Fecal Microbiota Transplant from Young Mice Improves Cognitive Function in Old Mice

The gut microbiome shifts with age, reducing beneficial populations and increasing harmful populations that contribute to chronic inflammation. Today's research materials can be added to other examples in which an intervention to restore a more youthful gut microbiome in old animals results in improved function, both through a reduction in inflammation and increased production of beneficial metabolites such as butyrate, that promotes increased levels of BDNF and neurogenesis, among other effects. It is a challenge to pick apart which of the mechanisms are most influential, but restoring a more youthful gut microbiome is clearly beneficial. Fecal microbiota transplantation from young to old is an approach to the treatment of aspects of aging that could be comparatively rapidly rolled out in human medicine, in principle at least, given that such transplants are already used for cases in which the gut is overtaken by pathological bacteria. It isn't the only potential treatment with evidence to support its benefits. Innoculation with flagellin provokes the immune system into better gardening the gut microbiome, removing more of the pathological species, and also has some safety data in human patients already as a result of use as a vaccine adjuvant. More speculatively, it should be possible to achieve similar results via high dose probiotics, though here there is a lot more work to do with regard to establishing the right mix, dose, approach to delivery. It is entirely pla...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs