Gut Microbiota Diversity in HIV-Infected Patients on Successful Antiretroviral Treatment is Linked to Sexual Preferences but not CD4 Nadir

AbstractThe effects of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the gut microbiome are poorly understood and the literature data are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess the alpha and beta diversity of the fecal microbiota in HIV-infected patients on successful antiretroviral therapy with regard to sexual preferences and CD4 nadir. Thirty-six HIV-infected ART-treated patients with HIV viremia below 20 copies/ml and CD4  >  500 cells/μl were divided into two subgroups based on CD4 nadir. The composition of the intestinal microbiota was assessed by 16SrRNA sequencing (MiSeq Illumina). The alpha and beta diversity were analyzed according to CD4 nadir count and sexual preference. Several alpha diversity indexes were s ignificantly higher in the MSM group than in heterosexual patients. The alpha diversity did not differ significantly between patients with CD4 nadir>  500 cells/μl and CD4 nadir
Source: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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