Issue Highlights

Testing for celiac disease is an appropriate diagnostic step in patients presenting with chronic diarrhea and or abdominal pain.1 Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and negative celiac tests frequently will attempt a gluten free diet (GFD) nonetheless with varying success. In this issue of Clinical Gastroenterology&Hepatology, Pinto-Sanchez and colleagues provide data to guide recommendations regarding a GFD in patients with IBS.2 They tested for anti-gliadin antibodies in 50 patients with IBS diagnosed base on ROME III criteria.
Source: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Issue Highlights Source Type: research

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Gluten? Lactose? Stomach pain? Digestive troubles? Way too many people suffer from gastrointestinal issues, and much less are aware of the digital technologies that can come to their aid. Did you know that digestibles could successfully replace the dreaded colonoscopy? Or have you heard about microbiome testing? What about the swarm of health apps supporting dietary restrictions? We took a deep breath and jumped into the universe of digital technologies just to bring you as much information about the future of gastroenterology as possible. Will you jump after us? IBS, colorectal cancer, and other animals Referring to...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers diet dieting digestibles digestion digital health gastro gastroenterologist gastroenterology gastrointestinal gluten gut Innovation lactose microbiome stomach techno Source Type: blogs
It’s peculiar but instructive: phenomena triggered by re-exposure after being confidently wheat- and grain-free. The re-exposure can be intentional, as in “Just one can’t hurt!” or it can be inadvertent, as in “That gravy looks safe.” Typically, someone will be wheat/grain-free for at least a week. Re-exposure from, say, salad dressing or seasoning mix then triggers re-exposure fireworks. The most common re-exposure phenomena to are: Gastrointestinal distress, bloating, and diarrhea that can last hours to a couple of days. (People with celiac disease can have problems for months, h...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates Detox Gliadin grain-free grains Inflammation joint pain re-exposure wheat belly Source Type: blogs
In the seven years since the original Wheat Belly book hit bookstores and turned the nutritional world topsy-turvy and millions of people have engaged in a grain-free lifestyle, many unique lessons have been learned. Even though I had engaged the practices of this lifestyle for a number of years and in thousands of people before I broadcast these ideas through books, expanding the audience to many more people yielded feedback on an enormous scale, new lessons that even surprised me. Among the new lessons learned along the way: Plantar fasciitis—I did not expect to have so many people report that this painful conditi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates bowel flora gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Follow the current debate on “healthcare reform”–which has NOTHING to do with healthcare reform, but healthcare insurance reform, by the way–and you will hear comments about the escalating and uncontrolled cost of healthcare and how people need access to it. What you will NOT hear is that fact that, because the healthcare system fails to deliver genuine health, real health is actually quite easy, straightforward, and inexpensive–nearly free. We achieve a life of being Undoctored, not becoming a profit source for the healthcare industry, not being subjected to the predatory practices of Big P...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle acid reflux anti-aging autoimmune blood sugar bowel flora cholesterol Dr. Davis energy Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains health healthcare Inflammation joint pain low-carb Source Type: blogs
Dr. Dascha Weir, associate director, Boston Children’s Celiac Disease Program It may be difficult for parents to hear that their child has a chronic illness. When the diagnosis is celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder caused by an intolerance to gluten, there is good news. CD is treatable by changes in diet. How it works: When food enters the stomach, it’s broken down into tiny digestible particles, which then travel through the small intestine. The small intestine is lined with villi — tiny finger-like projections that absorb nutrients from the food passing through. In celiac disease...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & Conditions celiac disease Dr. Dascha Weir gluten intolerance Source Type: news
By Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD Suspect you might have a sensitivity to gluten or dairy, but aren't sure which is the culprit? You might be considering trying an elimination diet. This short-term eating plan has gained popularity recently as a way to identify potential food issues, including allergies, intolerances, and triggers of irksome symptoms--from bloating, joint pain, and fatigue to skin issues like eczema. While there's no one-size-fits-all protocol, an elimination diet typically involves two phases. In the first, several foods are eliminated for at least four weeks, sometimes eight. Then, those foods are added back, o...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion A growing number of today’s children suffer from vaccine damage. Most individuals do not make the connection between health problems and vaccines. When asked about the cause of autoimmune disorders, asthma, allergies, diabetes, learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, autism, and other common childhood diseases and illness, the majority of health care providers advise patients that the causes are unknown. Doctors, including most integrative physicians, fail to make the connection to vaccines. It takes one moment to permanently damage the health of an adult or child, but t...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Stories autoimmune disorders gardasil HPV Vaccine Medical Authority vaccine injury Source Type: blogs
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habit.1 Many patients with IBS also report troublesome bloating or visible abdominal distension. The condition affects between 5% and 20% of the population,2 depending on the criteria used to define its presence, and is more common in women and younger individuals.2,3 Although IBS is not a diagnosis of exclusion,4 with physicians advised to minimize invasive investigations, the symptoms of IBS are not specific,5 and may occur in several other organic GI conditions.
Source: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habit.1 Many patients with IBS also report troublesome bloating or visible abdominal distension. The condition affects between 5% and 20% of the population,2 depending on the criteria used to define its presence, and is more common in women and younger individuals.2,3 Although IBS is not a diagnosis of exclusion,4 with physicians advised to minimize invasive investigations, the symptoms of IBS are not specific,5 and may occur in several other organic GI conditions.
Source: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Jennifer shared her “before” and “after” photos after just 3 weeks of following the Wheat Belly lifestyle: “I am 30. I have been dealing with health issues my whole life. About a month ago, I had to go to the ER for severe abdominal pain and nausea. I still don’t know all that is going on, but I do know the Wheat Belly diet is helping me to get better (docs haven’t been helpful thus far). “This is a pic of me before Wheat Belly on the left and 3 weeks after starting the diet. I have followed your Facebook and seen all the ‘before’ and ‘afters’ and wan...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories abdominal pain gluten grains nausea Source Type: blogs
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