Featured review: Colchicine for Covid

Is colchicine an effective treatment for people with COVID-19?Colchicine was debated to be a potential treatment option for COVID-19, hoping that the medication ’s anti-inflammatory properties could prevent or reduce a dysregulated immune response.Although there are completed studies without publication and diverse ongoing studies that could change our findings, the current evidence taken from 3 studies is moderate that colchicine makes no difference for people with moderate to severe disease. The safety of the medication remained unclear- given the restricted dosage range and the inconsistent reporting of (serious) adverse events.For outpatients, we found data from one study retrieving that colchicine probably results in a slight reduction of combined risk of admission to hospital or death within 28 days and serious adverse events, but we are uncertain about the isolated risk of death at up to day 28.If further studies are planned, especially for the outpatients, the measurement of the quality of life and more detailed reporting of adverse events would be essential.Key messagesIn hospitalised people with moderate to severe COVID-19, colchicine probably has little to no benefit; we are uncertain about its side effects.In non-hospitalised people with no symptoms or mild COVID-19, we are uncertain whether colchicine prevents deaths or side effects, however it probably reduces the need for hospitalisation or death and serious side effects slightly.Future studies should ass...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news

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This article summarizes the top 20 research studies of 2020 identified as POEMs (patient-oriented evidence that matters), including the two most highly rated guidelines of the year on gout and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Regarding COVID-19, handwashing and social distancing through stay-at-home orders or quarantine measures are effective at slowing the spread of illness. Use of proper face masks (not gaiters or bandanas) is also effective at preventing trans- mission. This is important because the virus can infect others during the presymptomatic phase. Aspirin can no longer be recommended for the primary...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The data collected does not support the concern for an increased risk of developing adverse reactions following soft tissue filler injections associated with the COVID-19 vaccines compared to that risk associated with other previously described triggers or the default risk following soft tissue filler injections. J Drugs Dermatol. 20(4):374-378. doi:10.36849/JDD.2021.6041.PMID:33852237 | DOI:10.36849/JDD.2021.6041
Source: Journal of Drugs in Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
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