Current status of gastroesophageal reflux disease after sleeve gastrectomy: Still a long way to go

Biosci Trends. 2021 Aug 10. doi: 10.5582/bst.2021.01288. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTObesity is a public health concern that is becoming increasingly more serious around the world. Bariatric surgery has become more prevalent due to the obesity epidemic worldwide. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is one of the most popular procedures which is safe and efficient. Despite all its favorable features, however, there is an increasing evidence from the literature that the long-term incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is likely to represent the Achilles' heel of this procedure. Management of severe reflux after SG usually requires revisional surgery. The relationship between SG and GERD needs to be better ascertained in order to prevent related complications, such as esophageal adenocarcinoma. This review attempts to elucidate the effect of SG on GERD and the postoperative management of reflux disease according to recent literature in the hope of drawing the attention of clinicians to postoperative gastroesophageal reflux and guiding the optimal management strategy associated with this "troublesome complication".PMID:34373428 | DOI:10.5582/bst.2021.01288
Source: BioScience Trends - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research

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Biosci Trends. 2021 Aug 10. doi: 10.5582/bst.2021.01288. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTObesity is a public health concern that is becoming increasingly more serious around the world. Bariatric surgery has become more prevalent due to the obesity epidemic worldwide. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is one of the most popular procedures which is safe and efficient. Despite all its favorable features, however, there is an increasing evidence from the literature that the long-term incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is likely to represent the Achilles' heel of this procedure. Management of severe reflux after SG usually...
Source: BioScience Trends - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide and is associated with a higher mortality from several diseases, including adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and of the gastric cardia. Increased body mass index is associated with an increased incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett metaplasia, and adenocarcinoma of the cardia. Bariatric surgery remains the most effective therapy for morbid obesity and has the potential to improve weight-related GERD. A high index of suspicion is paramount for early detection of foregut neoplasia after bariatric surgery. PMID: 28325198 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Surgical Clinics of North America - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Surg Clin North Am Source Type: research
Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide and is associated with a higher mortality from several diseases, including adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and of the gastric cardia. Increased body mass index is associated with an increased incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett metaplasia, and adenocarcinoma of the cardia. Bariatric surgery remains the most effective therapy for morbid obesity and has the potential to improve weight-related GERD. A high index of suspicion is paramount for early detection of foregut neoplasia after bariatric surgery.
Source: Surgical Clinics of North America - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: April 2016 Source:Cancer Epidemiology, Volume 41 Author(s): Aaron P. Thrift Since the early 1970s, the incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has increased dramatically in most Western populations. In contrast, the incidence of oesophageal squamous-cell carcinoma has decreased in these same populations. Epidemiological studies conducted over the past decade have provided great insights into the etiology of oesophageal cancer. These studies have identified gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, obesity and cigarette smoking as risk factors for oesophageal adenocarcinoma, while use of nonsteroidal anti-infl...
Source: Cancer Epidemiology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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