A clinical description of chronic pain in a general population using ICD-10 and ICD-11 (The HUNT pain examination study)

The majority of our knowledge of chronic pain in the general population comes from self-report studies. During the last three decades most of these population-based surveys have found that 20% to 35% of the general population suffer from chronic pain [4,6,10,22,23,25,27]. Globally, it is estimated that low back pain, migraine, neck pain, other musculoskeletal disorders, osteoarthritis, and tension type headache are rank numbered 1, 2, 6, 7, 12, and 28 with respect to causes of years lived with disability and that respectively 650, 850, 350, 250, 240, and 1560 million people worldwide suffer from these pain-related disorders [28].
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research

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ConclusionsWe established the feasibility of initiating and managing patients in a monthly text-based symptom-monitoring program. The provision of smartphones and patient navigation were unique and vital components of this program.
Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
ConclusionsInformatics solutions can generate timely, tailored office reports including PROs and predictive analytics. Patients successfully complete the pre-visit PRO assessments and clinicians and patients value the report to support shared surgical decisions.
Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
Authors: Borisovskaya A, Chmelik E, Karnik A Abstract In this chapter, we describe the impact and etiology of chronic pain, the associated changes in the nervous system, and the mechanisms by which exercise may be able to affect and reverse these changes. Evidence for efficacy of exercise in different conditions associated with chronic pain is presented, with focus on chronic low back pain, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and migraines. While the efficacy of exercise and level of evidence supporting it vary in different diseases, exercise has direct and indirect benefits for most patients suffer...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Over the past few years I’ve been pondering the presumed gap between people living with pain and the people who “treat” or work with them.  Most of my readers will know that I live with widespread pain (aka fibromyalgia) or pain that is present in many parts of my body, and the associated other symptoms like DOMS that last for weeks not a day or two, and increased sensitivity to heat, cold, pressure, chilli, sound and so on. I first “came out” with my pain about 15 years ago: that is, I first disclosed to people I worked with that I had this weird ongoing pain – and finally joined...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Professional topics Research Therapeutic approaches inclusion inequality Source Type: blogs
For over 20 years, Linda Buonanno lived in fear that her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) would suddenly interrupt her daily routine with frequent trips to the bathroom and unbearable cramping. Buonanno, now a 71-year-old medical assistant and hairdresser from Methuen, Mass., tried everything from drugs to dairy-free diets. Nothing worked. She remembers a particularly tough period over 10 years ago, when she was working on the factory floor of a medical-device company for up to 10 hours a day, six days a week. When an IBS episode would strike, her co-workers would cover for her as she huddled in a corner, keeled over in pain...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine Research Source Type: news
As I read blogs and tweets and posts on social media, and even peer reviewed papers in journals, I often read that what we’re trying to do in sub-acute pain management is to prevent chronic pain from developing (note, when I talk about pain that goes on beyond healing, more than three months, or has no useful function, I may use the term “chronic” or I may use the more recent term “persistent” – they mean the same thing, except persistent has perhaps less baggage…). I want to take aim at that focus – to prevent pain from persisting – and think carefully about it. Let&r...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Pain conditions Professional topics acceptance biopsychosocial disability healthcare pain management rehabilitation science treatment Source Type: blogs
In my last post I discussed some of the mechanisms thought to be involved in central sensitisation, and while many of the details remain pretty unknown, I think the general conclusion is that yes, it really is a thing. What do I mean by central sensitisation? Well, it’s curious, it can refer to the processes at spinal and brain levels that seem to reduce the usual descending inhibitory mechanisms, expand the areas in which neural activity takes place, and allows increased information flow to eventually reach conscious awareness. At the same time it can refer to the experience in which a person feels greater pain than...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice biopsychosocial disability pain management Source Type: blogs
Abstract PURPOSE: Fulranumab is an investigational, fully human recombinant monoclonal antibody (IgG2) that neutralizes the biological actions of human nerve growth factor. Low back pain is a common cause of noncancer chronic pain and represents one of the most significant socioeconomic health-related problems in developed countries. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the analgesic effect of fulranumab in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain. METHODS: Patients (aged 18-80 years) were randomized to receive subcutaneous injections every 4 weeks in...
Source: Clinical Therapeutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Clin Ther Source Type: research
This study aimed to assess the tolerability of the extended use (≤35 days) of MNK-155, a biphasic (immediate-release/extended-release) hydrocodone bitartrate/N-acetyl-p-aminophenol (acetaminophen) (IR/ER HB/APAP) 7.5/325-mg fixed-dose combination analgesic agent, in patients with chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) caused by osteoarthritis or chronic low back pain. IR/ER HB/APAP tablets deliver 25% of the HB dose and 50% of the APAP dose by IR and the remainder by ER over a 12-hour dosing interval. Although IR/ER HB/APAP is being developed for the management of moderate to severe acute pain, this model of CNCP was used for as...
Source: Clinical Therapeutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Clin Ther Source Type: research
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