"Big Three" Infectious Diseases: Tuberculosis, Malaria and HIV/AIDS

Curr Top Med Chem. 2021 Sep 16. doi: 10.2174/1568026621666210916170417. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTInfectious diseases have been evolving and re-evolving over the ages and causing immense misery to humans. Among them, some have been prevented and eradicated, but few are still threatening the modern era since their origin. The majority of these infectious diseases are poverty-driven, hence highly prevalent in the lower-income and mid-income countries of Africa and Asia. The world's deadliest infections, including Tuberculosis, Malaria and HIV/AIDS, have been considered as the "Big Three" infectious diseases (BTIDs). With leading infections and deaths every year, the BTIDs have been recognized as the world's greatest pandemics. In light of these alarming situations, this review has been aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the current status of chemotherapeutics, associated challenges and future perspectives of BTIDs.PMID:34530712 | DOI:10.2174/1568026621666210916170417
Source: Topics in HIV Medicine - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research

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Curr Top Med Chem. 2021 Sep 16. doi: 10.2174/1568026621666210916170417. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTInfectious diseases have been evolving and re-evolving over the ages and causing immense misery to humans. Among them, some have been prevented and eradicated, but few are still threatening the modern era since their origin. The majority of these infectious diseases are poverty-driven, hence highly prevalent in the lower-income and mid-income countries of Africa and Asia. The world's deadliest infections, including Tuberculosis, Malaria and HIV/AIDS, have been considered as the "Big Three" infectious diseases (BT...
Source: Topics in HIV Medicine - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
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This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.
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