How Climate Change Science Has Changed Due to COVID-19 Restrictions

In late 2019, expeditioners and guides Hilde Falun and Sunniva Sorby went to Norway’s remote Svalbard archipelago to complete a long-term goal of being the first female team to over winter in the Arctic. But the pair’s planned return home to mainland Norway coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and pretty quickly they found themselves stranded. There had been plans for a ship carrying friends and family to come and collect them as the ice began to melt in March, but travel restrictions got in the way, and they couldn’t come home until September. So instead, they spent the winter and much of spring up until May in an isolated, tiny wooden hut high up in the Arctic circle, surrounded by winter darkness. There was a definite upside, though, at least for the global scientific community: just as the two were stuck in Svalbard, fieldwork by climate scientists and researchers came to a standstill, as those who would normally travel to the Arctic to monitor the levels of melting ice as the region transitions from winter to summer were stuck at home. Faced with prolonged Arctic isolation as the rest of the world dealt with a growing pandemic, Falun and Sorby started collaborating with the scientists unable to travel, collecting data and samples to aid their research. Their work proved so useful that, after they finally did get to go home, they came back to their little hut for a second winter at the end of 2020. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Biomacromolecules. 2021 Sep 7. doi: 10.1021/acs.biomac.1c00799. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTAs the COVID-19 pandemic has continued to spread, studies have shown that hospitalized COVID-19 patients are at significant risk for developing acute kidney injury (AKI), which can cause increased morbidity, the need for dialysis treatment, chronic kidney diseases, and even death. In this paper, we present a proof-of-concept study for the utilization of combination therapeutic-loaded dual-targeted biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) to treat concurrent AKI and COVID-19 in patients by delivering the therapeutics across the gut epithe...
Source: Biomacromolecules - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Source Type: research
Well hello! I’m so glad you’re here. A version of this article also appeared in the It’s Not Just You newsletter. Sign up to get a new edition every Saturday. After another week of searing headlines about just about everything—global climate issues, the unfurling tragedies in Afghanistan, in Louisiana and parts south, the pandemic—all of it left me sleepless and sad and cynical. The latter is the most corrosive emotion I can think of right now, and when I’m not that ditch, it’s getting harder to imagine what our future looks like as the sands continue to sink and shift beneath our ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized It's Not Just You Source Type: news
Dominican Farmer and Vendor Ayma Louis has COVID restrictions and the hurrricane season to contend with. Credit: Alison Kentish (IPS)By Alison KentishDOMINICA, Aug 31 2021 (IPS) Around 2:00 pm on August 18, 89-year-old farmer Whitnel Louis and his wife Ayma began packing up their unsold produce, hoping to leave the capital of Roseau and get home way ahead of the 6 pm curfew recently put in place to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Their pickup was among dozens that lined the Dame Mary Eugenia Charles Boulevard, known by locals simply as ‘the Bayfront,’ a wide street near the ocean with a cruise ship bert...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Climate Change COVID-19 Development & Aid Environment Featured Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations COVID-19 vaccines Source Type: news
By External SourceAug 6 2021 (IPS-Partners) Awut Deng Acuil is the first female Minister of Education for South Sudan, and only the second person to serve as Minister of Education for her country – which became independent country in 2011. Prior to this role, Minister Acuil was the first woman to serve as the country’s Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation. Recently, Minister Acuil made history as the first women to lead a South Sudan university when she was appointed head of council at the University of Bahr El-Ghazal. Since 2005, Minister Acuil has served as Presidential Advisor on Gender...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Education Education Cannot Wait. Future of Education is here Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Education Cannot Wait (ECW) Source Type: news
When music fan Noah Zelinsky bought tickets to the Chicago music festival Lollapalooza in May, he thought it might signal something of a return to normalcy after more than a year of isolation. “There’s so much pent up excitement, being the first major thing back,” he says. But a lot can change in two months. “Now, there’s a lot of fear countering that.” This weekend, thousands of Lollapalooza attendees swept into Grant Park in the midst of a spike in the highly contagious Delta variant of the coronavirus. Leading up to the festival, Chicago’s COVID-19 daily case rate was quintuple ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized culturepod feature Music Source Type: news
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, Jul 20 2021 (IPS) Despite facing the world’s worst pandemic of the last century, rich countries in the World Trade Organization (WTO) have blocked efforts to enable more affordable access to the means to fight the pandemic. Everyone knows access for all to the means for testing, treatment and prevention – including diagnostic tests, therapeutic medicines, personal protective equipment and vaccines – is crucial. Anis ChowdhuryEuropean deceit In October 2020, South Africa and India requested the WTO to temporarily suspend relevant provisions...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Aid Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news
Inu Manak andScott LincicomeDo you drive an imported car or one made here by a  foreign‐​owned company? If so, you may be a serious threat to national security –if a  long‐​awaited report from the Trump administration is to be believed.No, really.Last week, the Department of Commerce finally released itsreport on U.S. imports of automobiles and certain automotive parts, as part of the Trump administration ’s 2018investigation pursuant to Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. While the report was submitted to the president on February 17, 2019, it was not published in the Federal...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
On Friday, March 19, my wife and I got in our cars to drive an hour south of our home in Franklin, Tennessee, a prosperous suburb of Nashville. The purpose of our trip was simple—to drive where it was easier and faster to schedule a COVID-19 vaccination. In Franklin it was hard. Demand was outstripping supply. Drive an hour south—to more rural Tennessee—and it was easy. Supply outstripped demand. When we arrived we were pleasantly surprised to see that the site was at least a little bit busy. The room was social-distanced but reasonably full. The atmosphere was pleasant and maybe even a little festive. Th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
The threat COVID has posed ever since it first appeared influenced how healthcare operates on many levels. It triggered a rapid expansion in health technology – some obvious, like the rise of telemedicine or at-home lab tests, others filled a much-needed immediate void. The demand for safe solutions inclined the development of robotic support in hospitals – and drones. I must admit, I expected the rise of drone-based solutions years ago (and I wasn’t alone with my expectations). By now, we are just at the very beginning of using drones in healthcare. And still, even now, when COVID-19 clearly showed th...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Covid-19 Forecast Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Portable Medical Diagnostics Robotics Security & Privacy Telemedicine & Smartphones drones telehealth medical drones mon Source Type: blogs
Well hello! I’m so glad you’re here. A version of this article also appeared in theIt’s Not Just You newsletter.Sign up here to receive a new edition every Sunday. As always, you can send comments to me at: Susanna@Time.com. A slew of beloved friends have been having babies lately. I’m embarrassingly emotional about their arrival, or even just the news that they’re on their way. Knowing that this new crop of young ones will uncover delight in this bruised world is one of those ancient wonders. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] It’s been a fractious and scary year, but these p...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized It's Not Just You Source Type: news
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