Effects of COVID-19 Pandemic on Reported Lyme Disease, United States, 2020

D. W. McCormick et al.
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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Emerg Infect Dis. 2021 Oct;27(10):2715-2717. doi: 10.3201/eid2710.210903.ABSTRACTSurveys indicate US residents spent more time outdoors in 2020 than in 2019, but fewer tick bite-related emergency department visits and Lyme disease laboratory tests were reported. Despite ongoing exposure, Lyme disease case reporting for 2020 might be artificially reduced due to coronavirus disease-associated changes in healthcare-seeking behavior.PMID:34545801 | DOI:10.3201/eid2710.210903
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
At my animal hospital in upstate New York, an epicenter of the U.S. tick epidemic, my dog Fawn lets out a whimper as the veterinarian injects her with her annual Lyme disease shot. I roll my eyes. She doesn’t know how good she has it. The injection means that if a tick bites her (and in rural New York, a tick always does), the creepy crawly will feast on dog blood that’s been supercharged with a Lyme bacteria-killing substance, and Lyme disease won’t be transmitted to Fawn. I wish I could be shot up with that superpower. Currently, there is no human vaccine for Lyme disease—even though more than two...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Disease feature Source Type: news
While the COVID-19 pandemic is not over by any means, more people are getting vaccinated, and restrictions are gradually lifting. After too much time spent inactive and indoors, what better way to move your body and enjoy nature than by taking a hike? In many ways, hiking is the ideal antidote to a global pandemic, as it can heal both body and soul. Enjoy the benefits of a hike Like power walking, hiking offers a moderate-intensity cardio workout, provided your route includes some hills or inclines. Trekking on uneven surfaces engages your core muscles and improves your balance. Hiking also is a mood booster. Research sho...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Aging Heart Health Mental Health Source Type: blogs
A common refrain during the COVID-19 pandemic is, “I’m so tired.” After months of adjusted living and anxiety, people are understandably weary. Parents who haven’t had a break from their kids are worn out. Those trying to juggle working from home with homeschooling are stretched thin. Between concerns about health, finances, and isolation, everyone is feeling some level of additional stress during this unusual time, and that’s tiring. We all could use a good, long nap — or better yet, a vacation. But while a break would be nice, most people — except those who are actually sick with...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Autoimmune diseases Fatigue Source Type: blogs
A few years ago, Jaime Seltzer was helping coordinate research projects, grant applications and funding for a Stanford research group studying a condition called myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Up to 2.5 million Americans, including Seltzer, have ME/CFS, and yet it felt like almost no one paid attention to her group’s research. “What is it going to take for researchers to take ME seriously?” she and her colleagues often wondered aloud. The morbid answer, they hypothesized, was a pandemic. Since ME/CFS often follows viral infections, they feared it would take something as destr...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Suppose you are suddenly are stricken with COVID-19. You become very ill for several weeks. On awakening every morning, you wonder if this day might be your last. And then you begin to turn the corner. Every day your worst symptoms — the fever, the terrible cough, the breathlessness — get a little better. You are winning, beating a life-threatening disease, and you no longer wonder if each day might be your last. In another week or two, you’ll be your old self. But weeks pass, and while the worst symptoms are gone, you’re not your old self — not even close. You can’t meet your responsibi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Brain and cognitive health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Fatigue Source Type: blogs
It ’s not just Covid-19. Pathogens once confined to nature are making their way into humans on a more regular basis. And it’s our fault.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Daszak, Peter China EcoHealth Alliance Nipah Virus Lyme Disease Congo, Democratic Republic of (Congo-Kinshasa) Quammen, David Wildlife Conservation Society SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Wildlife Trade Source Type: news
Credit: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR)By Lawrence SurendraBANGKOK, Thailand, Aug 24 2020 (IPS) The COVID 19 Pandemic continues relentlessly. Deaths approaching a million globally, 22 million infected and growing. Brazil, India, the US and Russia accounting for almost 50% of the total cases in the world. Medically the promise of a vaccine is given as signs of hope; what surprises awaits us when such a vaccine is available, would be another story. Economically, to address the uncertainty and the grim future ahead, the UN, some governments and even Joe Biden the US Presidential hopeful, are waving ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Insects can pass along serious illnesses, such as Lyme disease and West Nile virus. Because of covid-19, health agencies are focusing less on these problems.
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
(CNN) — After more than three months of shutdowns, mandatory quarantines, self-imposed exile from society and working from home, nature-lovers looking for a well-earned breath of fresh air could face a possible collision course between coronavirus and tick-borne illnesses this summer. A “perfect storm,” warns Eva Sapi, a University of New Haven biology professor and group director for the Lyme Disease Research Group. Noting the mild winter on the East Coast, Sapi says, “We do have a bad year for the ticks.” Hikers, campers and anyone else eager for an escape could “just explode into...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN LYME DISEASE tick season ticks Source Type: news
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