For transplant patients, COVID-19 vaccination presents a different uncertainty

(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at UC San Diego Health have launched a pair of clinical trials to study the immune response of COVID-19 vaccinated transplant recipients of bone marrow and solid organs, such as the heart, lung, liver and kidney.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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To date there is limited data on the immune profile and outcomes of solid organ transplant recipients who encounter COVID-19 infection early post-transplant. Here we present a unique case where the kidney recipient’s transplant surgery coincided with a positive SARS-CoV-2 test and the patient subsequently developed symptomatic COVID-19 perioperatively. We performed comprehensive immunological monitoring of cellular, proteomic, and serological changes during the first 4 critical months post-infection. We showed that continuation of basiliximab induction and maintenance of triple immunosuppression did not significantly...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Exp Clin Transplant. 2021 Sep;19(9):977-980. doi: 10.6002/ect.2021.0232.ABSTRACTOne year after COVID-19 was declared a pandemic, the management of the disease in kidney transplant patients remains uncertain. The interruption of immunosuppressive therapy is frequently suggested in kidney transplant recipients with COVID-19; however, such an interruption potentially increases the risk of allograft rejection and hyperimmune response. We here report the successful treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia in a kidney transplant recipient who received a sirolimus-based regimen. The course of COVID-19 management was favorable for maintain...
Source: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Exp Clin Transplant. 2021 Sep;19(9):899-909. doi: 10.6002/ect.2021.0188.ABSTRACTOBJECTIVES: Data are so far limited on outcomes of kidney transplant recipients with COVID-19 seen at public sector hospitals in developing countries with limited resources.MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively investigated a cohort of 157 kidney transplant recipients (75% living and 25% deceased donors) seen at a public sector transplant hospital in India from March to December 2020 who had reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction tests that confirmed COVID-19. Demographic data, immunosuppression regimens, clinical profiles, treatme...
Source: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
In this narrative medicine essay, a critical care physician tells how plans for her sister ’s kidney transplant halted last year when the COVID-19 pandemic caused the shutdown of most nonurgent medical care services and hopes the system can develop a better process for patients with chronic diseases.
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Nefrologia. 2021 May-Jun;41(3):349-352. doi: 10.1016/j.nefro.2020.07.003. Epub 2020 Sep 12.NO ABSTRACTPMID:34539004 | PMC:PMC7486811 | DOI:10.1016/j.nefro.2020.07.003
Source: Nefrologia : publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Transpl Immunol. 2021 Sep 15:101469. doi: 10.1016/j.trim.2021.101469. Online ahead of print.NO ABSTRACTPMID:34536553 | PMC:PMC8443310 | DOI:10.1016/j.trim.2021.101469
Source: Transplant Immunology - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) –vaccinated kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) display a lower-than-normal antibody (Ab) response toward severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), indicating a reduced humoral immune response against the virus.1 A remaining question is to which extent this translates to lower the ability of KTRs to combat SARS-CoV-2.2 This capacity can be estimated by surrogate or pseudovirus neutralization assays or, optimally, the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), in which live SARS-CoV-2 is challenged directly with patient blood plasma.
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
COVID-19 vaccinated kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) display a lower-than-normal antibody (Ab) response towards SARS-CoV-2, indicating a reduced humoral immune response against the virus [1]. A remaining question is to which extend this translates to lower ability of KTRs to combat SARS-COV-2 [2]. This capacity can be estimated by surrogate or pseudovirus neutralization assays or, optimally, the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) in which live SARS-COV-2 is challenged directly with patient blood plasma [3, 4].
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: letters to the editor Source Type: research
ConclusionOur results suggest vaccine response in adolescent KRT is lower than that of the general population, but similar to that previously described in adult SOT patients and slightly better than that seen in adult KTR. This data demonstrates vaccination is safe and supports immunizing KTR who remain hesitant. Future studies should focus on better understanding of the cellular immune response to vaccination and strategies to enhance vaccine immunogenicity in pediatric SOT patients.Graphical abstract
Source: Pediatric Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
In this study, mature DCs (mDCs), generated from the GM-CSF and IL-4 induced bone marrow cells, were intravenously injected into wild-type mice. Three days later, assays showed that the mDCs were indeed able to return to the thymus. Homing DCs have been mainly reported to deplete thymocytes and induce tolerance. However, medullary TECs (mTECs) play a crucial role in inducing immune tolerance. Thus, we evaluated whether the mDCs homing into the thymus led to TECs depletion. We cocultured mDCs with mTEC1 cells and found that the mDCs induced the apoptosis and inhibited the proliferation of mTEC1 cells. These effects were onl...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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