Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its risk factors among Belgian adults

ConclusionsOur results showed a high prevalence of MetS in the Belgian population. Identifying MetS high risk groups based on the socio-demographic and behavioral determinants is of major importance to establish preventive measures for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes of the Belgian population.Key messagesThe overall prevalence of MetS is almost 31% in the Belgian population.Age, education, overweight, obesity and chronic diseases are factors associated with the presence of MetS.
Source: The European Journal of Public Health - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined the effects of the independent and combined effects of Zataria Multiflora supplementation and circuit resistance training (CRT) on selected adipokines among postmenopausal women. Forty-eight postmenopausal women were divided into four groups: Exercise (EG, n = 12), Zataria Multiflora (ZMG, n = 12), exercise and Zataria Multiflora (ZMEG, n = 12), and control (CG, n = 12). Participants in experimental groups either performed CRT (3 sessions per week with intensity at 55% of one-repetition maximum) or supplemented with Zataria Multiflora (500 mg every day after breakfast with 100 ml of water), or their combination...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
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Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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