Neonatal meningitis: the immaturity of microbiota and epithelial barriers implicated

(Institut Pasteur) In a mouse model, scientists from the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with Inserm, Universit é de Paris and Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital (AP-HP) demonstrated that the immaturity of both the gut microbiota and epithelial barriers such as the gut and choroid plexus play a role in the susceptibility of newborn infants to bacterial meningitis caused by group B streptococcus (GBS). The findings were published in the journal Cell Reports on June 29, 2021
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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We describes a case of a 39-year-old Portuguese woman was seen for her second pregnancy. She had a previous normal delivery and her antenatal course was uncomplicated. She underwent a collection of vaginal and rectal exudates at 34  + 5weeks of gestation, to search for group B Streptococcus (GBS), without isolation.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Despite a relatively low incidence of invasive GBS infection in Norway, the risk of death and CP remains high. Improvements in prevention strategies are needed. IMPACT: During the first decade of the twenty-first century, invasive GBS disease in infancy is still associated with high mortality.Despite the overall low incidence of invasive GBS disease, the incidence of LOD increased during the study period.The finding that invasive GBS infection in the neonatal period or during infancy is associated with an excess risk of CP, comparable to the risk following moderate preterm birth and moderate low Apgar scor...
Source: Pediatric Research - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Pediatr Res Source Type: research
Source: Infection and Drug Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infection and Drug Resistance Source Type: research
Authors: Chuah CH, Ong YC, Kong BH, Woo YY, Wong PS, Leong KN, Chow TS Abstract Talaromycosis typically occurs as an opportunistic infection among immunocompromised individuals. Infection caused by species other than T. marneffei is uncommon. While most reported cases describe infection in the lungs, we report an extremely rare intracranial Talaromyces species infection. This 61-year-old with end-stage renal disease who was unwell for the previous two months, presented with fever and worsening confusion lasting for three days. Lumbar puncture was suggestive of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture was later...
Source: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh - Category: General Medicine Tags: J R Coll Physicians Edinb Source Type: research
Abstract Streptococcus agalactiae or group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a Gram-positive bacterium divided into ten distinct serotypes that colonizes the vaginal and rectal tracts of approximately 30% of women worldwide. GBS is the leading cause of invasive infection in newborns, causing sepsis, pneumoniae and meningitis. The main strategy to prevent GSB infection in newborns includes the use of intrapartum antibiotic therapy, which does not prevent late-onset diseases and may select resistant bacterial strains. We still do not have a vaccine formulation specific for this pathogen approved for human use. Conserved surf...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
We cared for an infant with respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV) and group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteremia and meningitis. Concurrent GBS meningitis and RSV is rare but highlights the importance of correlating clinical symptoms with viral diagnostic testing during the evaluation of infants at risk for serious bacterial infection.
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Brief Reports Source Type: research
We report our experience caring for an infant with respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV) and group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteremia and meningitis. Concurrent GBS meningitis and RSV is rare but highlights the importance of correlating clinical symptoms with viral diagnostic testing during the evaluation of infants at risk for serious bacterial infection.
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Brief Reports Source Type: research
Conclusions: The molecular epidemiology of a large collection of invasive neonatal infections showed similar distributions, as shown in smaller cohorts before. The microarray used proved to be a fast and reliable technique. Using this new tool, we were able to cluster the isolates according to their virulence factors. The clusters showed a better association with clinical data than single virulence factors.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Translational Medicine Reports Source Type: research
Group B Streptococcal (GBS) infections in the United States are a leading cause of meningitis and sepsis in newborns. The CDC therefore recommends GBS screening for all pregnant women at 35 –37 weeks of gestati...
Source: BMC Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
This study provides the first Italian data regarding late-onset sepsis (LOS) in all gestational age groups. Compared to full-term neonates, very high rates of LOS and mortality occurred in neonates with a lower birth weight and gestational age. Group B streptococcus was the leading cause of meningitis. Excluding CoNS, the predominant pathogens were Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Neonates with hospital-acquired LOS had a worse outcome. Antibiotic associations, recommended for empirical treatment of hospital- or community-acquired LOS, were adequate.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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