How 3D Printing Could End The Deadly Shortage Of Donor Organs

Three-dimensional printing has been used to make everything from pizza to prostheses, and now researchers are working on using the emerging technology to fabricate hearts, kidneys, and other vital human organs. That would be very big news, as the number of people who desperately need an organ transplant far outstrips the number of donor organs available. On average, about 21 Americans die every day because a needed organ was unavailable. What exactly is the promise of 3D printing organs and tissues, or "bioprinting?" How does the technology work, and when might it start saving lives? For answers to these and other questions, HuffPost Science reached out to Dr. Anthony Atala (right), director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and a world-renowned expert in the field, to find out. See below for a lightly edited version of the Q &A. Can 3D printing end the shortage of organs? 3D printing is not magic. It is simply a way to scale up the current processes we use to engineer organs in the laboratory. Our team has successfully engineered bladders, cartilage, skin, urine tubes and vaginas that have been implanted in patients. Our goal is produce organ structures such as these with 3D printing to make the engineering process more precise and reproducible. The ultimate goal of regenerative medicine -– regardless of the way the organs are engineered -- is to help solve the shortage of donor organs. How might 3D-printed organs compare ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

Related Links:

Authors: Hu X, Su M, Lin J, Zhang L, Sun W, Zhang J, Tian Y, Qiu W Abstract Renal ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury is one of the most important risk factors for the occurrence of delayed graft function (DGF) after kidney transplantation; however, its mechanism remains not fully understood. In the present study, we screened differentially expressed genes in a murine model of renal IR injury by using high-throughput assays. We identified Corin as one of the most significantly downregulated genes among 2218 differentially expressed genes (≥2-fold, P
Source: Disease Markers - Category: Laboratory Medicine Tags: Dis Markers Source Type: research
This study showed that potential vicious cycles underlying ARDs are quite diverse and unique, triggered by diverse and unique factors that do not usually progress with age, thus casting doubts on the possibility of discovering the single molecular cause of aging and developing the single anti-aging pill. Rather, each disease appears to require an individual approach. However, it still cannot be excluded that some or all of these cycles are triggered by fundamental processes of aging, such as chronic inflammation or accumulation of senescent cells. Nevertheless, experimental data showing clear cause and effect relationships...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 16 February 2019Source: Social Science &MedicineAuthor(s): Athena EngmanAbstractThe concept of biographical disruption has now enjoyed nearly 40 years of use in medical sociology. This paper argues that taking an embodied approach to biographical disruption helps to explain the concept's enduring efficacy. Drawing on the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and contemporary theories of embodiment inspired by his phenomenology, this paper advances that biographical disruption involves, in the first instance, a disruption to the ability to enact an embodied orientation towards the world. Biogr...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: April 2019Source: Biomedicine &Pharmacotherapy, Volume 112Author(s): Negin Amini, Alireza Sarkaki, Mahin Dianat, Seyyed Ali Mard, Akram Ahangarpour, Mohammad BadaviAbstractRenal Ischemia-Reperfusion (IR) injury occurs due to circulatory shock and renal transplantation, leading to mortality and morbidity worldwide. The primary purpose of the current study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of the naringin (NAR) and trimetazidine (TMZ) on IR injury, renal hemodynamics, antioxidant capacity, microRNA-10a, and expression of apoptosis factors. Forty rats were divided into five groups randomly: Sham...
Source: Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 February 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Obstetrics &GynaecologyAuthor(s): Emily Haesler, Nabil Melhem, Manish D. SinhaAbstractRenal disease in women of childbearing age is estimated to be around 3%, consequently renal disease is not an uncommon co-morbidity in pregnancy. There has been considerable evidence published over the last 20 years to suggest that renal disease in pregnancy is associated with higher maternal, fetal and offspring morbidity. Studies published are largely heterogeneous, include unmatched cohort studies and focus on early neonatal outcomes suc...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Abstract The burden of chronic kidney disease is dramatically rising, making it a major public health concern worldwide. Kidney transplantation is now the best treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. Although kidney transplantation may improve survival and quality of life, its long-term results are hampered by immune- and/or non-immune-mediated complications. Thus, the identification of transplanted patients with a higher risk of posttransplant complications has become a big challenge for public health. However, current biomarkers of posttransplant complications have a poor predictive value, rising th...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Obesity is now common among children and adults who are kidney transplant candidates and recipients. It is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and kidney failure. This also pertains to potential living kidney donors with obesity. Obese patients with end-stage renal disease benefit from transplantation as do nonobese patients, but obesity is also associated with more risk. A complicating factor is that obesity is also associated with increased survival on maintenance dialysis in adults, but not in children. The assessment of obesity and body habitus should be individualized. Body mass index is a comm...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
Forty million people in Western Europe have chronic kidney disease (CKD).1 The number of patients receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) increased by 23% from 2006 to 2015.2,3 Males predominate on dialysis. The mean age of patients receiving dialysis is 61.3 years, and 19% are over 80 years.3 Hemodialysis and transplantation predominate, costing around €40,000 to €80,000 and €10,000 to €20,000 per patient per year, respectively.1 Overall, 2% of health expenditure is consumed by RRT for 0.1% of the population.
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Policy Forum Source Type: research
So-called conservative management can ease symptoms without dialysis in some people with kidney disease. But many of them are never given the option.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Kidneys Transplants Dialysis Organ Donation Death and Dying Elderly JAMA Internal Medicine (Journal) United States Renal Data System Veterans Affairs Department Source Type: news
Condition:   Kidney Transplant; Complications Interventions:   Drug: Extended Release Tacrolimus Tablets;   Drug: Immediate Release Tacrolimus Capsule Sponsors:   Roy D. Bloom, MD;   Veloxis Pharmaceuticals Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
More News: Cardiology | Computers | Environmental Health | Heart | Heart Transplant | Kidney Transplant | Kidney Transplantation | Laboratory Medicine | Learning | Liver | Liver Transplant | Lung Transplant | Nutrition | Pancreas | PET Scan | Science | Skin | Skin Biopsy | Transplant Surgery | Transplants | Universities & Medical Training | Urology & Nephrology