O-210 Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) is not associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in IVF-ICSI cycles with autologous oocytes

AbstractStudy questionDoes an elevated SDF (>15%) increase the odds of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in autologous oocyte IVF-ICSI cycles from unselected couples?Summary answerNo adverse effects of high SDF on obstetric and neonatal outcomes have been found in couples with sperm fragmentation undergoing IVF-ICSI cycles with own eggs.What is known alreadySperm chromatin integrity assessment has been implemented as an additional tool in the clinical evaluation of sperm quality in infertile patients undergoing an assisted reproduction treatment. All of the published reports to date appraise its effect on clinical outcomes, and how it impacts embryo quality and the pregnancy chances after IVF and ICSI cycles. Sperm DNA integrity has also been hypothesized to affect offspring health but not many studies have reported in humans if an elevated SDF raises the risks of obstetric, delivery and neonatal outcomes.Study design, size, durationMulticentric retrospective cohort study of all IVF-ICSI cycles using autologous oocytes between January 2000-March 2019 at Spain IVIRMA clinics of couples with a SDF test on their ejaculated semen. The sperm fragmentation index was measured in all men with TUNEL assay. The database included 228 couples which had a delivery with at least a newborn. Subjects were divided into two study groups according to their level of SDF: ≤15% (low SDF) or >  15% (high SDF).Participants/materials, setting, methodsPatients with missed information ...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research