The Aftermath: Post-pandemic Psychiatric Implications of the COVID-19 Pandemic, a South Korean Perspective

In this study, we systematically reviewed and meta-analyzed longitudinal studies that examined mental health of the general population prior to and during the pandemic. Furthermore, we explored the long-term psychiatric implications of the pandemic with data from South Korea. Our analysis showed that the number of suicidal deaths during the pandemic was lower than the previous years in many countries, which is in contrast with the increased depression, anxiety, and psychological distress in the general population in South Korea as well as in other countries. To explain this phenomenon, we propose a possibility of delayed impacts. The post-traumatic stress, long-term consequences of social restrictions, and maladaptive response to the “new normal” are discussed in the paper. COVID-19 being an unprecedented global crisis, more research and international collaboration are needed to understand, to treat, and to prevent its long-term effects on our mental health.
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

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Since March 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic was first officially declared, doctors, nurses and other clinicians have stepped up and shouldered burdens they never anticipated. They rose to the challenge magnificently, caring for the ill while protecting themselves and their families. But their commitment to helping others has come, in many cases, at no small cost to themselves. Even many of those who didn’t contract the coronavirus have changed forever. For those who continue to treat patients with ever more virulent strains of the virus, the deluge of need seems unrelenting. And that constant pressure to provide car...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Conclusions: During the COVID-19 outbreak, the major reported psychological distresses among Chinese teachers are anxiety, sleep disturbance and somatic symptoms. There were gender, age and school setting differences. Females, teachers over 45 years old and those who work at universities tend to be more vulnerable. Different teachers chose different interventions, mostly based on the severity of their symptoms.
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Background: University students who are exposed to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could be mentally distressed. We aimed to evaluate the pattern and risk factors of mental health and suicidal behavior among students who experienced long-term school closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods: This large-sample, cross-sectional, online survey was conducted from June 29, 2020, to July 18, 2020. Eleven thousand two hundred fifty four participants were recruited from 30 universities located in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. The prevalence of symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTS...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Among 26,174 surveyed state, tribal, local, and territorial public health workers, 53% reported symptoms of at least one mental health condition in the past 2 weeks. Symptoms were more prevalent among those who were unable to take time off from work or who felt bullied, threatened, or harassed because of work.
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - Category: American Health Tags: Coronavirus [CoV] Depression Healthcare Workers Mental Health MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report COVID-19 Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: STB at the end of the first wave of the Spain COVID-19 pandemic was high, and large proportions of STB are potentially attributable to mental disorders and adverse events-experiences related to the pandemic, including health-related stress, lack of social support and interpersonal stress. There is an urgent need to allocate resources to increase access to adequate mental healthcare, even in times of healthcare system overload.STUDY REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04556565.PMID:34187614 | PMC:PMC7925988 | DOI:10.1017/S2045796021000093
Source: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Mental Health Parenting Relationships Safety Source Type: blogs
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Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Dr Rachel Clarke never dreamed that in her medical career, she would say out loud that hospitals in Britain are running out of oxygen. Yet some hospitals in the U.K. are now in that critical situation, as doctors say the U.K.’s third wave of the coronavirus pandemic is pushing the country’s National Health Service to its limits. “We’re seeing younger patients, we’re seeing sicker patients, and we’ve never really recovered from the first wave,” says Clarke, who works on an acute medical ward in a hospital in Oxfordshire, England, and also in an in-patient hospice setting. “You...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Londontime Second click United Kingdom Source Type: news
Conclusion: Self-destructive/reckless behavior was the most central symptom in the network of PTSD symptoms related to the COVID-19 pandemic, which as an important target of interfere may have great benefits.
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Recent reports indicate that the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is generating substantial increases in the global burden of depression, anxiety, and acute stress disorders.1,2 Potential explanations include fear of contagion, grief fo...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
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