF]-36 mental and physical component scales [MCS and PCS]) variables were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and ...
Source: Integrative Cancer Therapies - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Articles Source Type: research
We examined indoor and outdoor light habits of 278 women, BC patients (n = 93), and controls (n = 185; 2010-2014). Cases and controls were age and residential area matched. Data regarding behavior in the sleeping habitat in a 5-year period, 10 to 15 years prior to disease diagnosis, were collected using a questionnaire. Sleep quality, bedtime, sleep duration, TV watching habits, presleeping reading habits, subjective illumination intensity, and type of illumination were collected. Binary logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (ORs with 95% CIs) for BC patients in relatio...
Source: Integrative Cancer Therapies - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Articles Source Type: research
Conclusions. The intervention resulted in several benefits for the general health status of patients. Therefore, it should be considered as feasible and potentially beneficial for women undergoing breast cancer chemotherapy. However, it is necessary for this intervention to be tested through a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of patients before adopting this program in standard cancer care.
Source: Integrative Cancer Therapies - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Articles Source Type: research
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