Outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infected pregancies after medically assisted reproduction

AbstractSTUDY QUESTIONWhat is the impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection on the outcome of a pregnancy after medically assisted reproduction (MAR)?SUMMARY ANSWEROur results suggest that MAR pregnancies are not differentially affected by SARS-CoV-2 infection compared to spontaneous pregnancies.WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADYInformation on the effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on pregnancy after MAR is scarce when women get infected during MAR or early pregnancy, even though such information is vital for informing women seeking pregnancy.STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATIONData from SARS-CoV-2 affected MAR pregnancies were collected between May 2020 and June 2021 through a voluntary data collection, organised by the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE).PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODSAll ESHRE members were invited to participate to an online data collection for SARS-CoV-2-infected MAR pregnancies.MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCEThe dataset includes 80 cases from 32 countries, including 67 live births, 10 miscarriages, 2 stillbirths and 1 maternal death. An additional 25pregnancies were ongoing at the time of writing.LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTIONAn international data registry based on voluntary contribution can be subject to selective reporting with possible risks of over- or under-estimation.WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGSThe current data can be used to guide clinical decisions in the care of women p...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research

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Conclusions Although patients with a history of COVID-19 had worse function at time of admission to acute rehabilitation, inpatient rehabilitation significantly improved their function to comparable levels as patients who did not have COVID-19. To Claim CME Credits Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME Objectives Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Identify how characteristics of patients with COVID-19 admitted to acute rehabilitation differ from those with similar admission codes but without COVID-19; (2) Desc...
Source: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: CME Article . 2021 Series . Number 12 Source Type: research
Conclusions The COVID-19 pandemic acutely affected patient care and overall institutional operations. The research consortium of New York and New Jersey rehabilitation institutions responded dynamically to bed expansions/contractions, staff deployment, and innovations that facilitated safe and effective patient care.
Source: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: SPECIAL SECTION on COVID-19 and PM&R Source Type: research
Objectives The aims of the study were to describe an interdisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation program for patients recovering from COVID-19 and to evaluate functional outcomes. Design This is an analysis of retrospective data captured from the electronic health record of COVID-19 patients admitted to the rehabilitation unit (N = 106). Rehabilitation approaches are described narratively. Functional gain was evaluated using the Activity Measure for Postacute Care 6 Clicks, basic mobility and daily activities. Results Interdisciplinary approaches were implemented to address the medical, physical, communica...
Source: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: SPECIAL SECTION on COVID-19 and PM&R Source Type: research
We present five models of care in varying degrees of development and compare processes and adaptations to address the unique needs of each center and their unique patient populations. Forging a path to recovery will necessitate a multidisciplinary team with physiatry involvement to meet the distinctive needs of patients with postacute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, it is imperative that there be equitable access to this care and commitment from healthcare institutions to provide resources for these programs.
Source: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: SPECIAL SECTION on COVID-19 and PM&R Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global pandemic. The virus primarily affects the lungs where it induces respiratory distress syndrome ranging from mild to acute, however, there is a growing body of evidence supporting its negative effects on other system organs that also carry the ACE2 receptor, such as the placenta. The majority of newborns delivered from SARS-CoV-2 positive mothers test negative following delivery, suggesting that there are protective mechanisms within the placenta. There appears to be a higher incidence of pregna...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThere is an increased risk of abortion in mothers with a positive test result of SARS-CoV-2, which several case reports and case series have identified during the pandemic. Placental inflammation during the viral infection may result in fetal growth retardation and induce abortion. There has not been any consistent evidence of vertical transmission of the virus from mother to fetus, which requires further investigation.
Source: PLoS One - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractStudy questionUnder deadly pandemic conditions involving the novel SARS-CoV –2 corona virus, could biopsied blastocysts be safely cryopreserved, stored and utilized for subsequent warming cycles?Summary answerBlastocysts were securely stored, effectively warmed and safely transferred to yield normal pregnancy outcomes under uncertain laboratory conditions subject to unprecedented policy changes.What is known alreadyBy April 2020, every IVF lab worldwide was implementing deep cleaning/disinfecting procedures in their laboratory and patient-contact areas, thorough hand-washing policies and mandatory PPE to redu...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Rather a gap since the last one.  Apologies for that.First two things relating to COVID.  The Nuffield Trust have investigatedadverse outcomes for babies born during the pandemic.  And ascoping review about vertical transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2.And other research.  A systematic review of the maternal, fetal, and child outcomes of mental health treatments in women, from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in the USA.  ARCT of delivery mode after manual rotation of occiput posterior fetal positions. Two Cochrane reviews: ...
Source: Browsing - Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs
Abstract SARS-CoV-2 virus was first identified in the beginning of 2020 and has spread all over the world, causing the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The virus is a member of the Coronavirus family, which includes viruses that cause common cold, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). MERS and SARS are known by causing adverse events in pregnancy. Considering that SARS-CoV-2 is a new infection agent, little is known about the risk of its infection to human embryo/fetal development. However, SARS and MERS were associated with negative outcomes, such as miscarriage...
Source: Genetics and Molecular Biology - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
More than 130 million women give birth around the world each year. During pregnancy, changes in the immune system make women generally more susceptible to respiratory infections. And this year, pregnant women also have to worry about COVID-19, a virus that can affect a person’s lungs and airways. The U.K. government announced on Monday that pregnant women were at an increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19). Speaking at a press conference, Public Health England chief medical officer Chris Whitty said people in the “high risk” category should stay at home for 12 weeks. (That includes pe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Londontime Source Type: news
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