Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS)

Title: Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS)Category: Procedures and TestsCreated: 2/3/2005 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/4/2021 12:00:00 AM
Source: MedicineNet Chronic Pain General - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: news

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Conditions:   Knee Pain Chronic;   Knee Osteoarthritis Interventions:   Device: Active TENS;   Device: Sham TENS Sponsors:   Omron Healthcare Co., Ltd.;   Western Michigan University Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionTENS can be predictive for patient selection in PNFS, as TENS positive patients showed significant correlation with a positive PNFS trial period. Therefore, TENS positive patients might be justifiable to be directly implanted with leads and IPG. TENS positive patients further tend to show a better improvement in the follow-up.
Source: Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research Source Type: research
AbstractObjectivesTranscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and interferential currents (IFC) are pain electrotherapies with questioned efficacy. Studies of their effects on tactile acuity of individuals with nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) are limited, hence, this study.Materials and MethodsThirty-three individuals with NSCLBP randomly allocated into three groups completed this study. Data collected from participants included age, gender, and anthropometric characteristics of height, weight, body mass index, and percentage body fat measured with standard instruments. Also, participants' tactile acuity,...
Source: Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research Source Type: research
The objective was to investigate the effects of dry needling (DN) on pain, disability, kinesiophobia, pain catastrophizing and psychological distress in patients with chronic neck pain.METHODS: A double blind randomized controlled pilot trial was designed. Twenty-one patients with chronic neck pain were randomly allocated to the DN group (n= 7), Sham-DN group (n= 7) or Control group (n= 7). All groups received a Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Therapeutic Ultrasound (TENS/US) protocol with patient education. The DN and Sham-DN groups received two sessions of DN and sham DN, respectively. The primary outcome...
Source: Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
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