Risk of transfusion-transmitted Babesia microti in Canada

DISCUSSION: The likelihood of clinically relevant TTB is low. Testing would have very little utility in Canada at this time. Ongoing pathogen surveillance in tick vectors is important as B. microti prevalence appears to be slowly increasing in Canada.PMID:34272882 | DOI:10.1111/trf.16595
Source: Transfusion - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research

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DISCUSSION: The likelihood of clinically relevant TTB is low. Testing would have very little utility in Canada at this time. Ongoing pathogen surveillance in tick vectors is important as B. microti prevalence appears to be slowly increasing in Canada.PMID:34272882 | DOI:10.1111/trf.16595
Source: Transfusion - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
The disease is most often caused by the tiny parasites and transmitted to humans in warmer months by deer ticks — the same ones that spread Lyme disease.
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
(TellMed Strategies) Bay Area Lyme Foundation, a leading sponsor of Lyme disease research in the U.S., today announced the publication of new data finding that five herbal medicines had potent activity compared to commonly-used antibiotics in test tubes against Babesia duncani, a malaria-like parasite found on the West Coast of the U.S. that causes the disease babesiosis.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Dermacentor reticulatus from north-eastern Poland were found to carry three of the most common tick-borne pathogens (B. burgdorferi s.l., Babesia canis, A. phagocytophilum) which lead to single and mixed infections. Babesia canis was the most prevalent pathogen identified in D. reticulatus. PMID: 33461099 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Advances in Medical Sciences - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Adv Med Sci Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: CaLSeN provides the first coordinated national active surveillance initiative for tick-borne disease in Canada. Through multidisciplinary collaborations between experts in each province, the pilot year was successful in establishing a baseline for Lyme disease risk across the country, allowing future trends to be detected and studied.PMID:33315999 | PMC:PMC7723316 | DOI:10.14745/ccdr.v46i10a08
Source: Can Commun Dis Rep - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
A common refrain during the COVID-19 pandemic is, “I’m so tired.” After months of adjusted living and anxiety, people are understandably weary. Parents who haven’t had a break from their kids are worn out. Those trying to juggle working from home with homeschooling are stretched thin. Between concerns about health, finances, and isolation, everyone is feeling some level of additional stress during this unusual time, and that’s tiring. We all could use a good, long nap — or better yet, a vacation. But while a break would be nice, most people — except those who are actually sick with...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Autoimmune diseases Fatigue Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: CaLSeN provides the first coordinated national active surveillance initiative for tick-borne disease in Canada. Through multidisciplinary collaborations between experts in each province, the pilot year was successful in establishing a baseline for Lyme disease risk across the country, allowing future trends to be detected and studied. PMID: 33315999 [PubMed]
Source: Can Commun Dis Rep - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Can Commun Dis Rep Source Type: research
Ticks and mosquitoes don’t care about COVID-19 safety protocols. They don’t care that people are trying to squeeze out the last moments of this restrictive summer by getting outdoors, hiking, or just sitting on their decks at night and feeling something that’s close to normal. COVID-19 has commanded our attention and caused people to adapt their behaviors to prevent one major health concern, but it doesn’t mean others have been eliminated. “Masks and social distancing will do nothing to protect you from what ticks and mosquitoes potentially carry,” says Dr. Todd Ellerin, director of infe...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Autoimmune diseases Prevention Safety Source Type: blogs
IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 5105: Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Tick-Borne Diseases in North-Central Wisconsin from 2000–2016 International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph17145105 Authors: Austin Rau Claudia Munoz-Zanzi Anna M. Schotthoefer Jonathan D. Oliver Jesse D. Berman Lyme disease is a well-recognized public health problem in the USA, however, other tick-borne diseases also have major public health impacts. Yet, limited research has evaluated changes in the spatial and temporal patterns of non-Lyme tick-borne diseases within endemic regions. Using laboratory dat...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Abstract Ticks are the most important vectors of human pathogens, leading to increased public health burdens worldwide. Tick-borne pathogens include viruses (e.g. tick-borne encephalitis and Powassan); bacteria, such as the causative agents of Lyme disease, spotted fever rickettsiosis and human anaplasmosis; and malaria-like protozoan parasites causing babesiosis. Tick-borne diseases are emerging due to the geographical expansion of their tick vectors, especially in the northern hemisphere. Two examples of this phenomenon are Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum, which have expanded their ranges in the USA i...
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
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